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Celesteron CB1000CF microscope

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#1 ryansmonacles20

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Posted 16 April 2021 - 05:06 PM

Anyone with experience or advice would be appreciated. I’m wandering if this is a good baseline kit or if it’s overkill. 
binocular

condenser

1000x 

Fine and coarse 

Mechanical stage 

 

How do I know if it meets the (DIN 160?) standard? 
Can I use the same 5 MP imager I use with my telescope?

How far can this power on this scope go?

 

Are the features I listed really that important considering I can get this power at a lower price. It’s the bells and whistles of the knobs etc. that I’m paying for. 
 

Thanks. 


Edited by ryansmonacles20, 16 April 2021 - 05:12 PM.


#2 Stan Lopata

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Posted 18 April 2021 - 01:48 PM

Ryan,

If you're looking for a first microscope, there are a lot of low cost monocular scopes around these days.  These have good optics and you can get a scope with substage light, condenser with iris diaphragm, 3 objectives usually 4x, 10x and 40x, course and fine focusing, 10x eyepiece, mechanical stage, etc, etc.  You can find these for $50 or less.  I guess the point I want to make is start inexpensive to see if you like using a microscope or if it's just something you want to try.  And, don't be overly thrilled with "power."  As with telescopes, more power is often "empty magnification."  I've had microscopes my whole life and even though my scopes have that 100x objective, I almost never use it.  I would much rather use a 15x eyepiece or 25x eyepiece along with the 40x objective to increase power.

Just a few thoughts,

Stan



#3 PatrickVt

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Posted 19 April 2021 - 04:17 AM

Anyone with experience or advice would be appreciated. I’m wandering if this is a good baseline kit or if it’s overkill. 
binocular

condenser

1000x 

Fine and coarse 

Mechanical stage 

 

How do I know if it meets the (DIN 160?) standard? 
Can I use the same 5 MP imager I use with my telescope?

How far can this power on this scope go?

 

Are the features I listed really that important considering I can get this power at a lower price. It’s the bells and whistles of the knobs etc. that I’m paying for. 
 

Thanks. 

I have one of the higher end Celestron Labs trinocular microscopes.  I'm not at my microscope at the moment but I think it's the CB2000C.

 

I agree with what Stan wrote, above.  Forget about magnification.  You'll want to be in the 40-400x range for most specimens.  Anything higher with these optics and you are into hollow magnification.  

 

My model does use the DIN 160 standard objectives.  The photo of the model you asked about does seem to show DIN 160 also but...  I can't be absolutely certain just by a photo.  I quickly replaced my objectives with PLAN objectives because I found the Celestron achro objectives to be frustratingly blurry as you approached the edges of the frame.  This was a very worthwhile upgrade.

 

The stage is good...  Abbe condenser is nice...  fine focus is nice....  I found the lighting to be a bit on the weak side and the eyepieces to be a!most useless (just like most beginner kit telescope eyepieces).  I purchased a brighter bulb for brighter lighting and I purchased far better eyepieces.  The search for those was long and a bit frustrating.

 

Honestly, I am now happy with this microscope but I would not say there are any fancy bells and whistles with these Celestron microscopes.  It is a pretty basic lightfield microscope.

 

For imaging, I'd recommend using your astro camera only for astro-imaging.  First, I don't know how you would get it to work with microscopy software (I couldn't figure out a solution for my QHY178 nor did I care for the resulting images anyway).  Also, astro cameras are designed for exceptionally low light scenes but lightfield microscopes provide bright, well-illuminated scenes.  I purchased Celestron's 10mp microscope imager...  I really disliked it though.  It captured odd varying color casts across the frame and I found the tiny Aptina sensor to be too low a quality for my tastes.  I now use my Sony a6000 on the trinocular.  The images I get from the Sony camera are far better than anything else I've tried.  It is easier to use too.

 

If I were to start over today, I'd probably go to Amscope at a minimum.  I'd look for PLAN objectives on a four or five objective turret...  lightfield/darkfield combo...  don't worry about high magnification...  trinocular head (makes imaging far easier)...  and, unlike Celestron, Amscope provides a wide range of upgrade parts and accessories for their microscopes.  Keep in mind, however, I've been interested in microscopy since my school days many decades ago so I already knew I wanted a decent microscope.  If unsure about the hobby, there are some decent sub-$100 monocular microscopes to try.  Plus if you get a portable smaller battery operated one, it could complement a far better upgraded bino/trino if and when you decide to upgrade.  

 

Patrick



#4 PatrickVt

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Posted 19 April 2021 - 09:12 AM

I checked my model microscope this morning.  I do have the Celestron Labs CB2000C.   After looking at the photos of the CB1000CF on my desktop computer this morning, I believe the model that I have is probably a bit larger, physically, than the CB1000CF.  I purposely purchased the larger body because I liked the rubber gripped objective turret.  The focusing knobs seem to be significantly larger on my model as well.  

 

According to the specs on Celestron's website, the CB1000CF does indeed have DIN 160 objectives so that is good.  I know some of the sub-$100 beginner scopes do not have swappable objectives but, then again, those microscopes aren't meant for upgrading.  

 

I should also correct an error in my previous post about the Celestron Microscope Imager.  I wrote that I had a 10mp one but I checked this morning and it is the 5mp one that I have.  They don't even make a 10mp one!  Regardless of image size, I didn't like that camera which, I assume, is due to the old and tiny Aptina sensor.  The Celestron software for it is rather quirky too.  If you have a cellphone, I suspect that would produce far better images than the Celestron Imager.  

 

As I wrote, above, I replaced my objectives with PLAN objectives, I replaced the bulb, I replaced the eyepieces and I added a more appropriate trinocular adapter tube that works better for my particular camera.  These upgrades probably doubled my initial microscope cost (or a bit more) plus I wasted money on that Celestron Microscope Imager.  On the positive side, I can always use my new eyepieces and objectives in a new microscope but I probably would not because I would keep this one as is for the grandchildren to use.  

 

I have no regrets about purchasing this Celestron Labs microscope but I knew I would be interested in this hobby.  If, after spending all that money, I found that I don't really have any interest in microscopy, I'd regret my purchase and wish I had just started small.  In my case, I really should have gone for a microscope in the $750-1000 range right from the start.  

 

Would you be happy with the CB1000CF?  I can't judge that.  Part of it depends on your budget.  Part of it depends on your expectations for imaging quality.   Part of it depends on your desired specimens.  Part of it depends on which direction you want to go in microscopy.  Part of it depends on your experience level with microscopes.  

 

What I can recommend is a pretty good source of additional information about microscopes and microscopy.  On YouTube, a guy who goes by Microbehunter Microscopy has a lot of informative videos.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Patrick




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