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Recommendations for a first reflector

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#1 spiantino

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 09:03 AM

Hey all,

 

I've been having a lot of fun and success with my current setup - an ES 127 FD100 CF scope (952mm, flattened but not reduced), on a CEM70, with ASI6200MC and ZWO OAG, EFW, and EAF. After much tweaking everything seems to work well (well, guiding is always a struggle, but I can accept some lost subs here or there).

 

But it's galaxy season! So I'm interested in going down the path of a longer FL reflector, but am lost in the different types of telescopes, what I will need to learn in terms of collimation and coma correctors, etc.

 

Can anyone give some suggestions on a good, high quality reflecting scope that can reach some of the more interesting but small galaxies and will fit on my mount? I haven't weighed it, but the ff/filter wheel/oag/efw and camera are all pretty heavy as a package, so may have less wiggle room than it seems

 

Thank you, clear skies

-sp


Edited by spiantino, 08 April 2021 - 09:03 AM.


#2 Sandy Swede

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 09:16 AM

You may be able to 'back into' a good FL, and therefore, the scope for which you search.  Try Astronomy Tools to input your camera specs with various apertures and FL's.  That will help you define how small those 'small galaxies' for which you hunt should be.  Perhaps you will find and an f/12 or f/15 Maksutov is just the ticket.  Or, maybe the standard f/10 SCT will suffice.

 

https://astronomy.to.../field_of_view/

 

Caveat:  The longer your FL, the better the tracking accuracy your mount should have.


Edited by Sandy Swede, 08 April 2021 - 09:18 AM.

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#3 Gipht

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 09:52 AM

One good way of looking for equipment is to see what the better astro-photographers are using.  Astrobins image of the day (https://www.astrobin.com/iotd/archive/) displays some wonderful images.

 

One factor to consider is if automatic focus equipment  will be needed with the type of telescope.



#4 matt_astro_tx

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 10:15 AM

You may be able to 'back into' a good FL, and therefore, the scope for which you search.  Try Astronomy Tools to input your camera specs with various apertures and FL's.  That will help you define how small those 'small galaxies' for which you hunt should be.  Perhaps you will find and an f/12 or f/15 Maksutov is just the ticket.  Or, maybe the standard f/10 SCT will suffice.

 

https://astronomy.to.../field_of_view/

 

Caveat:  The longer your FL, the better the tracking accuracy your mount should have.

+1 on using astronomy.tools FOV calculator.  I spent a month on that site before purchasing a camera and scope.

 

Newtonians are relatively cheap and easy to use.  I have an 8" f/8 (1600mm)  Would recommend.  You may also consider an RC.  iOptron has several that are affordable.  For example their 8" RC has a FL of 1624mm.  GSO, TPO, etc. also offer 6" RCs that are a steal at <$500.

 

Let us know what you decide!



#5 bobzeq25

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 10:40 AM

A 6 inch SCT would be a good inexpensive companion to your refractor.  You already have the OAG.

 

I made the mistake of buying an "inexpensive" RC, a "$400" 6RC.  By the time I gave up on the scope I had $1200 in it.  "Inexpensive" and "RC" do not go together.  The scope is peculiarly sensitive to mechanical issues.

 

The 8 inch Edge would be a significantly better, significantly more expensive choice.  Less coma.

 

SCTs are among the easier scopes to collimate, the spherical primary helps a lot.




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