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observing sites for Solar eclipse of 2021-06-10

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#1 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 04:31 PM

Where is everyone observing the Solar eclipse of 2021-06-10 from?

 

Even in the Path of Annularity, this will be an very difficult eclipse to observe from most locations in America, since the eclipse begins before Sunrise, and ends less than one hour after Sunrise.  Most locations in America will require an east-facing unobstructed view of less than ten degrees in altitude angle (and zero degrees or less at the beginning of the eclipse).  I figure the best observing sites will be from very high locations (top of a mountain or a tall building) or facing east over a large body of water (ocean, bay, or great lake).

 

https://en.wikipedia...f_June_10,_2021

 

https://www.timeandd...ar/2021-june-10

 

I don't have a passport to travel outside of the USA, and I probably don't want to travel outside of Maryland for a partial partial eclipse, but if you know of publicly accessible observing sites that you have confirmed as being unobstructed for this eclipse, please list them here.  Note that the observing site must be accessible at night (many public locations are not) since you will need to arrive before Sunrise in order to be ready for when the eclipse begins at Sunrise.  I would recommend arriving at least an hour before Sunrise.  Note that a zero or negative altitude angle will have a significant King deviation, which must be accounted for in order for tracking systems to work.

 

In general, Solar observing is best done when overlooking water or plants, when the telescope is set up on grass (not pavement or sand), and outside of urban areas.

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  • SE2021Jun10A.png

Edited by Nicole Sharp, 20 April 2021 - 04:47 PM.

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#2 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 04:37 PM

I use two methods to measure the altitude angle of the horizon.

 

The first is best done in the afternoon, with the Sun behind you.  I use a compass to find the correct azimuth for Sunrise on June 10, 2021 (accounting for magnetic declination).  Then I point a telescope with a magnetic tube in the direction of the azimuth and find the horizon in the eyepiece.  With a magnetic inclinometer attached to the side of the magnetic tube, I can then pan back and forth along the horizon, checking the altitude angle on the inclinometer.

 

https://www.harborfr...nder-34214.html

 

https://www.harborfr...auge-63615.html

 

The second method is to take an unfiltered wide-angle photo of Sunrise, and then cross-reference the position of Sol on the date/time of the photo with the position of Sol on June 10, 2021 (using Stellarium).  Easiest way to do this is to count the number of Solar angular diameters along the horizon that correspond to the difference in azimuth angle.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 20 April 2021 - 04:39 PM.

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#3 siriusandthepup

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 04:54 PM

Nicole,

 

I love your enthusiasm.

 

For that eclipse - do your best to observe in your neighborhood. Don't spend funds to travel for this eclipse. It is an annular eclipse - not a total solar eclipse.

 

An annular is interesting, but not worthy of a lot of expenditure for travel.

 

Save your money for the eclipse of 2024. That will be entirely worthwhile to make travel plans. Come to Texas - we will be glad to have you here.

 

Stay in San Antonio and travel the 2/3 hours north to get on centerline (like Kerrville). That should be a spectacle. 5 min of totality with the sun almost directly overhead. As long as the weather cooperates you will have a lifetime memory. I have seen 2 totals and a number of annular eclipses. The total solar eclipses are the "E" ticket ride.

 

good luck!!


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#4 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 20 April 2021 - 05:03 PM

Nicole,

 

I love your enthusiasm.

 

For that eclipse - do your best to observe in your neighborhood. Don't spend funds to travel for this eclipse. It is an annular eclipse - not a total solar eclipse.

 

An annular is interesting, but not worthy of a lot of expenditure for travel.

 

Save your money for the eclipse of 2024. That will be entirely worthwhile to make travel plans. Come to Texas - we will be glad to have you here.

 

Stay in San Antonio and travel the 2/3 hours north to get on centerline (like Kerrville). That should be a spectacle. 5 min of totality with the sun almost directly overhead. As long as the weather cooperates you will have a lifetime memory. I have seen 2 totals and a number of annular eclipses. The total solar eclipses are the "E" ticket ride.

 

good luck!!

