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Beginners Advice Needed

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7 replies to this topic

#1 Mr Smith

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Posted 06 May 2021 - 09:45 AM

Hi Peeps,

 

I am completely new to photography and have just bought some second hand kit to get me started. See Below.

 

Panasonic GX1 Lumix 

Samyang 12m F2

7Artisans 7.5mm F2.8

Skywatcher Star Adventurer Mini

Ball mount

TRipod 

Cheap Ebay lens heater

 

I aim to get to know my camera in the day but will predominantly use it for astro work. My first goal is Milky Way/Landscape shots.

 

So my first question question is what Iso/exposure and amount of shots would you take on your first few outings.

 

I have been researching lots of great images on Instagram and I notice how much difference there is in Exposure Time/Iso/Number of shots (For Stacking). 

 

So I am all set up and the conditions are perfect.... What combinations of shots would you make?

 

ie

 

5 x 5sec at 1600 iso

10 x 5sec at 1600 iso

5 x 10 sec at ............. etc etc the combinations are numerous and I know conditions/kit will play a big factor but just need a guide of where to start so I can find out what works best for my kit.

 

Any help much appreciated!

 

 

 

 

 

 



#2 Idkwhatsgoingon

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Posted 06 May 2021 - 08:57 PM

Hi, I also sort of new to this! Check out Nebula Photos on youtube, he has full guides for imaging galaxies and nebulae and processing them in software like gimp and Siril which are free.


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#3 galacticinsomnia

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Posted 06 May 2021 - 10:15 PM

Hi Peeps,

 

I am completely new to photography and have just bought some second hand kit to get me started. See Below.

 

Panasonic GX1 Lumix 

Samyang 12m F2

7Artisans 7.5mm F2.8

Skywatcher Star Adventurer Mini

Ball mount

TRipod 

Cheap Ebay lens heater

 

I aim to get to know my camera in the day but will predominantly use it for astro work. My first goal is Milky Way/Landscape shots.

 

So my first question question is what Iso/exposure and amount of shots would you take on your first few outings.

 

I have been researching lots of great images on Instagram and I notice how much difference there is in Exposure Time/Iso/Number of shots (For Stacking). 

 

So I am all set up and the conditions are perfect.... What combinations of shots would you make?

 

ie

 

5 x 5sec at 1600 iso

10 x 5sec at 1600 iso

5 x 10 sec at ............. etc etc the combinations are numerous and I know conditions/kit will play a big factor but just need a guide of where to start so I can find out what works best for my kit.

 

Any help much appreciated!

Completely new to photography, and completely new to astronomy ?

Okay..  Just search youtube on beginning landscape, and astrophotography landscapes.

Other than that, it will be trial and error.
No one can really just tell you what to do, there are foundational steps that you just can't afford to skip.  Shutter Speed, ISO, Aperture, just to name a few, as well as how to use your gear.

Congrats on getting your kit, start shooting and try problem solving from your own backyard :)

I'm totally willing to help you, but you really should take some first steps.  Know your gear !  Know how to make adjustments, etc etc.

It may seem daunting, but it really is't that bad or that hard.

Maybe try regular photography first to get your feet wet.

Try this.
Take your camera and take your lens.  Set your ISO to 1600, set your Aperture to f2.8.  Focus on a star.  Set exposure for 10 seconds.

Too bright ?  Set for 5, too dark set for 15, try again.

Just point it up, anywhere in the star filled sky, and be amazed at what you can capture. 

Clear Skies !!


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#4 Mr Smith

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Posted 07 May 2021 - 12:56 AM

Completely new to photography, and completely new to astronomy ?

Okay..  Just search youtube on beginning landscape, and astrophotography landscapes.


Maybe try regular photography first to get your feet wet.

Try this.
Take your camera and take your lens.  Set your ISO to 1600, set your Aperture to f2.8.  Focus on a star.  Set exposure for 10 seconds.

Too bright ?  Set for 5, too dark set for 15, try again.

 

 

 

Hi there,

 

Thank you for the guidance. I have watched lots of tutorials and researched images with settings info included but will keep researching waytogo.gif

 

Your advice of 5 second steps for aperture is very helpful. I will first try all ISO settings (starting at 1600) and adjust as advised.

 

2 questions if you have time.

 

1. Why F2.8? some people advise F2 and some F2.8.... Peripheral distortion?

2. Lots of tutorials say over exposed images not a problem as can be reduced in photoshop etc. When checking lcd screen onsite should they all look as near to finished articles when I've found the right settings? I understand layering etc will reduce noise but just not sure what to expect. They looked good on LCD during a small trial I did the other night but they were all blurred when loaded up (focusing issue which I have I think sorted).

 

I am new to photography so a steep learning curve but I worked with lenses for over 15 years and have a basic practical knowledge in astronomy so locating subjects and setting up mounts etc I can do in the dark without any trouble.

 

Thank you for your help.smile.gif


Edited by Mr Smith, 07 May 2021 - 01:23 AM.


#5 boxcorner

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Posted 07 May 2021 - 04:41 AM

I recom

 

Hi Peeps,

 

I am completely new to photography and have just bought some second hand kit to get me started ...

 

I recommend that you read 'The Deep-Sky Imaging Primer (2nd Edition)' by Charles Bracken ISBN 9780999470909. Whilst you might not be interested in deep-sky astrophotography, it will help you understand the fundamentals of astrophotography. It is not inexpensive, but it will be a worthwhile investment. Meanwhile, you might find this helpful https://astrobackyar...trophotography/


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#6 Desertanimal

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Posted 07 May 2021 - 01:08 PM

The best way I learn is to go out and do it. You can’t really break anything by taking pictures. Some will be total garbage and some will surprise you!

Get out there in the dark and just do it!
(After you learned some basics of course) 😉
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#7 galacticinsomnia

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Posted 07 May 2021 - 03:21 PM

Hi there,

 

Thank you for the guidance. I have watched lots of tutorials and researched images with settings info included but will keep researching waytogo.gif

 

Your advice of 5 second steps for aperture is very helpful. I will first try all ISO settings (starting at 1600) and adjust as advised.

 

2 questions if you have time.

 

1. Why F2.8? some people advise F2 and some F2.8.... Peripheral distortion?

2. Lots of tutorials say over exposed images not a problem as can be reduced in photoshop etc. When checking lcd screen onsite should they all look as near to finished articles when I've found the right settings? I understand layering etc will reduce noise but just not sure what to expect. They looked good on LCD during a small trial I did the other night but they were all blurred when loaded up (focusing issue which I have I think sorted).

 

I am new to photography so a steep learning curve but I worked with lenses for over 15 years and have a basic practical knowledge in astronomy so locating subjects and setting up mounts etc I can do in the dark without any trouble.

 

Thank you for your help.smile.gif

I didn't research all your lenses, but at first, I would shoot wide open.  I'm just used to most my canon lenses starting at f2.8  3rd party primes usually start at f1.4 or f1.8.

You can stop your lenses down as much as you want, often with an increase in sharpness, but you sacrifice light gathering ability in doing so. 
It's all about the balance of ISO, Shutter Speed, and Aperture.

Clear Skies. !


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#8 Mr Smith

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Posted 10 May 2021 - 03:52 PM

I recom

 

I recommend that you read 'The Deep-Sky Imaging Primer (2nd Edition)' by Charles Bracken ISBN 9780999470909. Whilst you might not be interested in deep-sky astrophotography, it will help you understand the fundamentals of astrophotography. It is not inexpensive, but it will be a worthwhile investment. Meanwhile, you might find this helpful https://astrobackyar...trophotography/

Thats great, I will have a look.

 

Where in France are you?




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