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Tron, who had it first

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#1 grif 678

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Posted 25 April 2021 - 05:39 PM

Unitron, Celestron, which scope came first? I know both are early scopes, and I wonder since both of them end in Tron, if one of them did not use part of the name of the other one, when they named their scopes. Could have been a coincidence, but that would seem unlikely.



#2 godelescher

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Posted 25 April 2021 - 05:54 PM

The modern "tron" suffix came from the word electron and was happily co-opted by advertising agencies because it sounded sciency. Who had it first? Between the two, almost certainly Unitron because of their longer pedigree (Unitron- One electron). The name means nothing, but as far as who had really first, that prize probably goes to the 1930s cyclotron, a particle accelerator.

 

Advertising agencies, with their fingers on the pulse of the nation, happily introduced a bevy of trons into modern society, the megatron, the radiotron, the rhumbatron, even the orgasmatron... the list of "trons" is seemingly endless. Neither Unitron nor Celestron broke any new ground with their names, but Unitron was groaningly late to the party before Celestron.

 

And then there's "Tron" which I saw in the theater and I played the arcade game. I still don't understand why we don't yet have light cycles. I want a light cycle!


Edited by godelescher, 25 April 2021 - 06:57 PM.

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#3 CHASLX200

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Posted 25 April 2021 - 05:56 PM

Unitron came well before Celestron.  Around 1952 for the big U and around 1964 for the big C.


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#4 godelescher

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Posted 25 April 2021 - 07:56 PM

Sleeper - Woody Allen

 

Chip W. 

God bless you for knowing that.



#5 mdowns

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Posted 25 April 2021 - 08:23 PM

Guys,this is and remains a family friendly environment. References to certain subject matter relative to adults,(humor included) but not kids should be shared via pm,not in the open forum.       Michael


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#6 starman876

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 09:46 AM

contemporary usage the term actually springs from ancient Greek, with the invention of the first vacuum tube or "kenotron" around 1904; its creator came up with the name by combining the Greek words for "empty" (keno) and "tool" (tron)


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#7 Terra Nova

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 10:33 AM

contemporary usage the term actually springs from ancient Greek, with the invention of the first vacuum tube or "kenotron" around 1904; its creator came up with the name by combining the Greek words for "empty" (keno) and "tool" (tron)

Wonderful etymological analysis Johann! I’m a bit more educated after reading it. Thank you!

waytogo.gif waytogo.gif



#8 starman876

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 11:16 AM

Wonderful etymological analysis Johann! I’m a bit more educated after reading it. Thank you!

waytogo.gif waytogo.gif

so Unitron means uni tool lol.gif


Edited by starman876, 27 April 2021 - 11:16 AM.

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#9 godelescher

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 12:53 PM

contemporary usage the term actually springs from ancient Greek, with the invention of the first vacuum tube or "kenotron" around 1904; its creator came up with the name by combining the Greek words for "empty" (keno) and "tool" (tron)

While every part of that anecdote may be true, "Contemporary usage" did not come from that. It came from the discovery and naming of the electron, more than a decade before the kenotron.

 

"Tron" as a suffix meaning technologically and/or scientifically advanced, comes from the electron, not vacuum tubes. While the kenotron may have been a marketing trendsetter by being the first business to capitalize on the sciency-sounding "tron" suffix, it shouldn't be mistaken for the origin of the suffix, just the first to use it for branding.



#10 starman876

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 01:15 PM

While every part of that anecdote may be true, "Contemporary usage" did not come from that. It came from the discovery and naming of the electron, more than a decade before the kenotron.

 

"Tron" as a suffix meaning technologically and/or scientifically advanced, comes from the electron, not vacuum tubes. While the kenotron may have been a marketing trendsetter by being the first business to capitalize on the sciency-sounding "tron" suffix, it shouldn't be mistaken for the origin of the suffix, just the first to use it for branding.

never said it came from vacuum tubes.  Tron came from the Greeks thousands of years ago.



#11 godelescher

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 03:42 PM

never said it came from vacuum tubes..

Yes, you did.

 

 

contemporary usage the term actually springs from ancient Greek, with the invention of the first vacuum tube...

Ancient Greek is not contemporary usage, and the kenotron capitalized on the notoriety of the discovery and naming of the electron, 13 years earlier.



#12 gcardona

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 05:37 PM

 

And then there's "Tron" which I saw in the theater and I played the arcade game. I still don't understand why we don't yet have light cycles. I want a light cycle!

You can have one if you ride in the Zwift virtual world!

 

tron.jpg


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#13 starman876

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 05:48 PM

Yes, you did.

 

 

Ancient Greek is not contemporary usage, and the kenotron capitalized on the notoriety of the discovery and naming of the electron, 13 years earlie

 

I said the current contemporary usage was actually derived from  ancient Greeks.  The invention of the first vacuum tube or "kenotron" around 1904; its creator came up with the name by combining the Greek words for "empty" (keno) and "tool" (tron)


Edited by mdowns, 27 April 2021 - 07:44 PM.


