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Monkey Head Nebula

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#1 Emanuel

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Posted 17 April 2021 - 09:00 AM

Monkey Head Nebula, NGC 2174 and sh2-247.Taka 106, NikonD5300, RST 135, L-Enhance Filter. 20X300 ", Iso 400 and calibration photos. BackyardNikon, PHD2, DSS, Pixinsight, TopazDenoise and Photoshop. :)

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#2 boxcorner

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Posted 17 April 2021 - 03:05 PM

I had difficulty decrypting your description. So, after a little research, I now know that a Taka 106 is an astrograph and an RST 135 is a mount. Impressive sounding kit you've got there. I'm just a beginner who knows next to nothing, so still just toddling. I'm surprised that you didn't need to take more light frames, of shorter duration.


Edited by boxcorner, 18 April 2021 - 06:53 AM.

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#3 Emanuel

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Posted 17 April 2021 - 05:41 PM

Hey friend, how's going? Sorry for my description. You know, we try to make our descriptions shorter and so, instead of saying Takahashi FSQ 106 ED, we just say Taka 106 and generally everybody knows what scope we are talking about, even more that this scope is one of the most wanted scopes for astrophotography. And the same goes for the mount, the RST 135 is the RainbowAstro RST 135, so, same thing.As for the light frames, the more, the better. And if you can have long exposures, the better. Not short ones. There are some exceptions. For example, if you shoot the Orion Nebula, besides long exposures, you will also need very short ones, because the nebula's core is very bright and you need to process both sets of exposures, the long ones and the short ones, and then combine them, so you can expose that bright core.
In my case, in not doing so much exposures, and that is mostly due to the scope im using. The Takahashi FSQ 106 ED, is probably, if not the best, one of the best 4"scopes that you can use, and even that im only doing sets of 10 to 20 lights, its enough to expose the objects im shooting. And if take a look, im doing 300 seconds exposures.And also, on the description i said 20X300" , plus calibration photos. Those calibration photos are the photos that we take, to take care of all the imperfections on the main exposures, such as noise, hot and cold pixels, smudges, sattelite trails and so on. On this photo i have 20 dark frames with 300" each, 20 bias frames, with 1/4000" each, and 20 flat frames, with 1/10" each. Each of these set of exposures is meant to deal with one of the cosmetic problem that i describe. So, if you combine all exposures, you end up with a couple of hours. And then you combine all of them on a specific programme, like Deep Sky Stacker, or DSS for short, and you process the final stack that this programme produce.😊

Edited by Emanuel, 17 April 2021 - 05:53 PM.


#4 boxcorner

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Posted 18 April 2021 - 06:59 AM

Many thanks for the in-depth explanation. Much appreciated.


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#5 Emanuel

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Posted 18 April 2021 - 11:36 AM

Youre welcome 😊


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