Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Towa 60/900 restoration thread

  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 29 April 2021 - 12:32 PM

Recently, there may have been a misconception that my favorite pastime is breaking lenses and mirrors. I would like to deny these false rumors by presenting an example of the activities I devote to when I am not breaking glass. I spotted the Towa 60/900 telescope on an advertising portal in Germany. It cost little, because the owner was not sure if the equipment was operational and could not check it. I was also unable to judge it from the photos. They testified to the poor condition of the instrument. However, I decided to take a risk, despite the fact that it is a brand that does not enjoy the recognition of connoisseurs too much. So why Towa?

 

First of all, I remembered a very good Towa 60/700 refractor with exceptionally good optics, which I saved some time ago. Secondly, this model seems to me to be one of the most classic "classics",  thanks to the characteristic, switchable finder integrated with the main lens. For me, this patent is a symbol of the 1970s and 1980s, and for a long time I had a feeling that it is appropriate to have at least one example of this unique solution in the collection. And here was the opportunity and the seller, that was determined enough to agree to put the effort into packing the equipment and shipping it to Poland.

 

I'm not even sure what the model is, there were probably few similar Towa telescopes on the same mount, with the same finder, differing in small details - incl. focal length (900, 910).  However, I have the impression that at one time it was a kind of "flagship" of this manufacturer, which called at the ports of many retail chains, such as Sears, Neckermann, Quelle, etc. This time the ship marked as "Olympia" went to some place unknown to me - perhaps it was some sort of French trading network judging from the name?

 

After the prolonged adventures with transport caused by DPD, a huge box filled with a large number of carefully cut cardboard scraps to protect historic Japanese optics, has finally reached me...

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210429_164143.jpg
  • 20210429_164050.jpg

Edited by LukaszLu, 29 April 2021 - 03:19 PM.

  • Pete W, clamchip, Marc-Andre and 4 others like this

#2 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 29 April 2021 - 12:47 PM

Well - the first inspection confirmed what was visible in some photos. The condition of the equipment was discouraging, I was even a bit ashamed to take it out of the box.

 

The lens area looked the worst. The lenses themselves looked undamaged, but the dewshield was badly bent and then badly lacerated when trying to straighten it with pliers.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210327_124323.jpg
  • 20210326_155200.jpg
  • 20210326_155325.jpg
  • 20210330_132754.jpg

Edited by LukaszLu, 29 April 2021 - 12:55 PM.

  • clamchip, Piggyback and Kasmos like this

#3 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 29 April 2021 - 12:55 PM

The cell was hit so hard that it bent along with the tube fragment. Removing it in such a way as not to destroy the thread completely was quite a challenge. Initial straightening of the dewshield was carried out using the method that I previously shared on the forum here: https://www.cloudyni...nted-dewshield/. For straightening the tube and the cell, I made a special wooden hoof and a mold, which, when pressed with a carpentry clamp, should help straighten the arched surfaces. It worked quite well for the aluminum tube. Unfortunately, the hard, brittle cast from which the cell is made could not withstand the pressure and broke. There was a large hole in the side threaded surface, which was filled in with the strong epoxy used by conservators to glue the stone together. I recreated a fragment of the thread using a mold made of ordinary plasticine.

 

20210406_200634.jpg

20210406_222023(0).jpg

20210407_162353.jpg

20210407_173552.jpg

20210408_135717(0).jpg


Edited by LukaszLu, 29 April 2021 - 01:52 PM.

  • Pete W, clamchip, icomet and 3 others like this

#4 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 29 April 2021 - 01:51 PM

Usually, I avoid not only re-varnishing, but even filling minor paint losses on the tube. For this reason, I have no proven method of dealing with such damage. Here, however, there were so many of them that I decided to experiment.

