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#1 T~Stew

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 09:19 PM

Call me old fashioned, but I like looking at charts and maps... I mean physical ones. I have the ol spin the wheel Celestron spiral bound guide to the stars, as well as single disk "Guide to the stars". These are great to learn the constellations and some of the most popular clusters, galaxy, and nebula. But rather lacking on the DSO even the more popular ones.

 

Is there anything that has more galaxy and nebula on it? Like all of the popular ones and then some? I really would like to see it all on one cohesive map, ideally circular projection.

 

For example in the Guide to the Stars more DSOs are on this than the celestron map... but look near the big dipper and nothing around M101 or M52... yet just to the south M64 is labeled? I'd really like to see more/all possible targets at least larger ones more for beginners with less than 1,000mm fl. Maybe I'll just mark up the one I have, if the coated paper will take ink.

 

Anything exist out there like that? I know I can see these on apps I'm just wondering about a map or chart. Wasn't sure what forum to put this in, but I'm specifically interested in all the objects that one can image (at least without a very powerful telescope).

 

 



#2 Dynan

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 09:25 PM

Look up 'planisphere'.

 

Here's some from our sponsor, Astronomics:

 

https://www.astronom.../?q=planisphere


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#3 fewayne

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 09:30 PM

I can very heartily recommend Charlie Bracken's The Astrophotography Sky Atlas. It starts with a nice list of 93 objects, sorted by culmination throughout the year (e.g. now is a great time to hunt the  Whale and Hockey Stick), and has page after  page after page of maps  with stars, nebulae, galaxies, etc.

 

It is  most definitely  not  one map but there  are  some overview maps showing  the  distribution  of various kinds of targets throughout the sky.


Edited by fewayne, 11 April 2021 - 09:33 PM.

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#4 Jim T

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 10:00 PM

I'm a fan of both the S&T Pocket Sky Atlas (which probably meets 90% of my needs) and my copy of the Herald-Bobroff Astro Atlas.  The H-B goes super-deep for a print atlas.


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#5 ButterFly

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 10:04 PM

I can see everything in Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas with a 15".  Even a modest refractor would get most if not all.  But it's geared toward the visual observer, as most paper charts are.  +1 for Bracken for being geared toward imaging, but nowhere near as deep.


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#6 bobzeq25

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Posted 11 April 2021 - 10:52 PM

For an imager Bracken's, recommended above, is by far the best.  And I have a _large_ bookshelf.  <smile>

 

You want targets?

 

416 emission nebulae and supernova remnants, including the complete Sharpless (Sh2) and RCW catalogs.
171 reflection nebulae, including the complete van den Bergh (vdB) catalog.
146 planetary nebulae, including the complete Abell catalog
52 dark nebulae and molecular clouds
792 galaxies (larger than 3 arcminutes)
38 galaxy groups from the Abell and Hickson catalogs
108 globular clusters (larger than 5 arcminutes)
309 open clusters (larger than 5 arcminutes)

 

And a wealth of information about them, extremely useful for an imager.

 

It's an essential resource, it would take a lot of time to get the information off the Internet.  While some of them require large scopes, and experience imaging, the 2000 targets are far more than most people will ever do.

 

https://www.amazon.c...n/dp/1517687802


Edited by bobzeq25, 11 April 2021 - 10:59 PM.

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#7 T~Stew

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 09:15 AM

Thanks fellas, great options! I have a birthday coming up some one of these will be on my list. Bracken's looks really good to me so far!

 

I don't imagine that what I am really looking for exists... a map with it all on one piece. Its certainly easier to concentrate on one area and go into more detail, in pages of a book. But I just like to see the big picture, where things are relative to one another, I suppose as I learn the constellations and stars better I'll be able to look at one of the smaller slices of the sky and know right where it is, but for now I like the charts that show the whole sky at once (or at least a significant chunk at once). I may try to make one myself...scan in one of these charts and enlarge and print a mosaic on say 6x 11x17 sheets and then simply fill in a couple hundred of the most popular nebula and galaxy etc. I could do most of it at work on slow nightshifts...



#8 Madratter

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 10:44 AM

I have a pretty deep book shelf of atlases + quite a few planetarium programs.

 

I agree with both the Bracken book sited above for astrophotography & the Sky and Telescope Pocket Atlas also sited above for just general use. Both are close to can't miss. If you like Atlases, as I do, you'll get other stuff too, but you won't regret having these.


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#9 Islander13

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 05:29 PM

I found this spiral bound book by Terrence Dickinson, with handy charts for DSO at a used book store, and it has become my goto reference guide.

 

https://www.amazon.c...e/dp/B008GASYMW

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#10 ButterFly

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Posted 13 April 2021 - 04:28 PM

 

I don't imagine that what I am really looking for exists... a map with it all on one piece.

That's one huge piece of paper.  Google Sky comes the closest, but not on paper.
 




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