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ED80 differences

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#1 sportshoes

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 07:41 AM

Hi all.

 

Looking for a little help for a purchase of a refractor for basic astrophotgraphy.

Wondering about practical differences between Explore Scientific ED80 and ED80-FCD100 and perhaps other 80mm such as Meade 80mm Series 6000 ED Triplet APO. These are all around the same price range give or take a few hundred dollars, so just wondering if there are any serious pitfalls with any of these. Availability is also an issue and I want to be careful about just taking what I can get which at the moment seems to be the ED80-FCD100 or the Meade.

 

I've been successfully using a 200mm Newt and would like to get something more dedicated to astrophotography. 

 

Thanks


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#2 psychwolf

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 09:10 AM

If you're using for astrophotography, note the need for a strong mount first. If you've got that, then note Field Flattener/Reducer is probably going to be a major tool you'll want to include in your purchase, so may want to figure in the cost of one with the scope when you get it, vs finding one later in case the model changes and it's no longer offered, etc.

 

They both appear to be fine scopes though. 

 

Have you considered starting with a used scope first? Here's one of the scopes you're looking for, not at a huge discount but lower than new: https://www.cloudyni...et-6000-series/

 

That's what I did when I got into refractors - paid about 400 for my first Vixen ED81s Wt, and it was a gem with Japanese optics for a quality doublet that was out of the budget new. Instead of availability issues and buying high, you're able to take advantage of the swing of people selling new scopes they got during the lockdowns, etc. Seems to be a lot of used refractors here in the classifieds, haven't had a problem with any of the ones I've picked up there.


Edited by psychwolf, 06 April 2021 - 09:14 AM.

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#3 droe

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 09:18 AM

I would go for the ED80-FCD100. I have the 127mm version and it blows everything away. I do also have the ED80-nonFCD100 and I wish I had the FCD100 version. The ED80-nonFCD100 is still good and I use it but there is a little more processing involved. The ED80-FCD100 is definitely made for astrophotography. Also the ED102-FCD100 might also be a great choice.  

 

I use the Orion FF and Orion 0.8x reducer and they seem to work great.

 

Also the mount is more important then the scope for astrophotography. If you need to upgrade a piece of equipment do it on the mount. You can fix most scope issue in processing but you can't fix tracking and shaky mount issues.

 

Good luck and have fun.


Edited by droe, 06 April 2021 - 09:20 AM.


#4 teashea

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Posted 06 April 2021 - 11:13 AM

If you're using for astrophotography, note the need for a strong mount first. If you've got that, then note Field Flattener/Reducer is probably going to be a major tool you'll want to include in your purchase, so may want to figure in the cost of one with the scope when you get it, vs finding one later in case the model changes and it's no longer offered, etc.

 

They both appear to be fine scopes though. 

 

Have you considered starting with a used scope first? Here's one of the scopes you're looking for, not at a huge discount but lower than new: https://www.cloudyni...et-6000-series/

 

That's what I did when I got into refractors - paid about 400 for my first Vixen ED81s Wt, and it was a gem with Japanese optics for a quality doublet that was out of the budget new. Instead of availability issues and buying high, you're able to take advantage of the swing of people selling new scopes they got during the lockdowns, etc. Seems to be a lot of used refractors here in the classifieds, haven't had a problem with any of the ones I've picked up there.

I agree that the mount is the most important consideration.



#5 sportshoes

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Posted 07 April 2021 - 07:04 AM

Thanks. Much Appreciated




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