 

20210410_125129.jpg

 

I made a kind of paste using artistic white oil paint, to which I added some crushed chalk and some drying agents to speed up the drying. I used this substance to fill the missing varnish and larger scratches, and when it started to dry a bit, I began to gently polish these places with toilet paper, removing the excess. After a few days, when it felt quite hard, I polished the whole thing with polishing paste for car bodies.

 

20210410_142257.jpg

 

I was convinced that the experiment would fail, but surprisingly my "coloring putty" turned out to be quite effective. In the places where it has stayed, I don't have to do anything else. There are a few places where the "putty" crumbled during polishing with paper, as well as the place where the tube was dented, in which I applied a thicker layer that requires sanding with sandpaper. This spot has less gloss and a slightly darker color so it will still need a white acrylic spray.

 

I used the same "putty" to level the surface of the dewshield, the cell and the heavily battered "lampshade" of a small lamp attached to the accessory tray. I was wondering if automotive acrylic spray paint would stick to such an oil primer, but after sanding it with 800 grit sandpaper and degreasing the acrylic lacquer seems to stick without problems.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210410_132816.jpg
  • 20210428_183433(1).jpg
  • 20210428_205045(1).jpg
  • 20210428_205136.jpg
  • 20210428_205503.jpg

Edited by LukaszLu, 29 April 2021 - 02:10 PM.

  • Pete W, clamchip, icomet and 4 others like this

#5 Kasmos

Kasmos

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,751
  • Joined: 19 Aug 2015
  • Loc: So Cal

Posted 29 April 2021 - 02:09 PM

Nice work! Interesting solutions to those issues. Since it looks like new, I assume the first couple of photos at the top of the thread were taken after the the restoration.


  • LukaszLu likes this

#6 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 29 April 2021 - 02:09 PM

Elements painted with black lacquer were also in poor condition, and many of them showed structures resembling a fungus attacking usually optics. Fungus in varnish? Is it possible? This also applies to the main "hit" of this model - the finder, which has been dismantled and thoroughly cleaned in and outside, including the optics.

 

I cleaned what could be cleaned, and the worst cases, such as the accessory tray, were sanded and painted again with acrylic semi gloss spray.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210327_131509.jpg
  • 20210327_124200.jpg
  • 20210405_180203.jpg
  • 20210405_180550(0).jpg

Edited by LukaszLu, 29 April 2021 - 03:41 PM.


#7 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 29 April 2021 - 02:18 PM

Nice work! Interesting solutions to those issues. Since it looks like new, I assume the first couple of photos at the top of the thread were taken after the the restoration.

Thanks - exactly, I've made them today. In fact it is never my goal to achieve the look "like new". Of course, each art conservator has his own philosophy and methodology, some prefer a more conservative approach, preserving the historical appearance of monuments, others would like to see the renovated objects "as new". I try to use a "time capsule" criterion: object should look as if it has moved in time, arriving from times when it was normally used. So normal signs of use are OK for me and I do not fight with small scratches on the tube or paint chips on the mount. But for example, rust, fungus, severe damage - things that would be unacceptable even while this equipment was in use - are all I try to repair.


Edited by LukaszLu, 29 April 2021 - 02:39 PM.

  • GreyDay and cookjaiii like this

#8 Kasmos

Kasmos

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,751
  • Joined: 19 Aug 2015
  • Loc: So Cal

Posted 29 April 2021 - 02:24 PM

Thanks - exactly, I've made them today. In fact it is never my goal to achieve the look "like new". Of course, each art conservator has his own philosophy and methodology, some prefer a more conservative approach, preserving the historical appearance of monuments, others would like to see the renovated objects "as new". I try to use a "time capsule" criterion: object should look as if it has moved in time, arriving from times when it was normally used. So normal signs of use are OK for me and I do not fight with small scratches on the tube or paint padding on the mount. But for example, rust, fungus, severe damage - things that would be unacceptable even while this equipment was in use - are all I try to repair.

I have a somewhat similar take on fixing them up. I clean, polish, and touch them up. They don't have to come out looking perfect, but instead, make an abused scope look like a well cared for example.


