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new double star TYC 2392-01288-1

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#1 lakhdar

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 01:37 PM

hello my friends ,

my name is lakhdar ، i am from algeria ،

in 24/11/2020 ، we observe an occulation at srtar in auriga constellation : TYC 2392-01288-1
with asteroid : emma 283

this Observe has a positive in three places: czech ، italy and algeria ...
Then after the experts analyzed the resultats ، they discovered this star is double  ....

so we want to Confirm this discovery and take a photo for this star companion ، if any one can help us we grateful for you ..

 

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#2 c2m2t

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 02:58 PM

Hi Lakhdar!

I have attached three screen captures of information related to HD 282699 acquired from the University of Strasbourg's Aladin Sky Atlas. It is difficult to correlate your star field and Aladin. In any case, the first image confirms the star as HD 282699. The following images are zoomed in and show the survey data from the Nomad and UCAC4 catalogues as generated by the United States Naval Observatory, USNO, who are the keepers of the WDS or Washington Double Star Catalogue. The up close image looks very much like a single star, but...that is not to say that HD 282699 is not a spectroscopic binary. If that is indeed the case, most of us who frequent this forum would not be able to help because of the sophisticated imagery that is required to study such a tight pair. Hopefully, someone else who reads your post may be able to direct you to someone who can access the equipment and knowledge to investigate this further.

 

Cheers, Chris.

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  • HD 282699-Nomad.JPG
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#3 Astrojensen

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 04:47 PM

If it took an asteroid occultation to detect it as a double, then it is FAR too tight to be resolved by any amateur equipment. That it hasn't been detected by GAIA or wide-field spectroscopic surveys indicate that it's extremely tight indeed and that the companion might also be rather faint. A direct image might not be possible with ANY equipment available on Earth... 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark


Edited by Astrojensen, 08 April 2021 - 04:48 PM.

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#4 lakhdar

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Posted 09 April 2021 - 04:15 AM

Thank you very much my friends for the answer ...

Yes, my friends this is what I came up with during my research on the topic ..

But I want to know if possible what are the ways to study double stars ...

 

How much does an observatory dedicated to studying the spectra of stars cost and what are the characteristics of the required telescope?

 

And what if for example we photographed the star for days with a professional camera And a reflecting telescope 130 mm ??

 

thanks a gain ,

lakhdar 



#5 Astrojensen

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Posted 09 April 2021 - 06:26 AM

You'll really need to study basic astronomy and spectroscopy for a few years, if this is something you want to do. Basically, you will want to become an unpaid, professional astronomer, who is using his own equipment, he paid for himself (that's basically what "amateur" means, namely someone who does something unpaid). Some of my friends are like that. How expensive equipment they use vary wildly, but generally it's fairly advanced and sophisticated.  

 

It's not meant as a discouragement, but to give an idea of how to proceed. You're basically moving into the "science" part of amateur astronomy, instead of just the "astro-tourist" part, that most of us do, and if you want to do science, you'll have to study it. There's no way around that. 

 

https://www.shelyak....-setup/?lang=en

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark


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#6 lakhdar

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Posted 09 April 2021 - 10:33 AM

You'll really need to study basic astronomy and spectroscopy for a few years, if this is something you want to do. Basically, you will want to become an unpaid, professional astronomer, who is using his own equipment, he paid for himself (that's basically what "amateur" means, namely someone who does something unpaid). Some of my friends are like that. How expensive equipment they use vary wildly, but generally it's fairly advanced and sophisticated.  

 

It's not meant as a discouragement, but to give an idea of how to proceed. You're basically moving into the "science" part of amateur astronomy, instead of just the "astro-tourist" part, that most of us do, and if you want to do science, you'll have to study it. There's no way around that. 

 

https://www.shelyak....-setup/?lang=en

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark

Thank you for your reply
I did not mean to study the stars, we have universities in our country with specializations in astronomy and astrophysics
Unfortunately, we do not have observatories dedicated to studying astronomy, so we want to submit a request to establish an observatory that will be under the auspices of the university and researchers only. We are exploiting it in cases like these and we ask specialists to do research and study the star. I would like to know how much an observatory with a good telescope costs to study the stars. So that we can get an idea of it ..

lakhdar 


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#7 DrAstro

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Posted 09 April 2021 - 01:07 PM

I would proceed by trying to locate a researcher who is currently involved with stellar spectra. There might even be someone who is trying to do exactly what you propose (with their own set of stellar candidates). Adding one more star to the list is an easy thing. I have no idea, though, where to find out who might be doing such research.


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#8 Astrojensen

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Posted 09 April 2021 - 01:54 PM

 

 

I would like to know how much an observatory with a good telescope costs to study the stars. So that we can get an idea of it ..

lakhdar

If you mean a professional observatory, then I haven't got any idea of any precise numbers, but I know it's going to be very expensive, if you want an observatory with a spectrograph. Those things are VERY expensive. 

 

The size of the telescope is also a big factor, of course. The higher the resolution you want, the more light you're going to need, so the bigger the telescope needs to be. 

 

A guesstimate says that a 2-meter class telescope today would cost around $2-3,000,000. http://adsabs.harvar...ASPC...55....7A

 

It's just a guess, it could be more, depending on the location chosen for the observatory. A site with very good conditions is usually difficult to reach and tends to increase the cost dramatically. 

 

Don't forget the running costs for electricity, maintenance, regular updates on instrumentation, staff, etc. 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark


Edited by Astrojensen, 09 April 2021 - 01:56 PM.

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