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10x70 Hoopla

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#1 Fiske

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 02:34 PM

I'm opening up a new topic to talk about any 10x70 you want -- brand spanking new or dusty second hand, doesn't matter. Nikon, Fujinon, Resolux, Parks, etc. just go for it. If you're excited about 10x70 binoculars, or don't know why anyone would bother with them, or are wondering what you might be missing out on, share it here.

 

grin.gif

 

Fiske

 

PS: I heard back from Orion and they are offering up a rebate for the Resolux 10x70 I purchased, which came marked as a 10x50. Now the biggest 10x50 around and (justifiably) nicknamed "Big Jon" (though I still paid well north of $100 for it). To their credit, Orion also offered to replace it with a correctly labeled 10.5x70 with free return shipping for BJ but I've bonded with the mislabeled Resolux now and have deputized it as a valued member of my binocular posse.


Edited by Erik Bakker, 04 May 2021 - 02:54 PM.

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#2 Echolight

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 02:47 PM

In another thread, one of CN's bino gurus suggested that the "10x70 is a classic night sky binocular".

https://www.cloudyni...type/?p=9123891

 

I love a 7x50 for daytime. Can't wait for the new to me Parks 10x70 to arrive so I can give'm a whirl under the stars!

The Parks chose me more than I chose it. But I'm easy like that. Easy like Sunday mornin.

 

No rebate. But less than.

Order Summary

Subtotal

$18.89

Tax

$2.59

Shipping

$8.68

Handling

$3.75

Order Total

$33.91

 

I guess if I can't muster up enough spit, I can send them off for a cleaning.


Edited by Echolight, 04 May 2021 - 02:55 PM.

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#3 j.gardavsky

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 02:56 PM

Good idea, Fiske!

 

I am here with my Nikon Astroluxe 10x70 red ring,

and with the 10.5x70 BA8, multiply rebranded, I have selected my pair from TS.

 

Both of them are my horses for races on the large galactic nebulae, have logged 333 of them through these binoculars.

Most of these 333 have been observed or revisited during the last 3 years, since I have decided to put the galactic nebulae on my main observing program.

 

Clear skies,

JG


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#4 Fiske

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 03:04 PM

Good idea, Fiske!

 

I am here with my Nikon Astroluxe 10x70 red ring,

and with the 10.5x70 BA8, multiply rebranded, I have selected my pair from TS.

 

Both of them are my horses for races on the large galactic nebulae, have logged 333 of them through these binoculars.

Most of these 333 have been observed or revisited during the last 3 years, since I have decided to put the galactic nebulae on my main observing program.

 

Clear skies,

JG

Wow! What an inspiration, JG.

 

We're talking about dark site observing here, I take it? grin.gif But what a fantastic program. Sign me up for sure.

 

Soon I'll have a similar pair of 10x70s -- Astrolux red-ring (waiting for the shipping notice from Kyoei now) and the Resolux, which is a rebranded 10.5x70 BA8 (under its deceptively modest 10x50 camouflage).

 

Fiske


Edited by Fiske, 04 May 2021 - 03:05 PM.

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#5 Erik Bakker

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 03:07 PM

Personally, I love the form factor and views of the classic 10x70 porro, especially if of good quality.

 

Their brightness is a step up from smaller aperture instruments, adding signficant sparkle to the objects under scrutany.

 

My first introduction to these instruments was the first iteration of the Fujinon FMT-SX 10x70 in the late 1980’s. Great instrument.

 

And boy did it show more than the Zeiss 10x40 at that time  smile.gif


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#6 Erik Bakker

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 03:11 PM

I now own the Nikon 10x70 SP as some of you know. An astonishing instrument that brings tremendous joy everytime I use it, especially under supreme skies.


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#7 PEterW

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 03:14 PM

Sell me the concept, I like wide angled view and have some nice 10x50 and a 70mm angled pair… should I go big, go 7x50 or one of these 10x70 thingies??

Peter

#8 Echolight

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 03:31 PM

In my limited experience, 7x is a little low on power for pulling in faint stars, or even detail on the moon.

My 10x50 (7.8 degrees) is quite a bit wider than the 10x70 (5 degrees) on the way. But 5 degrees isn't too awful, and most 10x70's are a little wider.


Edited by Echolight, 04 May 2021 - 03:33 PM.


#9 j.gardavsky

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 03:33 PM

Wow! What an inspiration, JG.

