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Milky Way and a Skyguider

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#1 damarks913

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 04:29 PM

Went out last night for the first time this year and got some Milky Way nightscape shots. But this time used the Skyguider Pro and took 2 minute exposures. Last year, without the tracker, I was shooting 20 seconds.

 

Will the longer exposures be better, or simply introduce more noise with such an already starry target?

 

Using a Rokinon 24mm wide at 2.8, 800iso

 

 

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#2 Kevin_A

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 04:53 PM

Longer is less noisy and way better with wide angle lenses due to very small clear apeture size of 24mm lens. 


Edited by Kevin_A, 08 May 2021 - 04:54 PM.


#3 vidrazor

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 05:17 PM

Nice shot! Dunno if that's sunset or sky glow, but it looks good in the shot.

What camera are you shooting with? If it's a Nikon, just drop your ISO down to base and shoot as long as you can. Shoot a series of them around f/4 and stack them. You should be able to get a great amount of detail.


Edited by vidrazor, 08 May 2021 - 05:21 PM.

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#4 damarks913

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 05:29 PM

Nikon D600....so drop it to 100/200 @f4?

I'm not at compositing yet, so ground will be a blur.

Thank you both

#5 vidrazor

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 05:45 PM

Yeah drop it all the way down to 100 and shoot as long as you can. Yes you'll need to composite the forground if you're doing a shot with ground.

You can have fun with that too blasting a flash unit into the distance. I forget how it's done but I believe the D600 can do cumulative flash, so you lock off the camera on a tripod and keep stacking flash blasts on one frame. You can also do it in Photoshop stacking multiple frames using ADD layers if you can't cumulative flash.


Edited by vidrazor, 08 May 2021 - 10:27 PM.

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#6 damarks913

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 05:58 PM

Thank you again

#7 AndrewXnn

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 08:48 PM

https://www.photonst...acteristics.htm

 

The DxOMark site list the Unity ISO for the Nikon 600 at 472.9 and ISO invariant ISO 392.

 

So, wouldn't one of those values be best for that Camera?


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#8 vidrazor

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 10:36 PM

https://www.photonst...acteristics.htm

 

The DxOMark site list the Unity ISO for the Nikon 600 at 472.9 and ISO invariant ISO 392.

 

So, wouldn't one of those values be best for that Camera?

The D600, like many Sony sensor based Nikon bodies, is essentially ISO invariant. There's not a great difference shooting at higher ISOs. Regardless of camera brand however, you should never shoot with "in-between" ISOs, you should always be at 100, 200, 400, 800. etc. For the D600, perhaps ISO 200 would offer a bit of an advantage, but thereon in you're losing dynamic range and not really gaining an advantage.

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Edited by vidrazor, 08 May 2021 - 10:37 PM.


#9 vidrazor

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Posted 08 May 2021 - 10:47 PM

Thank you again

I should add that, unless you're controlling from the internal intervalometer, an external unit, or software, you may want to get Nikon's infrared wireless controller when doing flash shots if you want to experiment with that. It's cheap enough, and is a handy tool to have in your camera bag anyway.



#10 damarks913

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Posted 09 May 2021 - 08:25 PM

Another lesson...went out last night to the Superstitions east of Phoenix, which still left suburban lights to the southwest.

 

Longer exposure means more light pollution. 

 

The quest continues....maybe shoot with the L-pro clip filter.

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Edited by damarks913, 09 May 2021 - 08:35 PM.

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#11 Desertanimal

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Posted 09 May 2021 - 09:29 PM

Those are both pretty impressive shots though. I can’t say I mind the extra light pollution!

#12 vidrazor

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Posted 10 May 2021 - 12:57 AM

Another lesson...went out last night to the Superstitions east of Phoenix, which still left suburban lights to the southwest.

Longer exposure means more light pollution. 

The quest continues....maybe shoot with the L-pro clip filter.

The light pollution doesn't really mar the shot, all the colors blended look good. If you want you can just do some compositing work in Photoshop/Affinity Photo/GIMP, and make a synthetic flat and a little color work and you can tone it all down like I did below, but really it looks fine as is. Is the falloff on the edges something you did, or is that your lens falloff? Your lens has some noticeable coma, you should stop it down to  f/4 or 5.6 and increase your tracking time to compensate, your stars at the edges will become pinpoint.

Nice shot!

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Edited by vidrazor, 10 May 2021 - 01:01 AM.

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#13 Mr Smith

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Posted 10 May 2021 - 01:21 AM

Great shots and good info guys! Keep up the good work damark913!

 

Nice shot! Dunno if that's sunset or sky glow, but it looks good in the shot.

What camera are you shooting with? If it's a Nikon, just drop your ISO down to base and shoot as long as you can. Shoot a series of them around f/4 and stack them. You should be able to get a great amount of detail.

 

Sorry for the newbie question. Why f/4? all info I am reading guides me to f 2.8...



#14 vidrazor

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Posted 10 May 2021 - 09:02 AM

Great shots and good info guys! Keep up the good work damark913!

Sorry for the newbie question. Why f/4? all info I am reading guides me to f 2.8...

Because the lens is exhibiting coma at the edges. Look at how the stars look like "little birds flying" at the edges of the second image. If you stop the lens down, you reduce the coma. You also reduce vignetting at the edges that occurs wide open. Sometimes you have to stop down a few stops to get rid of coma altogether, hence my suggestion to stop down to f/5.6. Of course, then you need to either increase the exposure time or the ISO. Because the D600 has a really clean sensor, he could raise the ISO up a bit, but because he's tracking and has a wide angle lens, he can increase the exposure time, although he will have to composite the foreground in.

 

Of course, you should always shoot at the maximum aperture you can. The optical quality of the lens will dictate how much you can do that. It's always a trade-off, and balance, of options available to you. Samyang (Rokinon) is about to release a pair of lenses aimed at astrophotographers than can shoot wide open and be sharp to the edges.


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#15 Mr Smith

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Posted 10 May 2021 - 10:06 AM

Because the lens is exhibiting coma at the edges. Look at how the stars look like "little birds flying" at the edges of the second image. If you stop the lens down, you reduce the coma. You also reduce vignetting at the edges that occurs wide open. Sometimes you have to stop down a few stops to get rid of coma altogether, hence my suggestion to stop down to f/5.6. Of course, then you need to either increase the exposure time or the ISO. Because the D600 has a really clean sensor, he could raise the ISO up a bit, but because he's tracking and has a wide angle lens, he can increase the exposure time, although he will have to composite the foreground in.

 

Of course, you should always shoot at the maximum aperture you can. The optical quality of the lens will dictate how much you can do that. It's always a trade-off, and balance, of options available to you. Samyang (Rokinon) is about to release a pair of lenses aimed at astrophotographers than can shoot wide open and be sharp to the edges.

Well explained thank you.

 

I noticed the vignetting and assumed this was reshaping the stars. I have always know coma showing as colour fringing not distorted images, so much to learn!



#16 damarks913

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Posted 10 May 2021 - 01:22 PM

thank you all for more great tips



#17 damarks913

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 09:36 PM

At iso 400, about 1.5 hours, but cropped like crazy with z61.

 

Still, seeing the pillars show up keeps me going...

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#18 vidrazor

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Posted 13 May 2021 - 12:27 AM

At iso 400, about 1.5 hours, but cropped like crazy with z61.

Still, seeing the pillars show up keeps me going...

Nice. You're getting a little trailing tho, might want to shorten your subs a bit. How long were your subs? Perhaps cut them back about 1/4-1/3. Sometimes polar alignment is off, the better you can polar align, the longer you can shoot.

 

Nice work, keep cracking at it!
 



#19 damarks913

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Posted 13 May 2021 - 05:13 PM

Nice. You're getting a little trailing tho, might want to shorten your subs a bit. How long were your subs? Perhaps cut them back about 1/4-1/3. Sometimes polar alignment is off, the better you can polar align, the longer you can shoot.

 

Nice work, keep cracking at it!
 

thank you, and yes, without guiding (next hurdle), I have to remember, longer is not necessarily better.




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