Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Jupiter Northern Hemisphere this year

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 smiles233

smiles233

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 34
  • Joined: 21 May 2020
  • Loc: upstate ny

Posted 17 April 2021 - 12:06 PM

I was looking at Jupiter at opposition in upstate New York and it looks like it will be lower in the sky than last year 33 degrees Maybe. Is this correct? When I looked ahead to next year look like it will be at 48 degrees and higher



#2 Tangerman

Tangerman

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 276
  • Joined: 03 Mar 2020
  • Loc: Atlanta, Georgia

Posted 17 April 2021 - 12:27 PM

Looks to me like it'll be about 8 degrees higher this year than last year. But still pretty low. Next year it will be significantly higher, continuing to get higher for a couple years afterwards. 


  • Illinois, payner and Redbetter like this

#3 Redbetter

Redbetter

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10,613
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Central Valley, CA

Posted 17 April 2021 - 12:36 PM

Jupiter was near its lowest at opposition last year.  It will be higher in the sky this year and higher again for the next several.


  • payner likes this

#4 smiles233

smiles233

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 34
  • Joined: 21 May 2020
  • Loc: upstate ny

Posted 17 April 2021 - 02:38 PM

Great thanks 



#5 sanbai

sanbai

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 930
  • Joined: 18 May 2019
  • Loc: Baton Rouge, LA

Posted 17 April 2021 - 03:03 PM

Declination of Jupiter at opposition according to Skysafari:
-21° 54' in 2020-07-14
-13° 34' in 2021-08-19
-0 ° 01' in 2022-09-26 (crossing the celestial equator N ->S few hours before opposition!)

Jupiter is/was some degrees northern before the listed opposition

Edited by sanbai, 17 April 2021 - 03:04 PM.

  • Dave Mitsky likes this

#6 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 96,346
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 18 April 2021 - 06:53 PM

The web page at https://www.astroima...date=2021-08-20 shows how Jupiter will increase and decrease in size and brightness this year.  After the 2022 opposition, Jupiter will be smaller and a bit fainter with each successive opposition until the 2030 opposition.



#7 ButterFly

ButterFly

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,012
  • Joined: 07 Sep 2018

Posted 24 April 2021 - 06:35 PM

Watching things unfold at high speed is a very helpful tool to understand both solar system motions, and how Earth's motion affects the way those motions appear against the stars.  There is a cycle, so it's impossible to tell where you are on it without also looking at the surrounding years.  If you happen to know the extremes of the cycle beforehand, then you can know whether you are there or not.

 

In Stellarium, turn off the ground and daylight options, turn on EQ mode, center on Jupiter, then let the time run forward very quickly.  Turning on the ecliptic guide line helps a lot.  You can also turn on its path (rather than its orbit) to watch epicycles.  Same with the other planets.  Give them a good watch at very high speed.  Saturn's rings' tilt cycle, and resonance of moons are other fun things to watch.

 

Unfortunately, the native GUI of Stellarium can't adjust the time step, only it's speed.  Redshift would let me select time steps of a synodic period of the selected target, for example.  That's a very, very useful tool, but needs scripting for Stellarium to do it.  If someone has or knows of such a script, please share.


  • EverlastingSky likes this

#8 Stewc14

Stewc14

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 110
  • Joined: 10 Jan 2019
  • Loc: Pueblo West colorado

Posted 28 April 2021 - 06:08 AM

I can tell you that the image sucks here in Colorado. 
pushed the big refractor out and started with 8 mm, boiling away, then 10, then 14 and still won’t produce a good image . So I’ll go out and try 18.2 in an hour. Waited all winter,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,I’ve been disappointed before. Looks to be 17 to 20 degrees. Maybe a few more degrees will improve the image.



#9 ButterFly

ButterFly

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,012
  • Joined: 07 Sep 2018

Posted 28 April 2021 - 01:27 PM

I can tell you that the image sucks here in Colorado. 
pushed the big refractor out and started with 8 mm, boiling away, then 10, then 14 and still won’t produce a good image . So I’ll go out and try 18.2 in an hour. Waited all winter,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,I’ve been disappointed before. Looks to be 17 to 20 degrees. Maybe a few more degrees will improve the image.

Try just before sunrise.  It's about 30 degrees up for 35N at sunrise.  Jupiter can be pushed rather far into twilight, and gets to about 35 degrees an hour after.




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics