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What did you NOT observe with your classic telescope today?

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#76 rcwolpert

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Posted 13 April 2021 - 10:56 AM

"How is the viewing from your balcony Bob?"

 

I can't really view from the window in the above photo. Well, I suppose I could but I'd let every mosquito and no see um into the condo, and if they didn't kill me, my wife would!    chair.gif

 

I can view from the balcony/catwalk shown below, and it does have a nice southern view, but besides the overhead catwalk lights, the street lamps make it only useful for the sun, moon and brighter planets. Seems that old people really want their sidewalks lit up at night. mad.gif

 

med_gallery_211497_9431_246759.jpeg


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#77 rcwolpert

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Posted 13 April 2021 - 11:04 AM

" (is that  an ES 335  in blonde I saw in  post 41 lurking behind  the Q?)"

 

Ahh...good eye! Yes, it's the ES-335 Pro.  Then, going accoustic, I also have a really nice Martin, a Taylor, and an Ibanez 12-string I purchased in 1975 that has amazing sound.

 

I need to add guitar playing to my excuses for not observing with my classic scopes. Every once in a while I'll have my guitar playing and singing friend and his wife come over and we all get wasted while playing Beatles, Bon Jovi, Tom Petty, etc.   When my scopes hear the guitars, they know they're in for the night.


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#78 CHASLX200

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Posted 13 April 2021 - 06:11 PM

I have not looked at anything since last week. Waiting Jupiter out until it gets high enough before sunup. Saturn don't do much for me but may roll out the 18" for it soon one morning.


Edited by CHASLX200, 13 April 2021 - 06:12 PM.

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#79 Bonco2

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Posted 14 April 2021 - 03:52 PM

What's so fascinating about Saturn is of course the rings but in a large telescope like the 18 inch you can see so many moons. To me it's spectacular, almost nothing else viewable that is so stunning. 

Just sayin'

Bill


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#80 Terra Nova

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Posted 14 April 2021 - 05:47 PM

What's so fascinating about Saturn is of course the rings but in a large telescope like the 18 inch you can see so many moons. To me it's spectacular, almost nothing else viewable that is so stunning. 

Just sayin'

Bill

I remember one night observing the Encke Gap in the 16” Clark at the Cincinnati Observatory. It was really quite amazing. The viewing was kind of unsettled, image,coming and going in clarity, I just kept watching, and then all of a sudden.... It was just, right there, plain as day! It just popped! Really stunning!


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#81 CHASLX200

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Posted 14 April 2021 - 06:44 PM

What's so fascinating about Saturn is of course the rings but in a large telescope like the 18 inch you can see so many moons. To me it's spectacular, almost nothing else viewable that is so stunning. 

Just sayin'

Bill

Just not much action on the disk other than every 30 years or so you get them white spots like back around 1990 or around there i think.  I guess it has been so low for so long i kinda gave up on it. It is coming out of the murk but will be another 4 years before it gets better even for me in FL.  Only moons i ever care about are the 4 big 1's of Jupiter.  They make a great target for testing out a scopes optics at very high power.  I use them to judge a mirror or lens on how sharp the edges of the disk are.  Kinda be nice to see if i am shipping the 18" mirror off for a refigure or keeping it as is once i get some time on Jupiter. 2 more weeks and it will be time.


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#82 starman876

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Posted 14 April 2021 - 09:03 PM

I remember one night observing the Encke Gap in the 16” Clark at the Cincinnati Observatory. It was really quite amazing. The viewing was kind of unsettled, image,coming and going in clarity, I just kept watching, and then all of a sudden.... It was just, right there, plain as day! It just popped! Really stunning!

Sounds like a dream come true.   Never look through a large  refractor like that.


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#83 mpsteidle

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Posted 15 April 2021 - 12:59 PM

Sounds like a dream come true.   Never look through a large  refractor like that.

Our club has an 8" Clark which I use frequently.  There is certainly something special about large refractors, it blows away most reflectors I've used on planets in terms of sharpness.


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#84 Bonco2

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Posted 15 April 2021 - 03:36 PM

Best view I ever had or will ever have viewing Saturn with a classic Is one I had in 1962 at the McDonald Observatory with the 80 (+) inch telescope. The night was a steady as a rock and the image scale was amazing and sharp.

Bill


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#85 Terra Nova

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Posted 15 April 2021 - 03:48 PM

Our club has an 8" Clark which I use frequently.  There is certainly something special about large refractors, it blows away most reflectors I've used on planets in terms of sharpness.

I gave a talk at CAS on a chilly and very clear winter night about five years ago. I well remember walking out on a snowy path from your club house to the observatory after my presentation and looking through the club’s 8” Clark. A very nice view it was indeed!


Edited by Terra Nova, 15 April 2021 - 04:10 PM.

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#86 davidmcgo

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Posted 16 April 2021 - 07:52 AM

I like to think of the difference as the refractor just gently steers the photons a little bit on their way while the reflector waits until they have all gone past your eye and hits them back to you with an aluminum baseball bat.  The refractor photons get there with less trauma!

Dave

 

Our club has an 8" Clark which I use frequently.  There is certainly something special about large refractors, it blows away most reflectors I've used on planets in terms of sharpness.


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#87 rcwolpert

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Posted Yesterday, 10:32 AM

“The refractor photons get there with less trauma.”

 

And it is widely known that they greatly appreciate the consideration and in return give you a better view.


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#88 starman876

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Posted Yesterday, 09:42 PM

I love  it when the refractor guys get fired up and tell how superior the views through a refractor are compared to a reflector.  I have to agree.    A shame  a large refractor


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#89 Terra Nova

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Posted Today, 09:27 AM

I love refractors! The only thing that can even come close in my mind is a really good Mak Cass!

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Edited by Terra Nova, Today, 09:30 AM.

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