#14 starman876

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 05:49 PM

You can have one if you ride in the Zwift virtual world!

 

attachicon.giftron.jpg

I want onesmirk.gif



#15 Bomber Bob

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 05:50 PM

Oy Vey!  Some disparities with TRON...

 

Electron is the Ancient Greek word for amber. Amber can hold an electric charge, hence “electricity”. ... The ancient Greek word electron (ἤλεκτρον) meant “amber”.  Electron (n.) coined in 1891 by Irish physicist George J. Stoney (1826-1911) from electric + -on, as in ion (q.v.).

 

TRON as a suffix comes to English usage by way of Latin from the original Greek: -τρον (-tron), a suffix denoting an instrument, used to name the electron.

 

However, in Classical Greek, TRON denotes with a purpose.  In English, we associate an Instrument with having a specific purpose, so this suffix makes sense, too.  For ancient Romans, a transliteration of the Greek TRON to TRONUS was associated with power more than purpose.  A pa-tron(us) has the power (wealth, resources) to support another person(s).


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#16 Terra Nova

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 06:03 PM

Check out this cool magnetron demonstration: 

 

https://youtu.be/URJxfXMv9OU


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#17 ccwemyss

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 06:59 PM

Oy Vey!  Some disparities with TRON...

 

Electron is the Ancient Greek word for amber. Amber can hold an electric charge, hence “electricity”. ... The ancient Greek word electron (ἤλεκτρον) meant “amber”.  Electron (n.) coined in 1891 by Irish physicist George J. Stoney (1826-1911) from electric + -on, as in ion (q.v.).

 

TRON as a suffix comes to English usage by way of Latin from the original Greek: -τρον (-tron), a suffix denoting an instrument, used to name the electron.

 

However, in Classical Greek, TRON denotes with a purpose.  In English, we associate an Instrument with having a specific purpose, so this suffix makes sense, too.  For ancient Romans, a transliteration of the Greek TRON to TRONUS was associated with power more than purpose.  A pa-tron(us) has the power (wealth, resources) to support another person(s).

One of my grad students wrote a lovely, long poem, called Freedom Becomes Electra, for one of my classes, that begins,

 

Once my life was fun and free

No slave to power-hungry humanity

That was before that ancient Greek

With cat skin woke me from my amber sleep

 

It's even more remarkable because her first language was Chinese. 

 

Electra is, of course, one of the Pleiades (Amber, or Shining One). Which brings it back around to its connection with telescope naming. 

 

Chip W. 


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#18 starman876

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Posted 27 April 2021 - 07:16 PM

Everything you wanted to know about Tron but were afraid to ask


Edited by starman876, 27 April 2021 - 07:19 PM.

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#19 Kasmos

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 04:47 AM

Yes Unitron used it first, but where did Celes-tron come from?

Tom Johnson was in the the Electronics business and debuts his new business venture with a scope called the Celestronic 20.

Celestronic 20.jpg

My guess, the name was influenced by Fecker's 'Celestar' scopes. Which by the way, were blue and white!


Edited by Kasmos, 28 April 2021 - 04:47 AM.

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#20 CHASLX200

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 05:46 AM

Yes Unitron used it first, but where did Celes-tron come from?

Tom Johnson was in the the Electronics business and debuts his new business venture with a scope called the Celestronic 20.

attachicon.gifCelestronic 20.jpg

My guess, the name was influenced by Fecker's 'Celestar' scopes. Which by the way, were blue and white!

I'm not lifting that 20" SCT. I wonder if one is still around somewhere?



#21 Terra Nova

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 11:22 AM

Yes Unitron used it first, but where did Celes-tron come from?

Tom Johnson was in the the Electronics business and debuts his new business venture with a scope called the Celestronic 20.

attachicon.gifCelestronic 20.jpg

My guess, the name was influenced by Fecker's 'Celestar' scopes. Which by the way, were blue and white!

I think you hit the nail squarely on its head Chris! waytogo.gif


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#22 Kasmos

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 01:19 PM

I'm not lifting that 20" SCT. 

lol.gif.... Who would?



#23 starman876

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 02:41 PM

 lol.gif.... Who would?

Nobody I know could lift that scope.  foreheadslap.gif


Edited by starman876, 28 April 2021 - 02:42 PM.


#24 ccwemyss

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 04:18 PM

Nobody I know could lift that scope.  foreheadslap.gif

I wouldn't put it past Neil. He's moved some pretty big scopes.  

 

Chip W. 



#25 starman876

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Posted 28 April 2021 - 07:23 PM

I wouldn't put it past Neil. He's moved some pretty big scopes.  

 

Chip W. 

Well yes, with equipment.  I think we are talking about some brute lifting the OTA by themselves.




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