Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Baader Maxbright II vs. Orion Linear

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 jgroub

jgroub

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1,465
  • Joined: 17 Jul 2014
  • Loc: Denver, CO

Posted 04 May 2021 - 06:45 PM

I already own the Arcturus BVs.  However, the problem I experience with them is that the eyepiece centering isn't so great.  I've had two sets; the problem is consistent across both of them.  This misalignment of the eyepieces means that the views in each eyepiece are too different; to the point where it's difficult to merge the views from each eye.  Therefore, it's hard for me to get the pseudo-3D effect from the Arcturus BVs.  

 

I'm looking to step up.  These two BVs  - the Baader and the Orion - are a good step up from all the intro BVs that cost around $200-$300.  They're also priced the same at about $500 each.  I guess they'd be called intermediate level BVs, which is all I'm looking for - and all I can afford - right now.

 

All of my gear is listed below; it's all cassegrains and refractors.  Which of these two would work better with my scopes?  How's the eyepiece centering on each of these?  Anyone got any experience from using both of these BVs that they'd care to share?  Thanks. 


  • Virtus likes this

#2 jprideaux

jprideaux

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 440
  • Joined: 06 May 2018
  • Loc: Richmond, VA

Posted 04 May 2021 - 07:55 PM

I have the linear but not the Baader. I also have the Williams Optics BV which would fall into your intro category. I have only used them so far in fast refractors. I have to use the 1.6x Barlow with the WO BV to get infinity focus (with using diagonal). The linear can get infinity focus under the same conditions as an eyepiece without the BV. There are a couple drawbacks to the linear. It is more prone to internal reflections and with the smaller field-stop, you are limited with your eyepiece selection. People report that the sweet spot with the linear is a 18mm 50 degree eyepiece. I have a couple on order that I should be getting any day now. Also, since the linear has back-focus to spare, you can use a reducer with it to make-up for not being able to use longer focal-length eyepieces. The linear also has a strange bokeh (out-of focus effect) for certain terrestrial usages like watching birds through branches. For astronomy, that won’t matter. With my current equipment, I prefer the WO BV for the moon and the linear for lower power usage.

Others can comment on the ways to shave off back-fiocus distance for the Baader BV to allow either no barlow-like device or a much more mild one to get better low-power.
  • jimandlaura26 likes this

#3 Virtus

Virtus

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 229
  • Joined: 09 Mar 2021
  • Loc: SE NC

Posted 05 May 2021 - 09:08 AM

I don't have direct experience with either but seems like the only advantage to the Orion would be less back-focus requirement if you're using them in a refractor.

 

With the Maxbright you could connect them directly to a T2 prism diagonal to reduce the light path but still not sure that would be enough to use without a GPC in most refractors.

 

I've got a Baader clicklock diagonal which works exceptionally well so can't imagine there is any issues with their use in the binoviewers.

 

Being in a similar boat as an Arcturus owner I can say I would upgrade to the Maxbright II in a second if I had an extra $500 laying around. I absolutely love everything I own from Baader. 

 

I would also definitely be interested for further opinions from those that have experience with one or both of these models.



#4 hoof

hoof

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,917
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005
  • Loc: Monroe, WA

Posted Yesterday, 04:28 PM

For me one huge advantage of the linears is they can work with paracorrs. I know there is a binoviewer that has an accessory option that can correct for coma (I forget which) but that restricts you to just binoviewers that can use that particular corrector. Of course, if you don’t have a fast newt that you want to observe with, then that isn’t an issue.
  • David I likes this

#5 Spartinix

Spartinix

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 773
  • Joined: 25 Apr 2017
  • Loc: Crete, Greece

Posted Today, 01:51 AM

With traditional binoviewers, a Paracorr can be used when there's a barlow (or Powermate etc.) between the Paracorr and the binoviewer.



#6 hoof

hoof

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,917
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005
  • Loc: Monroe, WA

Posted Today, 12:30 PM

With traditional binoviewers, a Paracorr can be used when there's a barlow (or Powermate etc.) between the Paracorr and the binoviewer.


How does that work, and how do you compute the correct spacing?


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics