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Doubles in Leo over 2 nights

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#1 flt158

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 08:09 AM

Hello, everyone.

 

I set up my William Optics 158 mm F/7 apochromatic refractor and its accompanying finder scope which is a William Optics 70 mm F/6 small apo in their usual place in my back garden on Monday night 5th April 2021 for 2 hours exactly.
Sunset had occurred at 20.07 local time.

I started observing at 9 pm and finished at 11 pm.

It was very cold. The air temperatures went down from -1 to -3 degrees Celsius. The wind was noticeable at about 20 km/h.

 

I observed these 6 easy doubles which can be checked out on www.stelldoppie.it .

 

These first 4 doubles I have observed in the past.

 

1. How can anyone not start with Regulus? But you may find that Alpha Leonis is a true binary as somewhat surprising. That's because the 2 stars are widely separated no matter what magnification any of us use.  Magnitudes: A = 1.4. B = 8.2. Separation (Sep) = 179.2". Position Angle (PA) = 304 degrees. As the night became darker, the B star was even visible in my William Optics 70 mm F/6 apo at a mere 11X. Regulus has a spectral class of B7. But I could see no colour whatsoever. Both stars look white to me in my main scope at 40X and 112X. B class stars are supposed to be blue.

 

2. This next double is by far the most famous in Leo. Algieba (Gamma Leonis) is a true binary and also known as STF 1424. Magnitudes: A = 2.4. B = 3.6. Sep = 4.7". PA = 126.6 degrees. Stunning sight at 112X as always. The 2 stars are of spectral class K. Therefore both stars should be orange - and indeed they are. I personally describe them as golden yellow.

 

3. Subra (Omicron Leonis) is an optical double. Magnitudes: A = 3.6. B = 10.8. Sep = 96.2". PA = 48 degrees. Plenty of dark space between the 2 stars - even at 40X. At 112X I could see that A is an F6 class yellow-white star. B is A1 class and is white.

 

4. 6 Leonis is a true binary which is also called SHJ 107. Magnitudes: A = 5.2. B = 9.3. Sep = 37.1". PA = 77 degrees. Very good split at 40X of course. But at 112X I could see A is of spectral class K3 and sure enough it is certainly orange. B is white. SHJ stands for 2 great astronomers from yesteryear: James South (1785-1867) and John Herschel (1792-1871) knew one another extremely well. They were both good friends and great observers of double stars.

 

These last 2 doubles I have never observed before. And what good and easy ones they are. Both were discovered by our most famous acquaintance Friedrich George Wilhelm Struve (1793-1864).

 

5. STF 1360 is a true binary. Magnitudes: A = 9. B = 8.9. Sep = 13.8". PA = 242 degrees. I had a delightful sight at 40X - even though both stars proved seriously faint. A is G class yellow and that was easy to see at 112X. B appeared white to me. I just couldn't notice any difference between their brightness. But I must say this double was well worth looking for.

 

6. To find my final double I thought I should simply take my time and star hop from the previous double STF 1360 and moving northwards by quite a number of degrees to reach STF 1364. I did find along the way an interesting asterism which I found to be very similar to a cross and is a reminder to me as to what Christ achieved by hanging on a real cross. This asterism had 3 stars going across its middle which reminded me of the 3 belt stars of Orion  STF 1364 is a true binary. Magnitudes: A = 8.6. B = 9.7. Sep = 16.4". PA = 155 degrees. As it is a slightly wider double than STF 1360 I knew there would be no hassle in splitting it at 40X also. It was also very nice at 112X. Both stars were white to yours truly.

 

Then last night, I set up once again my William Optics 158 mm F/7 apochromatic refractor and its accompanying WO 70 mm F/6 small apo in my own back garden on Saturday 10th April 2021 for 1.5 hours between 9 and 10.30 pm local time.

Sunset occurred at 20.16 local time.

Thankfully the wind wasn't strong at all - about 7 km/h from the northeast.

The air temperature was very cold at -2 degrees Celsius.
Some passing clouds passed by now and again but they kept moving on. 

 

I'm very much had planned to look for more doubles in Leo for this observing session.
And what a great time I had!
No less than 4 new doubles I successfully separated for the first time.