 

We're talking about dark site observing here, I take it? grin.gif But what a fantastic program. Sign me up for sure.

 

Soon I'll have a similar pair of 10x70s -- Astrolux red-ring (waiting for the shipping notice from Kyoei now) and the Resolux, which is a rebranded 10.5x70 BA8 (under its deceptively modest 10x50 camouflage).

 

Fiske

Hello Fiske,

 

my backyard is nominally Bortle 4, sometimes Bortle 3, the nearby sports airfield 30 minutes to drive is one Bortle better, sometimes nur 1/2.

 

When I find something not yet reported on the forums, or not frequently reported by others, then I put a sketch in my gallery, https://www.cloudyni...-documentation/

in a good hope that someone will bite and follow, or someone will find it helpful at least

 

As Erik has written above,

the Nikon Astroluxe 10x70 red ring are truly astonishing. The precission of the optics assembly by Nikon makes the difference.

 

Looking forward to your first impressions on the Nikon Astroluxe 10x70 red ring, and on the BA8,

JG


Edited by j.gardavsky, 04 May 2021 - 04:16 PM.

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#10 TOMDEY

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 04:00 PM

I'm opening up a new topic to talk about any 10x70 you want -- brand spanking new or dusty second hand, doesn't matter. Nikon, Fujinon, Resolux, Parks, etc. just go for it. If you're excited about 10x70 binoculars, or don't know why anyone would bother with them, or are wondering what you might be missing out on, share it here.

 

grin.gif

 

Fiske

 

PS: I heard back from Orion and they are offering up a rebate for the Resolux 10x70 I purchased, which came marked as a 10x50. Now the biggest 10x50 around and (justifiably) nicknamed "Big Jon" (though I still paid well north of $100 for it). To their credit, Orion also offered to replace it with a correctly labeled 10.5x70 with free return shipping for BJ but I've bonded with the mislabeled Resolux now and have deputized it as a valued member of my binocular posse.

Mislabeled as smaller --- funny!

 

I once had a 14-inch Meade SCT that was proudly marked with the specs of their 16-incher right around the rim on the OTA. I eventually sold it to a friend, and that so annoyed him that he got the factory to send him the properly-labeled rim and he swapped it out.    Tom


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#11 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 04:48 PM

I have a pair of the Resolux 10.5 x 70s.  They're spec'd at a 5.0 degree field.

 

They're good binos, sharp pretty much across the field, plenty of eye relief, hefty but super steady handheld for as long as i can hold them..

 

They were a lucky purchase. A local guy bought them new,  They were 5 years old, with Orion solar filters they were $100.

 

I use them some but primarily they introduced me to the modern large aperture binocular with IF. My previous large aperture binos were older Japanese models like the 15x63 mini giants and 11x80s and 20x80s.  The Resolux's had more eye relief and better eyepieces, a very different experience.

 

So I picked up a pair of 15 x 70 Resolux's for $200 that get the majority of my 70mm bino use.

 

I'd use them more if I had a way to use O-lll, UHC and H-Beta filters with them but lacking that capability, I do that sort of low power, large exit pupil filter observing with telescopes. My 4 inch TV does 4.9° at 13x and the 80 mm will do 6.6 degrees.

 

I'm keeping both the 10.5 x 70s and 15 x 70s. They're a good fit for my uses and I'm more than happy the both the over all  quality and the quality of the view.

 

Jon


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#12 gwlee

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 05:00 PM

I would buy a 10x70 if I could find one with (1) excellent optics, (2) 20mm eye relief, (3) and 6.5* FOV to match my Fujinon 10x50 FMT-SX. For now, I am using a 72mm f6 refractor with an AMICI prism that provides a correct image. With 27mm (4*@16x) and 35mm Panoptic (5.1*@12x) EPs that offer plenty of ER.

 

I often use a 7x50 FMT-SX and like a 7mm exit pupil, and an extra 20mm would be nice, but short ER and narrow FOV are show stoppers for me. 



#13 The Ardent

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 05:01 PM

Here’s your chance , Fujinon 10x70 on AM

https://astromart.co...x-70-binoculars



#14 gwlee

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 05:25 PM

Here’s your chance , Fujinon 10x70 on AM

https://astromart.co...x-70-binoculars

For me, the 10x70 FMT-SX doesn’t have enough FOV to replace my 10x50 FMT-SX for astronomy, and I don’t want to own more binoculars than I own now, but it’s tempting. 


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#15 gwlee

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 05:54 PM

Sell me the concept, I like wide angled view and have some nice 10x50 and a 70mm angled pair… should I go big, go 7x50 or one of these 10x70 thingies??

Peter

I am in my 70s, but still like using a 7x50 for astronomy. It has a wider FOV (7.50*), it’s easier  to handhold, still a bit brighter to my eyes, and more comfortable to look through for long sessions than my 10x50. If limited to one, think I would probably keep the 10x50 for this site though, which is around Bortle 3-4. 


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#16 GabrielKnight

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 07:09 PM

I gave serious though to purchasing a Fujinon 10x70 FMT-SX last year but was talked out of the same by my wife on account of owning a Pentax 10x50 PIF. Given that we live in a light polluted area, she rightly questioned whether there'd be any added benefit as our trips to dark sky sites are relatively infrequent. In brief, we both came to realise that a 10x70's additional light gathering power may well eventuate in a washed out sky background if used in suburbia. These days, courtesy of onerous work commitments, that's unfortunately where we do the bulk of our viewing. :-(

At day's end, I'm glad that I didn't pick up the Fujinon as a Nikon 18x70 showed up at half price during Amazon Australia's Boxing Day sales. At best, I can only justify one binocular purchase a year to my significant other and I'm glad that 2020 provided something so 'iconic'.

G.K.
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#17 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 07:19 PM

In brief, we both came to realise that a 10x70's additional light gathering power may well eventuate in a washed out sky background if used in suburbia.

 

 

For what it's worth, from my San Diego backyard, I see more in my 10.5x70s than I do in my 10x50s.

 

Sydney metropolitan population is about 6.5 million, San Diego-Tijuana is about 5 million.

 

That said, I would not buy 10x70s for my backyard..

 

Jon


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#18 GabrielKnight

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 07:38 PM

Jon,

Agreed.

As an aside, it's worth mentioning that the Milky Way can be seen clearly from certain parts of Sydney - namely the northern beaches. The city encompasses some 12,368 square kilometres and driving roughly 30-45km from the city centre can lead you a relatively secluded spot in the distant burbs (eg Terrey Hills, Narrabeen Beach, Whale Beach, Palm Beach, Barrenjoey Headland) that's popular with professional and amateur astrophotographers alike.

On a separate note, one could say that over 90% of Australia likely qualifies as a dark sky site given the sheer size of the continent. Whilst in the outback, I've experienced nights so clear that the starlight alone has proved sufficient to cast shadows. Truly breathtaking stuff.

My problem, as of late, has been finding the time to make those trips. If yes, I've no doubt that a decent 10x70 would well and truly come into its own.

G.K.
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#19 EverlastingSky

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 07:40 PM

For about a year I owned the first iteration (pre-2002) of the Fujinon 10x70 FMT-SX. I did exhaustive side by side tripod mounted comparisons with the Fujinon 10x50 FMT-SX in an effort to decide which to keep.

 

In the 10x70, the star colors were vibrant and had that "sparkle" that Erik mentioned, as compared to the 10x50 FMT-SX. Red stars were rich and jumped out to my eyes. Also the 10x70 offered a very relaxed ease of viewing due to the higher eye relief and classic 50-degree afov. The two things most unexpected were: 10x70 by day rendered tree bark and the red seed pods of Dogwoods quite dramatically richer and brighter than the 10x50. I mean really much better than the 10x50 to my eyes. The daytime first quarter Moon appeared to have a warm yellow hue by comparison to the clinical chalky white of the 10x50. Huh? I couldn't believe it. The old leaded glass and optical coatings VS the new glass and coatings? And I was able to discern, by day or night, fine pin point craters easier in the 10x70. The winner was the 10x50 FMT-SX due to immersive afov and light weight compact size. Plus the important fact that in no way could I glimpse, under my skies, any improvement in, especially, the detection of threshold galaxies.

 

But I want a better 10x70 anyway for when I get to dark skies. Nikon 10x70 most likely. The newer post 2002 Fujinon appears to have a handful of slight advantages over the Nikon however, according to SMark in his comparisons, who sold the Nikon 10x70 and kept the new style Fuji 10x70.

 

I like the Nikon build quality (have the 18x70) and dislike the post 2002 Fujinon revision with the rubber prism coverings etc.,(had the post 2002 Fuji 16x70 for 10 years) plus the smell of the adhesive Fujinon uses to bond the rubber is irritating and really distracts.

 

Picture this: The observer is immersed in a star field vista with parallelogram mounted Fuji 10x70/16x70/10x50, nostrils crushed into the absurd oversized eye pieces, when all of a sudden... this stink of glue and rubber just seeps in and wrecks the experience. Yeah. Big reason I sold the 16x70 was that right there ubetcha.gif


Edited by EverlastingSky, 04 May 2021 - 07:43 PM.

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#20 The Ardent

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 07:45 PM

I love the smell of the Fujinons, since 1997. Can’t explain why. 
 


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#21 GabrielKnight

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 07:52 PM

EverlastingSky,

I also have a preference for the classic porro aesthetic that features a bare metal housing, but can honestly say that the smell of a given binocular - including my 16x70 FMT-SX2 - has never proven problematic.

LoL ... I'm in the office right now, but will be sure to take good, hard, long sniff of the Fujinon's partially rubber armoured body once at home. I'll have to do so in private so as to avoid any uncomfortable questions.

#ScentOfABinocular

G.K.

Edited by GabrielKnight, 04 May 2021 - 07:53 PM.

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#22 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 08:07 PM

Jon,

Agreed.

As an aside, it's worth mentioning that the Milky Way can be seen clearly from certain parts of Sydney - namely the northern beaches. The city encompasses some 12,368 square kilometres and driving roughly 30-45km from the city centre can lead you a relatively secluded spot in the distant burbs (eg Terrey Hills, Narrabeen Beach, Whale Beach, Palm Beach, Barrenjoey Headland) that's popular with professional and amateur astrophotographers alike.

On a separate note, one could say that over 90% of Australia likely qualifies as a dark sky site given the sheer size of the continent. Whilst in the outback, I've experienced nights so clear that the starlight alone has proved sufficient to cast shadows. Truly breathtaking stuff.

My problem, as of late, has been finding the time to make those trips. If yes, I've no doubt that a decent 10x70 would well and truly come into its own.

G.K.

 

G.K.

 

Sydney is much more like San Diego County, it's 11720 square kilometers and includes beaches, mountains up to almost 2000 meters as well as deserts.. The 200 inch on Palomar is in the northern part of county and our place in the high desert is about 100km east of the city.  The milky way is easily seen.

 

But Australia is nearly the size of the US with about 8% off the population.. there's got to be dark skies 

 

Jon


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#23 dries1

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 09:15 PM

A 10X70 is great for the aforementioned dark skies in Australia, however having a Nikon 10X70 here on the east coast or if  near a big city, a premier 10X50 or 10X56 roof would perform just as well, and with wider views. I seldom use my Nikon 10X70, the 18X70, well that is a different story.

 

Andy W.



#24 Fiske

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 10:05 PM

Good idea, Fiske!

 

I am here with my Nikon Astroluxe 10x70 red ring,

and with the 10.5x70 BA8, multiply rebranded, I have selected my pair from TS.

 

Both of them are my horses for races on the large galactic nebulae, have logged 333 of them through these binoculars.

Most of these 333 have been observed or revisited during the last 3 years, since I have decided to put the galactic nebulae on my main observing program.

 

Clear skies,

JG

JG,

 

Have you published a list of the 333 LGNs you have observed? Or made any posts about how your observing programs are arranged?

 

I own three Kunming binoculars -- OB 10 x50 Ultra, Orion 10.5x70 Resolux, and OB 15x70 Ultra. I'm pleased with all three and regard them as upper mid-level in quality compared with premier glass like the Nikon SPs or Fujinon FMTs which are at the top end. At any rate, plenty good for serious observing and enjoyment. I tend to use the x70s on an OB PM1 p-gram mount. Generally I find exactly what Erik has described -- the x70s add sparkle and color intensity compared with the x50, albeit in a smaller FOV.

 

My skies are Bortle 7 suburban, but the differences are noticeable to my eyes, which is not a criticism of the x50s. I'm not choosing between them.

 

A surprise about the 10x70s for me is that I do not find them more difficult to hand hold than the 50s. If anything, they are easier to hold steady.

 

Fiske


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#25 nowhere

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Posted 04 May 2021 - 11:17 PM

You're really endangering my bank account with this you know - I've been saving and planning on getting a high magnification 70mm binocular (either the Fujinon or Nikon) and now you're convincing me I gotta get me a 10X70 too!




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