Yes, the distance I am willing to travel is definitely proportional to how dismal the eclipse in June 2021 will be.  I don't have very high hopes, but after my experience in 2017, I have been preparing for this partial partial eclipse for five years now, and am hoping for it to be a practice run for full annularity in 2023 (and yes definitely need to save up travel funds to get from Maryland to Texas).

 

The main issue for June 2021 is finding unobstructed observing sites.  This eclipse will not be visible from most locations, and most people (unless you live on the coast) will need to travel to see it at all, despite partiality in the USA being visible from South Dakota to South Carolina, simply to find a location that does not have obstructions on the horizon.  All locations in Maryland for example will require an unobstructed view of less than 7 degrees in altitude angle, and less than 8 degrees at most.  This is very difficult to find unless overlooking water or on top of a mountain or tall building.  If people can share publicly accessible observing sites they've found that they know will be unobstructed, that allows for people to have alternate sites to go to in case of clouds.

 

It should be noted also that an eclipse at Sunrise is rare in that it is the only Solar eclipse that can be viewed naked eye, though proper Solar gear should still always be used for safety.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 20 April 2021 - 05:09 PM.

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#5 emh52

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Posted 21 April 2021 - 08:53 PM

check out  https://skyandtelesc...eclipse-flight/   they have open seats, not cheap.

 

The issue for this eclipse is getting into Canada is impossible, I was going to try for Baffin Island but not happening, for the few who were going to try for greenland it is not happening as it is closed.

 

The eclipse is over very sparsely inhabited area (20k or so people), cloud prospects are not good across the track. The airplane group could be the only observers if the weather is unkind.

 

If you are happy with a partial I would suggest a location where the eclipse rises over water (Maine 75% is a good prospect) take a photo with something in the foreground it would look great. There might be similar spots in Maryland on coast with a less eclipse I haven't looked in detail. I was quite happy with the partial here in the US in 2014 and got nice h-alpha shots.

 

Yes an annular is not as good as a total, but I have done a few, I thought the 2019 annular I observed from Guam was nice. I missed the last total in Argentina and the prospects for Argentina to antarctic this year are not looking good at the moment given about everywhere is a red zone from the State Dept do not travel.  Even Australia in 2023 is maybe not looking good. 2024 in US should be fine (I hope).



#6 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 22 April 2021 - 05:42 AM

Just a reminder that you will need to focus your telescope on a star before Sunrise, since there will not be any time to focus on the Sun once the eclipse begins.  That means you should probably set up maybe about 90 minutes before Sunrise, to avoid twilight.  The focus point will change as the telescope heats up after Sunrise, but since the eclipse will be over less than an hour after Sunrise, I don't think that should be as much of an issue as it was for the November 2019 Mercury transit.

 

Don't forget to remove your nighttime finder when you put on the Solar filter before Sunrise.  It's still on backorder (from September 2020), but I ordered the day/night Orion 9X50 finderscope (with optional Solar filter), so that should make it easier to switch from night to day by adding a Solar filter onto the finderscope.  If you have a HelioPod, you can also bungee that onto your telescope at night alongside your nighttime finder.

 

If you're using AstroSolar film, check it at night with a flashlight before putting it on the telescope.

 

Try to get as much practice as you can photographing Sunrises before the eclipse.  The change in the apparent brightness of Sol in the first hour after Sunrise is rather significant and makes it very challenging to photograph.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 22 April 2021 - 06:00 AM.


#7 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 22 April 2021 - 10:43 AM

Just got home from my first COVID-19 vaccination appointment.  You shouldn't travel on June 10 unless you've been vaccinated for COVID-19.  You will likely need two separate appointments scheduled 4 to 6 weeks apart before you can be fully vaccinated.  You should also take 2 days to rest after each appointment.  So if you are planning to travel for the Solar eclipse of June 10, you need your second COVID-19 vaccination appointment by June 6, and your first appointment no later than May 6.  If you haven't done so already, make sure to contact your doctor or local health department to find out when you can schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment.

 

Is anyone livestreaming this eclipse???  That would obviously be the safest and easiest way to observe, from the comfort of home, especially for anyone who is unable to travel.  There used to be a webcam at the North Pole I think, but I doubt anyone is going up there to put a Solar filter on it.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 22 April 2021 - 10:45 AM.


