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What did you NOT observe with your classic telescope today?

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#76 rcwolpert

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Posted 13 April 2021 - 10:56 AM

"How is the viewing from your balcony Bob?"

 

I can't really view from the window in the above photo. Well, I suppose I could but I'd let every mosquito and no see um into the condo, and if they didn't kill me, my wife would!    chair.gif

 

I can view from the balcony/catwalk shown below, and it does have a nice southern view, but besides the overhead catwalk lights, the street lamps make it only useful for the sun, moon and brighter planets. Seems that old people really want their sidewalks lit up at night. mad.gif

 

med_gallery_211497_9431_246759.jpeg


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#77 rcwolpert

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Posted 13 April 2021 - 11:04 AM

" (is that  an ES 335  in blonde I saw in  post 41 lurking behind  the Q?)"

 

Ahh...good eye! Yes, it's the ES-335 Pro.  Then, going accoustic, I also have a really nice Martin, a Taylor, and an Ibanez 12-string I purchased in 1975 that has amazing sound.

 

I need to add guitar playing to my excuses for not observing with my classic scopes. Every once in a while I'll have my guitar playing and singing friend and his wife come over and we all get wasted while playing Beatles, Bon Jovi, Tom Petty, etc.   When my scopes hear the guitars, they know they're in for the night.


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#78 CHASLX200

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Posted 13 April 2021 - 06:11 PM

I have not looked at anything since last week. Waiting Jupiter out until it gets high enough before sunup. Saturn don't do much for me but may roll out the 18" for it soon one morning.


Edited by CHASLX200, 13 April 2021 - 06:12 PM.

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#79 Bonco2

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Posted 14 April 2021 - 03:52 PM

What's so fascinating about Saturn is of course the rings but in a large telescope like the 18 inch you can see so many moons. To me it's spectacular, almost nothing else viewable that is so stunning. 

Just sayin'

Bill


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#80 Terra Nova

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Posted 14 April 2021 - 05:47 PM

What's so fascinating about Saturn is of course the rings but in a large telescope like the 18 inch you can see so many moons. To me it's spectacular, almost nothing else viewable that is so stunning. 

Just sayin'

Bill

I remember one night observing the Encke Gap in the 16” Clark at the Cincinnati Observatory. It was really quite amazing. The viewing was kind of unsettled, image,coming and going in clarity, I just kept watching, and then all of a sudden.... It was just, right there, plain as day! It just popped! Really stunning!


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#81 CHASLX200

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Posted 14 April 2021 - 06:44 PM

What's so fascinating about Saturn is of course the rings but in a large telescope like the 18 inch you can see so many moons. To me it's spectacular, almost nothing else viewable that is so stunning. 

Just sayin'

Bill

Just not much action on the disk other than every 30 years or so you get them white spots like back around 1990 or around there i think.  I guess it has been so low for so long i kinda gave up on it. It is coming out of the murk but will be another 4 years before it gets better even for me in FL.  Only moons i ever care about are the 4 big 1's of Jupiter.  They make a great target for testing out a scopes optics at very high power.  I use them to judge a mirror or lens on how sharp the edges of the disk are.  Kinda be nice to see if i am shipping the 18" mirror off for a refigure or keeping it as is once i get some time on Jupiter. 2 more weeks and it will be time.


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#82 starman876

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Posted 14 April 2021 - 09:03 PM

I remember one night observing the Encke Gap in the 16” Clark at the Cincinnati Observatory. It was really quite amazing. The viewing was kind of unsettled, image,coming and going in clarity, I just kept watching, and then all of a sudden.... It was just, right there, plain as day! It just popped! Really stunning!

Sounds like a dream come true.   Never look through a large  refractor like that.


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#83 mpsteidle

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Posted 15 April 2021 - 12:59 PM

Sounds like a dream come true.   Never look through a large  refractor like that.

Our club has an 8" Clark which I use frequently.  There is certainly something special about large refractors, it blows away most reflectors I've used on planets in terms of sharpness.


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#84 Bonco2

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Posted 15 April 2021 - 03:36 PM

Best view I ever had or will ever have viewing Saturn with a classic Is one I had in 1962 at the McDonald Observatory with the 80 (+) inch telescope. The night was a steady as a rock and the image scale was amazing and sharp.