  • clamchip, Piggyback, walter a and 1 other like this

#9 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 29 April 2021 - 03:41 PM

They don't have to come out looking perfect, but instead, make an abused scope look like a well cared for example.

"Well cared" is the key word in my opinion. The equipment should not look run-down, found in a damp and dirty basement. And in most cases, such a criterion is sufficient to obtain a quite satisfactory renovation effect. Especially if you put a little work into displaying the visual qualities of a wooden tripod. I noticed that the unveiling of the original, often very decorative structure of the wood can effectively divert attention from the small lacquering flaws of the tube or mount, significantly increasing the aesthetics of the whole.

 

This usually requires the removal of the original varnish layers from the tripod. In the case of old Japanese tripods, these are quite specific methods of painting, which in most cases aim to hide the original texture of the wood to a greater or lesser extent. Why?

 

Here is a small digression. In my opinion, wooden tripods are the weakest element of the old Japanese astro-optics. They are often made carelessly, of poor quality wood, which is sometimes unseasoned, undergoes warping, and above all is not specially selected. As a result, the individual elements of the tripod can differ quite significantly in texture, color, brightness, etc. It is amazing considering the Western ideas about Japanese culture, which we associate with exceptional sensitivity to the beauty of nature, including wood, which is such an important element of Japanese architecture and applied arts.

 

Meanwhile, the Japanese made terrible wooden tripods, and the rescue was probably a specific painting of wood. Sometimes it consisted of covering it with a layer of translucent white primer, on which glaze coloring layers were applied (found, for example, in Towa tripods from the 1950s). It was worse when Japanese producers went all the way and used terrible  brown oil paint, giving wooden elements the status of a bench at a train station ...

 

This was also the case here ... Scary, brutally shiny brown. The last time I saw it, on the occasion of the Kenko TA-910 refractor renovation, I stripped off all the paint and covered the wood with coloring oils that gave a similar dark brown effect, but without obscuring the texture of the wood. It must be said, however, that removing this brown paint, squeezing into the deepest and tiniest gaps in the wood, is a Sisyphean job, which is probably as hard as removing the aforementioned white primer...

 

20210326_155355.jpg

 

That's why when my wife looked at the tripod and asked me to come to my senses this time and gave up on removing the paint because the tripod is in pretty good condition - after a moment's hesitation I agreed with her. In fact - if you were to retouch the flaws of brown paint, and then unify and reduce the gloss, perhaps the tripod would take on a completely different character...?

 

I retouched tripod legs with brown acrylic paint, sanded the markers stained with yellow paint, restoring them to the natural color of the wood, and finally painted it all with several layers of satin polyurethane varnish for parquet. And guess what? It looks great! A slight change in gloss and revealing the color of the wood on small cuts on the surface was enough to give the tripod a completely different class and a much nobler character!

 

to be continued... :-)

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210403_180416.jpg
  • 20210403_184409.jpg

Edited by LukaszLu, 29 April 2021 - 04:28 PM.

  • photiost, Piggyback and Kasmos like this

#10 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 30 April 2021 - 05:08 PM

The unexpected success achieved at a low cost in the renovation of wooden elements encouraged me to face the mount, which required disassembling parts, thorough cleaning, rust removal of some elements and putting on a new grease. The high-quality silicone grease made the mount work smooth, quiet and reliable.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210330_163418.jpg
  • 20210330_184220(0).jpg
  • 20210330_215648.jpg
  • 20210331_001936.jpg

  • icomet and Piggyback like this

#11 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 30 April 2021 - 05:20 PM

Before assembling the tripod, I had to do some small bodywork and painting works: straightening the metal fittings and elements holding the accessory tray, as well as replenishing the missing varnish. Similar paint retouching was necessary on the mount elements.

 

The characteristic structural varnish used in Towa telescopes since the 1950s proved to be very helpful. Restoration of paint damage can be done very simply, using appropriately dense, black acrylic paint and a small, stiff brush with hard bristles, which allows you to obtain a similar, irregular texture. After these treatments, the structural varnish looks like new - acrylic paint applied with small touches of a brush not only has a similar structure, but also a similar gloss. The smooth-varnished accessory tray was so damaged that it had to be re-lacquered with acrylic, black semi gloss spray.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210331_220148(0).jpg
  • 20210401_012314(1).jpg

Edited by LukaszLu, 30 April 2021 - 05:24 PM.

  • Piggyback likes this

#12 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 30 April 2021 - 05:57 PM

And finally accessories - a finder, eyepieces, diagonal, erecting prism, Barlow lens, filters... Everything was disassembled, thoroughly cleaned and disinfected, because I found traces of fungal infection on several lenses. I also cleaned the main lens thoroughly, which was originally installed upside down - with a Flint facing outside.

Here is a small of advice for all those who will try to clean the eyepieces included in this quite popular in the old days, "colorful" set. Encouraged by the test of durability of the print on the sticker on the black SR4mm eyepiece, which withstood the effect of isopropanol well, I unfortunately destroyed the sticker on another gray HM9mm eyepiece. It turned out that this time the isopropanol dissolved the print, which disappeared after the first swab.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210405_205808.jpg
  • 20210405_205827.jpg
  • 20210327_235613(0).jpg
  • 20210405_191940.jpg
  • 20210501_003430.jpg

Edited by LukaszLu, 30 April 2021 - 05:59 PM.

  • Piggyback likes this

#13 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 30 April 2021 - 06:28 PM

When the last spray-painted elements dried up, the most awaited moment has come - putting the whole thing together. I must say that the visual effect surprised me - I couldn't imagine that dirty, bent and battered equipment that I took out of the box could look like this. The telescope has regained its glow - it looks elegant and ... I am looking for the right word ... - dignified! Yes - that's probably the right word. You can see that it is an adult, serious competitor...

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210429_163811.jpg
  • 20210429_163839(0).jpg
  • 20210429_163901(0).jpg
  • 20210429_163921.jpg
  • 20210429_163931.jpg

  • astro140, Pete W, Kokatha man and 4 others like this

#14 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 30 April 2021 - 06:32 PM

I presented the effect to my wife. First reaction: "70's" ... And indeed it is - brown paint leaves no doubt. But the point was to make the equipment from the 70s look like equipment from the 70s at first glance! Founding wife's reaction a success was easy, especially since looking at this telescope gives me a real joy - just like working with it.

 

I do not know if it will become my standard observation instrument. Observation tests are still ahead of me, maybe I will have some experiments with the mutual alignment of the lens elements. The construction of the cell facilitating the removal of lenses raises concerns that the lens has been dismantled many times, and the lens orientation I found is not necessarily original and optimal. The first attempts look promising, but regardless of their result, I do not imagine that I would part with this strange, but charming refractor.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210429_163948.jpg
  • 20210429_164001.jpg
  • 20210429_164030.jpg
  • 20210429_164218(0).jpg
  • 20210429_164405(0).jpg

  • Pete W, Kokatha man, Terra Nova and 3 others like this

#15 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 30 April 2021 - 06:40 PM

Oh - I would forget about the most important thing... And yet this little lamp is the main reason why this telescope was worth all this effort. Isn't it charming? :-)

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20210501_013412.jpg

  • Pete W, Kokatha man, icomet and 3 others like this

#16 Senex Bibax

Senex Bibax

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 743
  • Joined: 01 Feb 2019
  • Loc: Ottawa, ON

Posted 01 May 2021 - 06:31 AM

Nice work! You are quite right about similar scopes being made by Towa for different retailers and sold under many names. The integrated flip-up finder is found on some Tascos, and I used to own a Sears 6333A (also Towa 60x900) that had an almost identical light for the eyepiece tray. I never got the light working properly despite the simple wiring, there was some hidden corrosion or a short that caused it to drain batteries in almost no time. The scope gave excellent, sharp images for its size.


