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How to observe the Moon?

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#1 Chris K

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Posted 07 May 2021 - 08:14 PM

I've not spent much time on our nearest neighbor and would like to start.

 

After all, it's clear to me that moonlit nights are clear and moonless nights are cloudy :)

 

I thought to myself, it would be nice to sit in the backyard and observe it.

 

Naturally I know that I can just point my scope or binoculars and have a look around, just wondering if there are any techniques or methods that are favored? For example should I use an atlas? Do you look at an interesting area on the atlas and try to find it on the moon?

 

Hope you get the idea of what I'm asking. Thanks in advance.

 

Chris



#2 Ken Watts

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Posted 07 May 2021 - 08:27 PM

I usually first take in the moon with a low to medium power eyepiece to see if any structures stand out.  Then I switch to higher power and take in the interesting areas.  Many times, with high power, I just let the moon drift across my field of view.  If I see something I don't know, I slip into the house and look up information on the structure.  Many nights I like to just take in the majesty of our nearest neighbor.

 

I hope this helps you.  

 

Clear and steady skies!


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#3 B 26354

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Posted 07 May 2021 - 08:32 PM

Do a search for Atlas of the Moon by Antonin Rukl... and then order this copy, immediately, before someone else does:

 

https://hpb.com/prod...n-9780913135174

 

This is the lunar atlas.

 

grin.gif


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#4 Barlowbill

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Posted 07 May 2021 - 08:43 PM

Luna is always cool to observe.  When full, or nearly so, it is bright.  Some of us like to use moon filters to tone down the brightness.  IMO, the best time is when it is crescent.  Then you can really see the sun's light on the moon's features.


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#5 cookjaiii

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Posted 07 May 2021 - 10:19 PM

Check out this article.

 

https://astronomy.co...-moon-observing



#6 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 01:18 AM

A simple lunar map is available at https://skyandtelesc...ads/MoonMap.pdf

 

The free Virtual Moon Atlas can be downloaded at http://www.ap-i.net/avl/en/start

 

The Sky & Telescope Lunar 100 is posted at https://skyandtelesc...the-lunar-100/ 

 

The Astronomical League's lunar program lists can be seen at https://www.astrolea...hecklist v4.pdf and https://www.astrolea..._II_Targets.pdf


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#7 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 01:34 AM

The articles at the following links offer suggestions regarding observing the Moon:

https://www.celestro...erving-the-moon

 

https://skyandtelesc...-to-watch/moon/

 

https://astronomy.co...erving-the-moon

 

https://astronomy.co...-moon-observing

https://astronomy.co...ay--on-the-moon


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#8 firefoe

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 12:35 PM

I found an app for the iPad - Moon Globe. You can have a normal view that yours eyes see or you can change to telescope view so what is on the screen is the same orientation as what you see in your eyepiece. Also has red night vision option just in case you want to also view stars. It is free and all the other options being told to you are also great but do yourself a favor and at least download it. You can get it on your phone also but I hate the small screen. A tablet is nice. 99 % of the features are labeled so you can really learn the moon, not just observe it. You can also zoom in to get a great view


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#9 Jim1804

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 11:01 PM

+1 on the Astroleague Lunar Observing Program. It really helped me to learn my way around the moon, and to find and see some of the best features. Lots of fun over a couple of summer months.
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#10 BFaucett

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Posted 09 May 2021 - 05:00 AM

71tOx3iJlIL._AC_UY218_.jpg
 
Discover the Moon
by Jean Lacroux, Christian Legrand
Publisher : Cambridge University Press (2004)
Paperback : 144 pages

Language : English

 
Amazon:
https://www.amazon.c...x/dp/0521535557
(Use the Look Inside feature on Amazon for a preview.)
 
Abebooks:
https://www.abebooks...bc-_-ISBN-_-all
 

Cambridge University Press:
 
"The Moon is accessible to everyone. Because it is easy to observe everywhere, even in big cities, it is a prime target for aspiring astronomers and for those who are merely curious about the night sky. This easy-to-use guide to discovering lunar sites takes the reader through fourteen observing sessions from New Moon to Full Moon. For each evening, the book shows which craters, mountains and other features can be seen, and how to find them. Each photograph shows what the observer actually sees through a telescope, solving the usual difficulties of orientation confronting beginners. Images are shown as they appear through both refracting and reflecting telescopes. Maps printed on the book's front and back flaps show the whole Moon with sites as seen through a refractor, through a Newtonian reflector, or, when turned upside-down, through binoculars. Jean Lacroux has been a columnist for the French astronomy magazine Ciel et Espace for 25 years. He has published four successful amateur astronomy books in French. Christian Legrand is an engineer and amateur astronomer, who has been a passionate lunar observer since the Apollo missions."
 
https://www.cambridg...n=9780521535557
 

 

Cheers! Bob F. smile.gif


Edited by BFaucett, 09 May 2021 - 05:22 AM.

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#11 Chris K

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Posted 09 May 2021 - 06:51 PM

Thank you all for the information. Sorry i didn't think to see if any articles existed.


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