Bill


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#85 Terra Nova

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Posted 15 April 2021 - 03:48 PM

Our club has an 8" Clark which I use frequently.  There is certainly something special about large refractors, it blows away most reflectors I've used on planets in terms of sharpness.

I gave a talk at CAS on a chilly and very clear winter night about five years ago. I well remember walking out on a snowy path from your club house to the observatory after my presentation and looking through the club’s 8” Clark. A very nice view it was indeed!


Edited by Terra Nova, 15 April 2021 - 04:10 PM.

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#86 davidmcgo

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Posted 16 April 2021 - 07:52 AM

I like to think of the difference as the refractor just gently steers the photons a little bit on their way while the reflector waits until they have all gone past your eye and hits them back to you with an aluminum baseball bat.  The refractor photons get there with less trauma!

Dave

 

Our club has an 8" Clark which I use frequently.  There is certainly something special about large refractors, it blows away most reflectors I've used on planets in terms of sharpness.


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#87 rcwolpert

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Posted 17 April 2021 - 10:32 AM

“The refractor photons get there with less trauma.”

 

And it is widely known that they greatly appreciate the consideration and in return give you a better view.


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#88 starman876

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Posted 17 April 2021 - 09:42 PM

I love  it when the refractor guys get fired up and tell how superior the views through a refractor are compared to a reflector.  I have to agree.    A shame  a large refractor


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#89 Terra Nova

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Posted 18 April 2021 - 09:27 AM

I love refractors! The only thing that can even come close in my mind is a really good Mak Cass!

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Edited by Terra Nova, 18 April 2021 - 09:30 AM.

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#90 Stevencbradley

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Posted 24 April 2021 - 03:29 PM

I am lucky i guess because the place i have lived for the last 18+ years has the best dark skies of anywhere i have ever lived. I would maybe feel different if i had light polluted skies. I was devoted to the hobby as a kid but took a long break from it until my kids were in college. Our son played travel hockey and our daughter was a figure skater so Robin and i literally spent every weekend for years at ice rinks.
Since the early 90's i've been all in with the hobby. I have friends who were bigtime observers more than me and they got bored with the hobby but its never happend to me. I appreciate scopes but i love observing and outreach the most. 
Its already been suggested but dark skies really can rekindle the passion. Amateurs are a small group to begin with, as "Badger" Bob Johnson legendary hockey coach for the University of Wisconsin is famous for saying "It's a great day for hockey"  its always a "great night for astronomy" as long as its clear.


Wickenburg! I'm in Payson. Biggest problem here is my home location, top of a hill. Many have suggested I put my scope on a dolly, which, given the slant of our driveway, would make for an AFV classic. Also, it would be expensive. The good news is that the local dump is not far away. I would not have to worry about either of my larger scopes ever again. At the moment, I'm working on downsizing, trying to get out as often as I can. Haze is pretty bad right now (dust, fire)...but better later in the evening if dust settles. I find that I favor my smaller scopes and binos (too many binos!). What sidelined me(mid 2000's) was cataracts. They've been fixed for a while now, so I'm back. Glad to make your acquaintance. Lots of us "night people" in AZ...

Edited by Stevencbradley, 24 April 2021 - 03:31 PM.

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#91 rcwolpert

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Posted 25 April 2021 - 01:05 PM

First time I’ve heard of being at the top of a hill is the biggest problem for observing, but now I see how it could be.


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#92 Stevencbradley

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Posted 25 April 2021 - 01:23 PM

First time I’ve heard of being at the top of a hill is the biggest problem for observing, but now I see how it could be.


Probably would be better if the pad for our house hadn't had to be blasted out of the rock, severely limiting the free space. Also, the builders (we are 2nd owners) didn't bother to fully level the pad, so the driveway (best spot for observing) slants away from the house as well as being a steep 225 0r so feet from the bottom--and it's curved. I managed to get our little travel trailer up there (steep enough so I had to use 4wdLo range), and when we unhooked it, the trailer tongue slanted so I couldn't hook it up again. The re ally funny thing is how many places we rejected for purchase because driveways were steeper, curvier...
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#93 CHASLX200

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Posted 25 April 2021 - 02:47 PM

Not looked at a thing.  It is just about time to see if i am going to keep the Galaxy mirror in my 18" Obsession once Jupiter is high enough before sun up.  I figure in a week or two i can judge the mirror.  I may just sell the scope if the mirror is not close to Zambuto like or buy another mirror or deal with shipping the mirror for a refigure. Not sure i wanna deal with shipping a mirror and be scared to death of it being lost or broke.