 

1. STT 216 is right next to the brighter 6.2 magnitude star 42 Leonis. The magnitudes of STT 216 are: A = 7.4. B = 10.3. Sep = 2.3". PA = 228 degrees. STT 216 is a true binary and I was thoroughly thrilled to see the very small dot of the secondary at a mere 112X right next to the primary in the correct position angle (PA). I was greatly surprised that even with a delta magnitude of 2.9 I could clearly see a tiny amount of black space between these 2 stars. The primary is G5 yellow. B is white. It also looked delightful at 140X. STT 216 was my new showpiece of the night for sure. STT stands for Otto Struve (1897-1963).

 

2. WAL 56 is a nice and easy true binary very near to Omicron Leonis. Magnitudes: A = 6.7. C = 10.7. Sep = 85.7". PA = 81 degrees. Very easy split at 40X of course with plenty of black space in between these 2 stars. WAL stands for Ake Wallenquist who was a well known Swedish astronomer and lived from 1904 to 1994. You may have noticed I used A and C for these. But what about the B star?

 

3. Well, the B star is part of the designation STT 204 which is an uncertain double. Magnitudes: A = 6.7. B = 10.7. Sep = 8.3". PA = 99 degrees. Of course the A star is the same star as the primary of WAL 56. But it took 112X to split STT 204 cleanly. However taking these WAL 56 and STT 204 together we have a rather nice triple star which my scope separated at 112X. And I highly recommend it to you.

 

4. STF (Struve) 1399 is a true binary a few degrees west of Gamma Leonis. Magnitudes: A = 7.7. B = 8.4. Sep = 30.2". PA = 176 degrees. Good clean split at 40X at first. At 112X I could see that A was G0 yellow. B was white. But wait a minute! I moved myself over to the WO 70 mm apo to discover there was a tiny section of black space between the 2 stars! I do keep a 28 mm 2 inch eyepiece in the small apo at all times. 11X is its magnification. This was, for sure, a super sight for yours truly. As north is up and the PA is at 176 degrees, the secondary was seen hanging straight down from the primary.

 

5. Lastly, I observed STTA 103 which is an optical double a very short distance from STF 1399. Magnitudes: A = 8.4. B = 9.6. Sep = 79.9". PA = 130 degrees. Not much to get excited about here. The secondary wasn't visible in the 70 mm apo. Therefore there was a good deal of separation at 40X between these 2 white stars in my main refractor. STTA stands for Otto Struve Supplement.  

 

I do thank you for reading my latest report.

 

Comments, corrections and images are very welcome.

 

By the way, this observing session was my 20th of 2021.

That's not bad at all - is it?

 

Clear skies from Aubrey.


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#2 SebastianTS

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 10:17 AM

Nice report, Aubrey waytogo.gif ! I haven't observed any of the doubles you describe. Except for Algieba. The yellow/orange colors are indeed impressive. However, I just can't get a nice view of this double, they look never completely separated. For my 6" Mak it should be quite easy, though. I guess I do need to cut my tube open one day to get rid of turbulence once and for all.

 

 

By the way, this observing session was my 20th of 2021.

That's not bad at all - is it?

That's a good number bow.gif .

I count 15 this year (including one two hour session at -9Ccoldday.gif   ).

 

CS, Sebastian 


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#3 dUbeni

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 10:51 AM

Great report flt158, I visit Regulus and Algieba often and did observe some others in Leo, just can't remember their names. 

 

... I just can't get a nice view of this double, they look never completely separated. For my 6" Mak it should be quite easy, though. I guess I do need to cut my tube open one day to get rid of turbulence once and for all.

 

CS, Sebastian 

That is in fact strange because I able to split easily with my 80mm, and even with the FL55SS, f/5.5 @ 121x, here is the sketch of Algieba trough the 55mm telescope: 

Bright double stars FL55SS part I
 
CS
Bernardo

 


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#4 flt158

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 11:58 AM

 

Great report flt158, I visit Regulus and Algieba often and did observe some others in Leo, just can't remember their names. 

 

That is in fact strange because I able to split easily with my 80mm, and even with the FL55SS, f/5.5 @ 121x, here is the sketch of Algieba trough the 55mm telescope: 

 
 
CS
Bernardo

 

 Hello Bernardo. 