#8 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 02:24 PM

I have no plans of going here, and I would need a more detailed eclipse map to be sure, but it looks like Passage Island (the northeasternmost point of Isle Royale National Park) in Michigan might be the only location in the entire USA on land (other than the Gull Islands) to experience annularity for the June 2021 Solar eclipse.  Though you might be able to rent a boat to get further into the Path of Annularity of Lake Superior, without needing to cross into Canada.

 

https://en.wikipedia...land_(Michigan)

 

https://en.wikivoyag...e_National_Park

 

Unless you're already on a boat though, I don't think there's any way to get there before Sunrise.  And might be difficult to get a decent view of Sunrise to the northeast from the lighthouse on the southwestern tip of the island.

 

The uninhabited USA Gull Islands are further north and definitely in the Path of Annularity.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 23 April 2021 - 02:49 PM.


#9 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 03:24 PM

I still can't find any webcams or livestreams.  I think Puvirnituq (Northern Quebec, Canada) might be the largest city by population within the Path of Annularity.  The NOAA webcam at the Geographic North Pole was discontinued to due a lack of funding unfortunately.

 

I found a 360-degree aurora webcam in North Pole, Alaska that shows the Sun, but that is outside of the Path of Annularity.  If there's no webcams already set up, it would require someone to actually go to one of these places at Sunrise with a Solar telescope and then livestream it, but getting internet service for video livestreaming might be difficult.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 23 April 2021 - 03:31 PM.


#10 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 03:42 PM

It looks like the Sun will be only about 8 degrees in altitude from Harrisburg at the time of fourth contact.

https://in-the-sky.o...20210610_09_100



#11 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 03:48 PM

https://www.timeandd...rg?iso=20210610



#12 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 03:52 PM

It looks like the Sun will be only about 8 degrees in altitude from Harrisburg at the time of fourth contact.

https://in-the-sky.o...20210610_09_100

Very nice!  Harrisburg is closer to the Path of Annularity than most of Maryland.  However, finding an unobstructed view will still be very difficult.

 

Right now, the best location I have found so far in the entire State of Maryland looks to be Assateague USA National Seashore Park, which also gets 8 degrees.  I confirmed directly with the USA National Park Service that Assateague will be accessible at night on the morning of June 10.  Most of Maryland (including Annapolis) is only 7 degrees in maximum altitude though.

 

For locations in the USA, finding a location with an unobstructed view to the northeast is the most important variable in selecting a site.  That means getting to a very high point (top of a mountain or tall building) or overlooking a large body of water (such as a great lake, bay, or ocean).

 

Both Sandy Point and Assateague Maryland State Parks are closed at night.

 

Best alternate site outside of Maryland I have found so far (that is less than a 6-hour drive from Cumberland) looks like around Sandusky, Ohio, but I do not know if the lakeside parks there are accessible at night.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 23 April 2021 - 04:02 PM.


#13 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 04:04 PM

However, I am very concerned about the amount of sand at Assateague.  Has anyone on Cloudy Nights ever been there?  I have never been there before.  Would it be safe to use Solar film if I set up in the parking lot?  Would I be able to see the ocean from the parking lot when facing northeast?


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 23 April 2021 - 04:05 PM.


#14 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 04:09 PM

It looks like the Sun will be only about 8 degrees in altitude from Harrisburg at the time of fourth contact.

https://in-the-sky.o...20210610_09_100

That site isn't completely accurate, since the USA actually will experience annularity in June 2021, just not over any inhabited locations—only the Gull Islands and possibly Passage Island, both in Michigan.  Chartering a boat to the Gull Islands though is cheaper than chartering a flight from Sky & Telescope.

 

I use TimeAndDate.com for pretty much all my eclipse data.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 23 April 2021 - 04:15 PM.


#15 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 04:17 PM

If a bunch of people on Cloudy Nights could split the cost of a boat charter to the Gull Islands of Michigan, that might be a good deal.  I would not recommend using a Solar telescope on a boat, but an image-stabilized telephoto lens with a glass Solar filter (not Solar film) would work.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 23 April 2021 - 04:18 PM.