 

Maybe sell the mirror and buy a new one with the same exact FL if that can be done. Blank would have to weight the same or it would cause all kinds of mounting problems and balance issues if it is not the same thickness.  Not sure what a good 18" mirror is worth these days if i do sell it.  If it lacks pop at 1000x i won't keep it.  To most it would be a great mirror but i want the best since i have the best seeing.


Edited by CHASLX200, 25 April 2021 - 02:48 PM.

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#94 Terra Nova

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 03:51 PM

Not looked at a thing.  It is just about time to see if i am going to keep the Galaxy mirror in my 18" Obsession once Jupiter is high enough before sun up.  I figure in a week or two i can judge the mirror.  I may just sell the scope if the mirror is not close to Zambuto like or buy another mirror or deal with shipping the mirror for a refigure. Not sure i wanna deal with shipping a mirror and be scared to death of it being lost or broke.

 

Maybe sell the mirror and buy a new one with the same exact FL if that can be done. Blank would have to weight the same or it would cause all kinds of mounting problems and balance issues if it is not the same thickness.  Not sure what a good 18" mirror is worth these days if i do sell it.  If it lacks pop at 1000x i won't keep it.  To most it would be a great mirror but i want the best since i have the best seeing.

Or if it’s not to your liking, drop down a notch in aperture and move up a notch in quality- ie. Sell it and get a 12” Portaball!



#95 CHASLX200

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 06:04 PM

Or if it’s not to your liking, drop down a notch in aperture and move up a notch in quality- ie. Sell it and get a 12” Portaball!

Never had one of them. Chances of one popping up local are not gonna happen. I would really much rather have a F/6 Dob and would be fine to go smaller and do away with coma and Paracorr. Like a 14.5" F/6 or a 16" F/5.6.


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#96 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 08:38 PM

Yes  for sure

 

Don't we love it when folks talk about going smaller to  16"s or 14"s

 

love to see a Portaball 12 inch     Have not seen one yet      but that would be splendid to get a chance to look through  I would bet


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#97 CHASLX200

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Posted 29 April 2021 - 05:45 AM

Yes  for sure

 

Don't we love it when folks talk about going smaller to  16"s or 14"s

 

love to see a Portaball 12 inch     Have not seen one yet      but that would be splendid to get a chance to look through  I would bet

Just can't beat Zambuto Optics in them Dobs.  I have a feeling my Galaxy is gonna come up short when i really give it a work out on Jupiter.  Sometime in May i will find out if i am keeping the mirror or buying another or doing a refigure.

 

Jupiter is still too low around 530am.  Once i slap up the power to 700x+ i will know very fast what i got using Jupiters moons for test subjects.  I find the moons at 700x and up the best way to test a bigger scopes optics and how clean and sharp the moons disk are.   The moon has looked good and Mars was ok but just way too small to really judge anything. Deep sky objects look fine.


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#98 rcwolpert

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Posted 29 April 2021 - 06:12 AM

This is making me wish I still had my 12.5” f/6.3 with its specially selected Coulter full-thickness mirror. I wonder where that mirror is now. If I had it, I bet I would have observed something last night. 


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#99 CHASLX200

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Posted 29 April 2021 - 06:18 AM

This is making me wish I still had my 12.5” f/6.3 with its specially selected Coulter full-thickness mirror. I wonder where that mirror is now. If I had it, I bet I would have observed something last night. 

F/6 + is so much better vs F/4.5 to my eyes.  I just hate having to deal with coma and a Paracorr,


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#100 starman876

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Posted 29 April 2021 - 06:50 AM

I wish my 12.5" portaball was easier  to move.  Since I put it in the lower level of the house it has been stuck there as it got buried further and further to the back.  Sure miss the views of looking like I was flying in orbit over jupiter.


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