 

I have always been a big admirer of each and every one of your sketches. 

They look very similar to real images. 

 

Your above sketch of Algieba is a joy to behold!

Thank you for giving it to us here. 

Both your scopes are very good indeed. waytogo.gif

 

Can I make a suggestion in regards to you remembering the names of double stars?

Please consider keeping a diary. laugh.gif

I have diaries going back to 1987 in my house. 

Okay - the old ones are up in the attic. 

 

But you might find it a great blessing in future years.  

 

Very best regards from Aubrey. 


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#5 flt158

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 12:15 PM

Nice report, Aubrey waytogo.gif ! I haven't observed any of the doubles you describe. Except for Algieba. The yellow/orange colors are indeed impressive. However, I just can't get a nice view of this double, they look never completely separated. For my 6" Mak it should be quite easy, though. I guess I do need to cut my tube open one day to get rid of turbulence once and for all.

That's a good number bow.gif .

I count 15 this year (including one two hour session at -9Ccoldday.gif   ).

 

CS, Sebastian 

Hello, Sebastian. 

 

I'm very much sorry you are having difficulties splitting Algieba (Gamma Leonis)

I wonder what magnification you might be using, my friend. 

 

I have one suggestion for you, Sebastian. 

 

Try and see where Gamma Leo is with your unaided eyes as it appears about 30 to 40 minutes after your local sunset. 

You probably see Regulus before that time as it is brighter.  

Then see if Algieba splits for you in a bright sky.

 

Before I successfully split at 112X, I'm using just 40X. 

At that magnification, the 2 stars are most certainly not separated. 

And I have no other eyepiece between those two I use - which is of no problem to me. 

Generally speaking, I will only go higher in magnification if I don't get a clean split.  

 

See the sketch above from Bernardo. 

He is splitting this star at 121X.  

 

I very much wish your the very best. 

Hopefully you will have good clear skies over south west Germany very soon. 

 

Aubrey. 



#6 payner

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 01:46 PM

Thoroughly enjoyed reading your recent observations in Leo, Aubrey. Congrats on two excellent refractors and the opportunity to compare the views together.

 

Regards,
Randy


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#7 dUbeni

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 01:49 PM

Hi Aubrey, I do take notes of what I've observed, but their all in loose sheets of paper, so it's a mess shocked.gif confused1.gif bawling.gif . My most organized observations are the sketchbooks.

 

Bernardo


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#8 flt158

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 02:56 PM

Thoroughly enjoyed reading your recent observations in Leo, Aubrey. Congrats on two excellent refractors and the opportunity to compare the views together.

 

Regards,
Randy

Thank you, Randy. 

That STF 1399 would be very impressive even in binoculars.  

 

We are supposed to have some clear nights over the coming week.

So hopefully I can find a few more doubles. 

 

Very best regards from Aubrey.  



#9 flt158

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 03:02 PM

Hi Aubrey, I do take notes of what I've observed, but their all in loose sheets of paper, so it's a mess shocked.gif confused1.gif bawling.gif . My most organized observations are the sketchbooks.

 

Bernardo

Hello again, Bernardo.

 

Maybe some types of folders which secures all your loose sheets of paper would work. 

 

I am currently putting some individual maps of certain constellations that way. 

 

But I sure am glad your have sketchbooks. waytogo.gif

 

Very best regards from Aubrey. 


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#10 payner

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 03:39 PM

Hi Aubrey: I especially appreciated the description of your observations as you star hoped to STF 1364. Whenever I see one, I always associate a cross asterism with Christ.

 

Regards,

Randy


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#11 SebastianTS

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 03:29 AM

Thank you for the sketch, Bernardo. It helps me to get a feeling for what to expect. I didn't look through many scopes in the past, so maybe my expectations are too high. Anyway, I can clearly see the two components of Algieba as separate stars. But there is no black line between them, just the overlapping blurred edges of the stars. I have this problem with every bright star, and if two bright stars are close, it just doesn't look good. Seeing is usually not good at my location so I guess bright stars are always an issue. The Tak FS-102 of my friend (the only reference scope I have) shows always better images even if side by side at equal seeing conditions. That leads me to the conclusion that I have turbulence in the tube. If you have other explanations, they are very welcome.
Aubrey, I use 90x and 144x most of the time. For tight ones sometimes 180x. At 90x the image is usually still very nice. If I go higher, the issue I described occurs.

CS, Sebastian
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#12 R Botero

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 03:54 AM

Great report Aubrey!  When it's been clear over here in SE England, it's so cold and the seeing has not been great.  You have kept the good seeing in Dublin! wink.gif

 

Roberto


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#13 c2m2t

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 11:09 AM

Hi Aubrey!

Once again, a great couple of nights observing and a wonderfully detailed report...thanks for sharing! Most of these, I have already processed. I have added a few additional bits to the image to follow your reporting as well as identify additional components found in the WDS. I'll break them up into two groups to coincide with your targets on each night. 

 

One note on STF 1424, Algieba; the DSS image available in Stelle Doppie indicated a faint pair of mag. 14+ stars in the general location of the "F" component and SD places the reference dot smack in the middle. Doing separation and PA checks using Aladin did not confirm which star is the more likely "F" so, using Aladin I called up the NOMAD survey data and the Vmag for both stars is available. Based on that, It is my assertion that the correct companion star is the more westerly of the two. It would be great to hear from someone with a big dob to see if this pair of embers are resolvable. 

 

This batch includes the following: STFB 6 (Regulus), STF 1424 (Algieba), H VI 76 (Subra), SHJ 107, STF 1360 and STF 1364.

One final note on STF 1364...there is a "C" companion at mag. 12.48, 2x+ the AB separation to the northwest which is catalogued as HJ 466AC.

 

Cheers, Chris.

Attached Thumbnails

  • STFB 6-9017-ns-Notes.jpg
  • STF 1424-9061-pt-ns-ID-Notes.jpg
  • H VI 76, Omicron Leo-8632-ns-Label.jpg
  • SHJ 107,6 Leo-8614-ns-Label.jpg
  • STF 1360-8605-ns-Label.jpg
  • STF 1364 & HJ 466-8608-ns-Label.jpg

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#14 c2m2t

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 12:04 PM

Greetings once again!

Just a short delay getting out the second batch...lunch was being served!! grin.gif

 

This group we have three images covering four systems...Aubrey...you had me scrabbling trying to find WAL 56. It was not until I had completely exhausted my archive, that I finally checked Stelle Doppie to find WAL 56AC was part of the STT 204 system.

 

Systems attached include STT 204AB + WAL 56AC, STF 1399 and STTA 103.

 

Cheers, Chris.

Attached Thumbnails

  • STT 204-8626-pt-ns-ID-Notes.jpg
  • STF 1399-9000-pt-ns-ID.jpg
  • STTA 103-8983-ns-Label.jpg

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#15 dUbeni

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 12:16 PM

Hi Chris, very impressive photos as usual, I'm just wondering why Algieba doesn't show as a pair...

 

Hello again, Bernardo.

 

Maybe some types of folders which secures all your loose sheets of paper would work. 

 

I am currently putting some individual maps of certain constellations that way. 

 

But I sure am glad your have sketchbooks. waytogo.gif

 

Very best regards from Aubrey. 

Well, Aubrey, they are stored on a small plastic case waiting for some kind of proper organization, I will have to rewrite a lot of them. I'm a bit more disciplined when sketching cool.gif

 

 

Thank you for the sketch, Bernardo. It helps me to get a feeling for what to expect. I didn't look through many scopes in the past, so maybe my expectations are too high. Anyway, I can clearly see the two components of Algieba as separate stars. But there is no black line between them, just the overlapping blurred edges of the stars. I have this problem with every bright star, and if two bright stars are close, it just doesn't look good. Seeing is usually not good at my location so I guess bright stars are always an issue. The Tak FS-102 of my friend (the only reference scope I have) shows always better images even if side by side at equal seeing conditions. That leads me to the conclusion that I have turbulence in the tube. If you have other explanations, they are very welcome.
Aubrey, I use 90x and 144x most of the time. For tight ones sometimes 180x. At 90x the image is usually still very nice. If I go higher, the issue I described occurs.

CS, Sebastian

Hi Sebastian, maybe you should try cooling the 6" Mak upside down, open focuser up with a lady transparent sock secured with a rubber band to prevent dust. This is just an idea...

 

Bernardo


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#16 c2m2t

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 12:36 PM

Hi Bernardo and Thanks!

I did take a series of images with reducing exposure times and was finally able to get a differentiation of the close pair. Because the AB pair is so bright, using my normal exposure settings to capture the available field stars accessible to average backyard scopes, I can only resolve a single star for the AB pair. undecided.gif smile.gif

 

Cheers, Chris


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#17 flt158

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 12:49 PM

Excellent images here yet again, Chris!

 

Thank you each and everyone of them. 

 

I have to say: isn't your Regulus main primary look a little green? lol.gif 

As I stated above, it's supposed to be a B class star. 

Which implies it ought to have a bit of a blue tint. 

However seeing neither you or me got a blue tint, Chris, I feel justified. lol.gif

And I'm a Irishman who has never observed a green star! rofl2.gif

 

By the way, for those of you who have read my report, I should have also said that I do consider STF 1399 as an excellent test for users of binoculars. 

Especially as I got a lovely view of it at 11X. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 


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#18 flt158

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 12:51 PM

Quote: Well, Aubrey, they are stored on a small plastic case waiting for some kind of proper organization, I will have to rewrite a lot of them. I'm a bit more disciplined when sketching cool.

 

Good man, Bernardo! waytogo.gif

 

Please keep up the great work with your sketches!

 

Very best regards from Aubrey.



#19 Magnus Ahrling

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 01:22 PM

Hello Sebastian!

 

Strange you find it hard to get a clear seperation of Algieba with your 6" Mak. Your sketch of Theta Aurigae (mars31) in your "First time sketching:STF982" post shows your Mak can deliver! I indeed find Algieba far easier to split than Theta in my 6" Mak (MK66). Well when seeing is decent. Have you checked collimation? Just a thought but I doubt your Mak has that issue as you can get such a fine split of Theta!

 

/Magnus


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#20 Magnus Ahrling

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 03:00 PM

Hallo Aubrey!

 

Yet another nice and inspiraring reports. Thankswaytogo.gif 20 obs this year. Congratulations. I have 14...

 

I can`t resist to mention two intressting but not all that easy doubles while we are in Leo. Iota and Omega. Not really charming but I find their challange charming. Omega Leo slowly widening, it now has a 0,9" sep.  and mag 5.7-7.2.

This year, 16/2, I split Omega with my old orange vintage C8 (mounted on a Vixen GP) in 384X and 512X. Good seeing 8P. No colours noted. 

 

Iota Leo also a charmig challange and also widening, now 2.2" sep. mag. 4.1-6.7, split the same excellent night with the C8 at 256X. Sometimes I imagine B as bluishconfused1.gif

 

21/2 was a decent night,6-7P, and I cought a split if Iota with the MK66 Mak (+Vixen GP) at 200 and 225X.

 

In my opinion these doubles need really good seeing for succes. But when seeing do co-operate I did have a split of Iota Leo 2017 in mars with my C80ED refractor; "23/3 at 133X I saw B as a "bump" on A, at 160X the pair was touching and also at 208X. At 240X I had a classic split. Nothing was gained at 288X." (from my log) So sometimes small aperture does rule.

 

 

Clear Skies!

 

Magnus


Edited by Magnus Ahrling, 12 April 2021 - 03:14 PM.

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#21 flt158

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 05:15 PM

Hello Magnus. 

 

Yesterday I was posting to a Danish spectroscopist. 

Now I'm talking to you a Swede!

It's fascinating what Scandinavian astronomers we end up talking to on Cloudy Nights!! smile.gif 

 

Please forgive me; but I have observed Iota Leonis quite a number of times in recent years. 

So I don't think I will be observing this year. 

2 or 3 years ago I was splitting it at a mere 112X. 

I would recommend it to anyone - especially a beginner to double stars. 

 

But, hey, only today I was checking out Omega Leonis. 

Therefore the next clear night I get, it's definitely on the menu. 

I am aiming to try and split before it gets fully dark. 

That might prove all the better for my scope. 

 

Please watch this space, Magnus!

If I do succeed, it could be one of my best observations of 2021. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 


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#22 c2m2t

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 09:11 PM

Good Evening Everyone!