#16 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 04:22 PM

If a bunch of people on Cloudy Nights could split the cost of a boat charter to the Gull Islands of Michigan, that might be a good deal.  I would not recommend using a Solar telescope on a boat, but an image-stabilized telephoto lens with a glass Solar filter (not Solar film) would work.

Never mind.  I don't think the TimeAndDate.com map is very accurate.  I checked a whole bunch of coordinates on the USA side of Lake Superior, and they all show as partial instead of annular.  So the annular eclipse will not be visible in the USA.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 23 April 2021 - 04:26 PM.


#17 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 04:41 PM

Here is some interesting information though if anyone was going to observe the Solar eclipse from a boat.  The Canada-USA border is closed right now due to the pandemic.  However, it looks like you should be able to enter Canadian waters on a boat (without needing a passport), as long as you both leave from and return to the USA, without docking in Canada.  But you should contact Canadian officials to be certain about the laws and regulations of this.

 

https://www.great-la...ing_canada.html

 

You don't need to get too far across the border within Lake Superior to see annularity.  So chartering a boat is still an option, and possibly the only option for people from the USA to see annularity in 2021 America (other than from an air flight), since Canadian land is closed to visitors.

 

Of course, you would have to travel at night, and would need good weather.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 23 April 2021 - 04:49 PM.


#18 emh52

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Posted 23 April 2021 - 08:33 PM

Here is some interesting information though if anyone was going to observe the Solar eclipse from a boat.  The Canada-USA border is closed right now due to the pandemic.  However, it looks like you should be able to enter Canadian waters on a boat (without needing a passport), as long as you both leave from and return to the USA, without docking in Canada.  But you should contact Canadian officials to be certain about the laws and regulations of this.

 

https://www.great-la...ing_canada.html

 

You don't need to get too far across the border within Lake Superior to see annularity.  So chartering a boat is still an option, and possibly the only option for people from the USA to see annularity in 2021 America (other than from an air flight), since Canadian land is closed to visitors.

 

Of course, you would have to travel at night, and would need good weather.

Given the limits unless you are a current resident in the path because Ontario is currently in no travel lockdown and who knows what it will be then, the only almost sure way to see the annular is the S&T. That should be a fun and interesting trip, but on the there hand a good partial is nice especially if you either use a h-alpha closeup or get it rising with some interesting scenery/clouds. If you google partial and annular eclipse images there are many great examples of something to strive for with your own twist of perspective. The boat is an interesting idea, but Jay Anderson weather map projections are not good for the areas accessible by boat. So it is either fly or see a partial.  This is the 2014 partial in Tucson at max.

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  • 2014 partial at max.jpg


#19 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 24 April 2021 - 07:19 AM

Given the limits unless you are a current resident in the path because Ontario is currently in no travel lockdown and who knows what it will be then, the only almost sure way to see the annular is the S&T. That should be a fun and interesting trip, but on the there hand a good partial is nice especially if you either use a h-alpha closeup or get it rising with some interesting scenery/clouds. If you google partial and annular eclipse images there are many great examples of something to strive for with your own twist of perspective. The boat is an interesting idea, but Jay Anderson weather map projections are not good for the areas accessible by boat. So it is either fly or see a partial.  This is the 2014 partial in Tucson at max.

I agree that trying to get into Canada by boat or airplane is probably not worth the expense and trouble for most people.  My top choice right now is Assateague National Seashore, and there are likely a number of other locations along the Atlantic Coast with good unobstructed views to the northeast.  If it's cloudy in Maryland, it looks like Cedar Point near Sandusky, Ohio would have a good view to the northeast overlooking Lake Erie, but not sure if any of those locations in Sandusky will be accessible at night.

 

Been reading up on the legends of lake monsters in the Great Lakes though.  Something to watch out for maybe if you have a telescope set up on the lake before Sunrise.  Whereas Assateague has dolphins and wild horses.

 

https://www.thumbwin...-lakes-monster/

 

https://en.wikipedia...e_(sea_monster)

 

With the anxiety of waiting in the dark for the eclipse to begin, maybe you convince yourself that you see a mysterious creature in the water, only to realize after Sunrise it's just a log :-o .  ;-)


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 24 April 2021 - 07:33 AM.



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