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EPs for begginer? X-Cel LX?

Beginner Eyepieces
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#1 Boven

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 03:59 AM

I have a 6'' newtonian with stock 6mm and 25mm Plossls. The 6mm is literally unusable but the 25mm is fine.

I'm thinking of buying a Celestron X-Cel LX eyepieces, specifically 26mm and 12 or 9mm and probably a barlow 3x.

Are these going to be enough for me. I'll observe basically anything. Mostly planetary nebulae, clusters and galaxies. (the moon and planets too, of ourse!)

 

Also, I've saw on Stellarium that many planetary nebulae are very small, so can I observe them with a 12mm and a barlow? Do they suffer a lot from high magnification?


Edited by Boven, 03 May 2021 - 04:02 AM.


#2 GreyDay

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 05:54 AM

A lot of what you're asking will depend on the focal length of your telescope, is it f5 (750mm) f8 (1200mm)?. Will your scope take 2" ep's? knowing this will help.

 

The LX's are good eyepieces but at 60 degree AFOV you're not really improving your field of view much over regular 50 degree plossls.

 

For extended objects like galaxies a wider field may be needed, some clusters may also require a wider field at higher magnification. With high magnification your field of view will narrow and dim considerably.

 

Of the three targets you've mentioned i only observe clusters so i'll leave it to others to suggest EP's for nebulae and galaxies. For clusters at high mags i like ES 82 degree ep's and they cost only a little more than the LX's. Also worth a mention are the BST starguiders which are half the price of the LX's with the same AFOV, a good starter eyepiece.


Edited by GreyDay, 03 May 2021 - 05:56 AM.


#3 Boven

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 06:06 AM

A lot of what you're asking will depend on the focal length of your telescope, is it f5 (750mm) f8 (1200mm)?. Will your scope take 2" ep's? knowing this will help.

 

The LX's are good eyepieces but at 60 degree AFOV you're not really improving your field of view much over regular 50 degree plossls.

 

For extended objects like galaxies a wider field may be needed, some clusters may also require a wider field at higher magnification. With high magnification your field of view will narrow and dim considerably.

 

Of the three targets you've mentioned i only observe clusters so i'll leave it to others to suggest EP's for nebulae and galaxies. For clusters at high mags i like ES 82 degree ep's and they cost only a little more than the LX's. Also worth a mention are the BST starguiders which are half the price of the LX's with the same AFOV, a good starter eyepiece.

Sorry I didn't mention it but I have an f/5 (so 750mm) and my scope can only take 1.25'' ep.



#4 cookjaiii

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 06:45 AM

The Celestrons you propose are very nice mid-level eyepieces and will get you a noticeably wider field of view with good eye relief.  I think pairing those with a 3x Barlow is not as useful as a 2x Barlow would be.  

 

Do you know the maximum useful magnification in your viewing area?  The turbulence of the atmosphere may prevent you from enjoying the views at the highest magnification your telescope is capable of.  In my area, I can rarely use any eyepiece above 170x.  More often, 150x is the maximum.  A 5mm eyepiece (or Barlowed equivalent) will probably be your most-used high magnification eyepiece.  

 

If you are just starting out, a zoom eyepiece plus a 2x Barlow might be a good choice.  It will give you access to the entire useful range of magnifications for your telescope, so you can decide what you like best before spending a lot of money on individual eyepieces.  

 

If I were starting out with the money you are proposing to spend, I would get the 26mm LX X-cell, an 8-24 zoom, and a 2x Barlow. Then starting saving up for some 82-degree eyepieces.

 

Good luck with your decisions.  



#5 Virtus

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 07:13 AM

Nothing wrong with XCel LX per se but I would go with Paradigms/Starguiders instead. Similar performance for about 2/3 cost. 



#6 DavidSt

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 07:26 AM

Many users tend to mix Paradigm’s with the Celestron X-cel LX’s (same as Meade HD60’s). The strong Paradigm’s et. al. seem to be the 5mm and 12mm. I would avoid the 25mm. The strong X-cels seem to be the 7mm(6.5mm), 9mm, and 25mm. The 18mm on both are just ok. From what I’ve seen, if you need better eye relief, use eyeglasses, or want to share your scope wirh eyeglass wearers, lean toward the X-cel’s. I like the form factor of the Paradigm’s better but the eyecups are more deeply recessed than the Xcel’s. Subtracting that distance from the stated eye relief results in less useable eye relief for those that wear specs. Some wearers can still use the Paradigms but many cannot. If this is the case, the Paradigm 5mm and 12mm advantage swings to the X-cels. A few eyeglass wearers still can’t use the Xcels either but most seem to do fine. If you are willing to dismantle an eyepiece and tighten up the lens cage, the Planetary II eyepieces below 7mm are an even better choice for less than $35 each. At these prices with decent eye relief there is little need for a barlow. If you would like a very nice zoom in the same price range, get the Svbony 7-21mm.

A very good starter set would be a 25mm Xcel, Svbony 7-21mm zoom, and a 5mm Planetary II, Xcel, or Paradigm. You can then take your time filling in the middle with the 7mm, 9mm, 12mm, and 18mm Xcel’s or Paradigms.

Edited by DavidSt, 03 May 2021 - 08:04 AM.


#7 SeattleScott

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 08:49 AM

Nothing wrong with XCel LX per se but I would go with Paradigms/Starguiders instead. Similar performance for about 2/3 cost.

Not at 25mm. For the 12, fine.

#8 LDW47

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 09:09 AM

I have a 6'' newtonian with stock 6mm and 25mm Plossls. The 6mm is literally unusable but the 25mm is fine.

I'm thinking of buying a Celestron X-Cel LX eyepieces, specifically 26mm and 12 or 9mm and probably a barlow 3x.

Are these going to be enough for me. I'll observe basically anything. Mostly planetary nebulae, clusters and galaxies. (the moon and planets too, of ourse!)

 

Also, I've saw on Stellarium that many planetary nebulae are very small, so can I observe them with a 12mm and a barlow? Do they suffer a lot from high magnification?

Get them, I enjoyed my 4 and 2x barlow, they are as good as the next for the price !


Edited by LDW47, 03 May 2021 - 12:51 PM.


#9 JamesDuffey

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 09:27 AM

The 25mm Plössl is a good serviceable eyepiece. I would not replace it at this point. One rule of thumb for acquiring eyepieces is not to duplicate focal lengths of acceptable eyepieces until you have a full range of focal lengths. 

 

I suggest getting a 2X Barlow and either the 9mm X-Cel LX, an 8mm Paradigm/Starguider ED, or an 8mm-9mm BST Planetary.  This will give you a nice range of effective focal lengths and magnifications, and more importantly, give you a good introduction into all kinds of observing. The costs is not great, less than $100. You might add a 32mm Plössl for a wide FOV low magnification views. That will be another $30.

 

Let us know what you decide.




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