To follow up on the Image of Algieba (STF 1424) above in my earlier reply, I have added a cropped wide-field image that did resolve the two mag. 14+ stars, one of which is the "F" companion. It may assist those with the light buckets as they try to resolve this pair.

 

Cheers, Chris

Attached Thumbnails

  • Algieba, STF 1424-5099-crop-Notes.jpg

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#23 SebastianTS

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Posted 13 April 2021 - 02:01 AM

Hello Sebastian!

 

Strange you find it hard to get a clear seperation of Algieba with your 6" Mak. Your sketch of Theta Aurigae (mars31) in your "First time sketching:STF982" post shows your Mak can deliver! I indeed find Algieba far easier to split than Theta in my 6" Mak (MK66). Well when seeing is decent. Have you checked collimation? Just a thought but I doubt your Mak has that issue as you can get such a fine split of Theta!

 

/Magnus

Hello Magnus,

 

thank you for the comments, it's good to hear from a fellow MK-66 owner smile.gif. Well, the sketch does unfortunately not exactly represent what I saw through the eyepiece. My sketching experience is yet limited undecided.gif. So I could see the B component of θ Aurigae, but it was not separated by a black line (as indicated by the sketch). I basically sketched the centers of the stars only. In fact, it took me a while of observing until I could clearly see B. Usually dim stars appear more like a dot than bright ones. I guess that makes Algieba look not so good.

As for collimation, I got that done professionally about 15 years ago and I tried it myself a couple of months ago.  The image of a defocused star looks as it should for me (could still be not quite OK, though, I don't have any experience in collimation).

As for cooling, I put the scope outside at least one hour before I start observing and I mount it with the backside up as Bernardo suggested during cooldown. 

I'm curious, do you use any fans on your MK-66? Or does it cool well without? Currently I only use insulating foil around the tube but I'm not sure if it changes anything. 

 

CS, Sebastian 


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#24 c2m2t

c2m2t

    Viking 1

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Posted 13 April 2021 - 09:44 AM

Hi Sebastien!

You may want to check out this video on Youtube. It provides a very detailed method for collimating a Mak-Cass. I would suggest that you do not need a artificial star generator as described in the video. Tin foil stretched tightly over the business end of an LED flashlight with a pin-hole centered on the flashlight lens is equally as effective. Unlike and SCT for which you are adjusting the secondary mirror, with the Mak-Cass you are adjusting the primary mirror. I have no idea if there are "Bob's Knobs" for Mak-Cass scopes.

 

Here is the main video:   https://www.youtube....v=OlFf1GC70OA  

 

Might be an idea to watch this one first:  https://www.youtube....v=vMkURZdJ84Q  

It provides a method to make an inexpensive artificial star.

 

Don't start collimating until you are comfortable with the process. There are several other videos and likely some written instructions with pictures available online...just need to do some surfing!! grin.gif

 

Cheers, Chris.


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#25 Magnus Ahrling

Magnus Ahrling

    Ranger 4

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  • Loc: Visby, Gotland, Sweden 57:30N.

Posted 13 April 2021 - 12:32 PM

Hallo again Sebastian!

 

Just like you I find it nice to hear from a fellow MK66 user. Great scope! Perfect for double stars!! Now than, regarding collimation you can collimate it just like a SCT. All Intes and Intes Micro Maks use a Rumak system which mean their Maks (like MK66) have Primary mirrors and secondary mirrors collimatable. Indeed a very smart thing. All other Maks, that I know of anyway, are Gregory systems, meaning they have just an aluminized dot on meniscus.

I have had my MK66 since -09 I have done slight collimations 3 times since than. Last collimtion was done -15. MK66 holds collimation extremely well  -no need for Bobs Knobs. I have never collimated the primary mirror only the secondary. 

 

No I don`t have any fan. I take my MK66 out 1-1,5h before observing.

 

Now I am moving Aubrys thread away from the subject. Go to "Cass and Maks" forum here on CN. I am sure you can get info and help you may need there. Its a fantastic place!

 

Here is a nice link if you want some more info on MK66 https://www.cloudyni...ntes-mk66-r1545

 

Clear Skies!

Magnus

 

PS Sebastian.. If you want more info about my experience regarding MK66  -just pm me.smile.gif


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