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Test session : M92 the lesser globular ...

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#1 F.Meiresonne

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 01:51 PM

Hi folks

 

Test session in my 130 mm TS Photoline f/7...

Only  a test still i find it not bad at all considering this picture holds no flats nor bias...

 

https://www.cloudyni...3911_430041.png

 

Just wanted to know if any caveats were in the scope. It seems all good, or good enough. 

 

Roughly 2 hours of integration

 

This globular too is impressive ....

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  • M92_11.jpg

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#2 Boeglewatcher

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 02:18 PM

Great shot, Freddy. The globular looks 3-dimensional. Very impressive!

cs Joachim 



#3 MikiSJ

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 03:17 PM

:waytogo: Nice capture! 



#4 spaceoddity

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 03:24 PM

M92 is a beauty!



#5 AviddayM

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Posted 03 May 2021 - 06:38 PM

Very nice image. waytogo.gif



#6 F.Meiresonne

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 01:02 PM

Thanks everybody for the comments

 

For those who like it , a cropped version

 

only a jpg but what the heck.

 

Stefan, a deepsky friend, told me about quite some faint (alot) small galaxies in the picture, some over 500 milion lightyears away..i should pay more attention...

 

http://www.jthommes....p_annotated.jpg

 

But this was only a test shoot, i did not expect it would be that great, allthough, picture still could be better...

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  • M92_11_cropped.jpg

Edited by F.Meiresonne, 04 May 2021 - 01:03 PM.

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#7 F.Meiresonne

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 01:18 PM

Actually, if this info is correct, even a quasar bilions of lightyears away is in this picture...

 

Just crazy...

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  • M92_Quasar.JPG
  • Quasar2.JPG

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#8 vidrazor

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 01:23 PM

Nice! Is that without a flat field corrector with your Canon?



#9 F.Meiresonne

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 01:25 PM

No , a field flattener was used, yes with the Canon  800D (T7i), unmodded of the shelf camera...

Without FF stars would be a little egg shaped in the corners, 

 

See picture

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  • IMG_1723 (Large).JPG

Edited by F.Meiresonne, 04 May 2021 - 01:29 PM.


#10 Boeglewatcher

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 02:28 PM

Actually, if this info is correct, even a quasar bilions of lightyears away is in this picture...

 

Just crazy...

Amazing! How did you identify the Quasar, Freddy?

very nice scope you have there!

cs Joachim 


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#11 F.Meiresonne

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 02:36 PM

Amazing! How did you identify the Quasar, Freddy?

very nice scope you have there!

cs Joachim 

I did not.

 

My deepsky friend Stefan van de Rostyne did it...

 

I am still loosing myself too much in the technical aspect of taking and processing the image...i used to be a visual observer...Always on the edge of trying to see the faintest stuff...at the time, off course no quasars...i should just learn to pay more attention what is in the picture...

 

But indeed quite amazing this is possible from a light polluted backyard..bortle 5

,


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#12 unimatrix0

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 03:36 PM

My brother is a star-cluster fanatic (fan of looking at star clusters more than galaxies or nebulae) he always asking me to photograph the star clusters. I guess he read or watched something about how an advanced alien civilization would aim to live in a star cluster instead of lonely solar systems, due to abundance of resources from stars being near. Doubtful there would be day or night though on a planet (if that's even possible) circling around a star deep in the cluster. 


Edited by unimatrix0, 04 May 2021 - 03:37 PM.


#13 vidrazor

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 05:15 PM

No , a field flattener was used, yes with the Canon  800D (T7i), unmodded of the shelf camera...

Without FF stars would be a little egg shaped in the corners, 

See picture

Nice. If a triplett still need a corrector, what's the advantage in the triplett? I thought the third optic was doing some correction.
 


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#14 Kevin_A

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 05:46 PM

Nice. If a triplett still need a corrector, what's the advantage in the triplett? I thought the third optic was doing some correction.
 

A field flattener corrects the shape at the edges of the image whereas a triplet corrects all 3 colours... red, green and blue to make them all converge at the same point. Telescopes are typically designed for the round contour of our eyeballs and therefore must be corrected for a flat camera sensor to remove elongation from this mismatch.... and that is the purpose of a flattener.


Edited by Kevin_A, 04 May 2021 - 05:52 PM.

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#15 F.Meiresonne

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Posted 05 May 2021 - 12:36 AM

Nice. If a triplett still need a corrector, what's the advantage in the triplett? I thought the third optic was doing some correction.
 

CA correction as Kevin mentioned. A doublet can't correct for full CA, and this CA increases with the aperture..It crossed my mind to buy a 125 mm FPL53 doublet because those kind of doublets are really well corrected allready like my 102 mm but due to the increased aperture i thought i was more 'secure' to go for a triplet.

 

There are even lens designs with 4 or more lenses for correcting CA. Televue uses a Petzval element. 2 cemented doublets , that is 4 lenses in 2 groups. I believe the redcats use Petzval too.

 

Nevertheless one needs a FF ,otherwise stars in the corners are egg shaped and the faster the scope the worser that gets



#16 F.Meiresonne

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Posted 05 May 2021 - 12:44 AM

My brother is a star-cluster fanatic (fan of looking at star clusters more than galaxies or nebulae) he always asking me to photograph the star clusters. I guess he read or watched something about how an advanced alien civilization would aim to live in a star cluster instead of lonely solar systems, due to abundance of resources from stars being near. Doubtful there would be day or night though on a planet (if that's even possible) circling around a star deep in the cluster. 

Yeah, we can't really imagine how it must be up there in the cluser especially towards the centre. I have read once it never gets fully dark there should there be planets around the many millions of suns...

The universe is just incredible , and we do have the technical possibilities to photograph it , relatively simple from our backyards . About half a century ago this was almost not possibly..we are blessed witht he equipment we can get at reasonable prices these days..amazing also...

 

About equipment, today my T3i rebel was delivered, debayered by a fellow CN member here..It is now a mono camera...so i can start to shoot narrowband as use that as Luminance..


Edited by F.Meiresonne, 05 May 2021 - 12:47 AM.

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#17 Boeglewatcher

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Posted 05 May 2021 - 01:49 AM

Yeah, we can't really imagine how it must be up there in the cluser especially towards the centre. I have read once it never gets fully dark there should there be planets around the many millions of suns...

The universe is just incredible , and we do have the technical possibilities to photograph it , relatively simple from our backyards . About half a century ago this was almost not possibly..we are blessed witht he equipment we can get at reasonable prices these days..amazing also...

 

About equipment, today my T3i rebel was delivered, debayered by a fellow CN member here..It is now a mono camera...so i can start to shoot narrowband as use that as Luminance..

That’s a very interesting way you go, Freddy, using an OSC debayered. Could you share your experience once you have started using it/getting first results? Which filter you use, how you combine the lights, etc.

 

cs Joachim 



#18 F.Meiresonne

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Posted 05 May 2021 - 02:45 AM

That’s a very interesting way you go, Freddy, using an OSC debayered. Could you share your experience once you have started using it/getting first results? Which filter you use, how you combine the lights, etc.

 

cs Joachim 

I will but we have a member here on the forum 'The Elf'. He uses exactly the same camera's and actually it was him that explained this all to me. I could process some of his stacks with and without Luminance. The difference is just amazing.

 

Take a look at his website

https://elf-of-lothlorien.de


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