  • LukaszLu likes this

#17 GreyDay

GreyDay

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 508
  • Joined: 28 Nov 2013
  • Loc: Southport UK

Posted 01 May 2021 - 07:29 AM

Great restoration Lukasz waytogo.gif

 

If the objective cell breaks again it should be pretty easy to replace, nearly all the Tasco or other branded Towa, Kenko 60mm's use the same cell and tube diameter.


  • LukaszLu likes this

#18 Piggyback

Piggyback

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,245
  • Joined: 14 Sep 2013
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 01 May 2021 - 08:41 AM

Wow, I'm in awe looking at your thorough restoration work. Your latest project is testament to that. Seems to me like you enjoy tackling thoroughly neglected scopes that otherwise may have ended in the dumpster. waytogo.gif

 

And yes, your tray light is a charm. I recently found an equatorialy mounted Apollo 60/910mm achromat with a working lamp from the late 1960's. They rarely show up in the german marketplace.


  • LukaszLu likes this

#19 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 01 May 2021 - 10:05 AM

Nice work! You are quite right about similar scopes being made by Towa for different retailers and sold under many names. The integrated flip-up finder is found on some Tascos, and I used to own a Sears 6333A (also Towa 60x900) that had an almost identical light for the eyepiece tray. I never got the light working properly despite the simple wiring, there was some hidden corrosion or a short that caused it to drain batteries in almost no time. The scope gave excellent, sharp images for its size.

Perhaps someone can help identify this model. It seems to me that it may be Towa 6305 or Towa ET2, but unfortunately these manufacturer's markings do not coincide in any way with the trade markings.

 

My first observation tests show that the lens can give a very precise, extra-sharp image, but you have to wait for it sometimes because for some reason the air movement and the associated blurring of the image are very visible. Perhaps this is evidence of high-quality optics?

 

The lens gives a bit of chromatic aberration at the edges of the field of view, and the image, compared to some other refractors, is probably slightly worse in terms of contrast. Perhaps it is not a matter of the lens, but of the focuser construction. Very long drwatube, typical of early 1950s designs, has a surprisingly small diameter. Perhaps it is conducive to the formation of some flares that reduce the contrast?

 

 

Great restoration Lukasz waytogo.gif

 

If the objective cell breaks again it should be pretty easy to replace, nearly all the Tasco or other branded Towa, Kenko 60mm's use the same cell and tube diameter.

Thanks! The epoxy resin I used seems very resistant, even though it has no fiber or aluminum fillers. It is a product used by sculpture restorers to glue stone together, so I guess it must be strong. Just in case, however, I decided to avoid using this refractor for driving nails :-)

 

 

Wow, I'm in awe looking at your thorough restoration work. Your latest project is testament to that. Seems to me like you enjoy tackling thoroughly neglected scopes that otherwise may have ended in the dumpster. waytogo.gif

 

And yes, your tray light is a charm. I recently found an equatorialy mounted Apollo 60/910mm achromat with a working lamp from the late 1960's. They rarely show up in the german marketplace.

 

Thank you! You are right - I think that I have discovered a passion for old equipment as strong as my love for astronomy, and I am particularly happy to restore equipment that belongs to endangered and disappearing species :-)

 

Unfortunately, this also requires a partner on the other side - that is, the goodwill of the seller. Such equipment is usually cheap - I paid € 30 for it + another € 30 for transport. Spending time and work packing and shipping to make € 30 is not a good deal. It takes more than a willingness to make a profit to agree to ship such equipment at this price level. The lady who sold me this telescope has put a tremendous amount of work into its packaging. Then for a week she fought the DPD courier who did not show up to collect the parcel, and finally her husband had to personally haul a large box to the post office, otherwise there was no chance for the parcel to leave Germany.

 

I have to thank these nice people very much here - they have contributed to the rescue of this beautiful telescope!

 

As for the lamps, it seems to me that most of the 60/900 and 60/910 models available in Germany were originally equipped with them. However, for some reason they are disappearing from the aftermarket kits. Perhaps the Germans are more lovers of small lamps than telescopes? :-)


Edited by LukaszLu, 01 May 2021 - 10:13 AM.

  • Piggyback and GreyDay like this

#20 GreyDay

GreyDay

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 508
  • Joined: 28 Nov 2013
  • Loc: Southport UK

Posted 01 May 2021 - 01:49 PM

As for the lamps, it seems to me that most of the 60/900 and 60/910 models available in Germany were originally equipped with them. However, for some reason they are disappearing from the aftermarket kits. Perhaps the Germans are more lovers of small lamps than telescopes? :-)

I've had a few tray lamps over the years, the three main culprits for them disappearing are: people throwing them in the bin because the batteries corrode and eat through the battery box, being used to light up telescope cases or people using them on larger scope trays then selling the 60mm without the light. The white plastic shade often becomes brittle my first just fell apart when i was cleaning it! so i bought more whenever they came up on ebay. i have just one now that needs cleaning and repainting due to corrosion. It came with my Prinz500 (Towa 60x900) which i kept for it's pretty two tone blue/green paintwork. smile.gif

Typical battery corrosion on my Prinz500 tray
 
prinz500 3

Edited by GreyDay, 01 May 2021 - 01:55 PM.


#21 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 01 May 2021 - 02:42 PM

You are probably right! Funny - this inconspicuous lamp seems to raise the status of the telescope to such an extent that many people probably try to install it in their "flagship"... :-)

 

In my copy there were also batteries probably from the 70's, which had time to spill out and crystallize into a form impossible to hammer even with a screwdriver. Fortunately, inside was the original plastic battery sleeve, which I destroyed trying to remove any remnants from inside, but which kept the metal battery holder from acid.

 

Fortunately, my lampshade was made of metal, I sanded it with paper without any problems and painted it with glossy acrylic varnish in aerosol, it looks like new. I think that you will easily bring your black lacquered elements to a state of splendor - I recommend Motip semi gloss black acrylic lacquer - it applies easy and evenly, the effect is really professional.



#22 Terra Nova

Terra Nova

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 24,799
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: 39.07°N, 229m AMSL, USA

Posted 02 May 2021 - 01:22 PM

Wonderful restoration! waytogo.gif waytogo.gif



#23 mpsteidle

mpsteidle

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 270
  • Joined: 26 May 2015
  • Loc: Northern KY

Posted 02 May 2021 - 01:40 PM

Looks brand new!  No broken objectives or anything!  Give us an observing report when you get it under the stars, hopefully it performs as good as it looks.



#24 LukaszLu

LukaszLu

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 525
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2020
  • Loc: Poland

Posted 02 May 2021 - 04:53 PM

Friends, thank you very much for all your encouraging comments. Renovation of old equipment is a great and satisfying entertainment, but it has one downside: if you put into something a few weeks of work, then it is difficult to treat such a telescope as an ordinary utility item that you can part with without regret, sell, etc. Meanwhile, I have already surpassed the magic number 10 pieces that I have to put in my home - and I start to panic that this is the end of expanding my collection. It has been biting me for some time.

 

The weather is to blame for everything, or rather the lack of it. Compared to last year, there were hardly any conditions for observation over the past few months. And these are the consequences ... :-)



#25 photiost

photiost

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,099
  • Joined: 14 Dec 2006
  • Loc: Montreal, Canada

Posted 02 May 2021 - 06:56 PM

Wonderful restoration job !!

 

When I was 12 years old my very first telescope was a Towa 60mm 900mm ...

 

It is the telescope that started me on this journey,  I still have that telescope.  

.

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Towa 60mm 900mm f15.jpg

  • Piggyback and LukaszLu like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics