Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Naked eye map of the moon

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Jef De Wit

Jef De Wit

    Skylab

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 4,037
  • Joined: 06 Mar 2009
  • Loc: Hove, Belgium (51°N 4°E)

Posted 08 May 2021 - 04:46 PM

For more than 10 years I have been looking at the moon with all kinds of binoculars and telescopes, in many cases with a sketch as a result. But I never looked closely with the naked eye… until mid-April. The weather reports looked good for a long time and at the start of Ramadan (April 13) I started my project. I managed to observe our satellite for 15 days without any optical aids (my glasses aside). Not always at the perfect time (which I think is slightly before sunset) due to clouds or other commitments, but that couldn't spoil the fun.

 

I used my solar observation paper to indicate the details seen (sketching is actually too big a word). Fortunately, this turned out to be fine in terms of size. I scanned everything and pasted a simulation from Virtual Moon Atlas next to it for analysis. If necessary, I turned my moon in the correct orientation. Based on all observations, I drew the lunar map below:

 

maan blote oog synthese afgewerkt comp.png

 

For the first three days I could not see any detail on the moon, although according to the simulation, Mare Crisium should have been visible on the 3rd moonday. No problem, the narrow crescent moon was also a feast for the (naked) eye. On the 4th moonday I was finally able to get a glimpse of Mare Crisium. It is striking that in most sketches this sea is much smaller than its actual size. The next days also Mare Fecunditatis, Nectaris, Tranquillitatis, Serenitatis and Vaporum came into view. Even the southern appendix of Mare Tranquillitatis - Sinus Asperitatis - was visible. It is striking that the seas in the eastern hemisphere are much more contrasting than their counterparts on the other side of the moon.

 

maan blote oog synthese labels comp.png

 

On the 8th moonday I saw something other than a sea for the first time: a lighter stripe through Mare Serenitatis. This "stripe" is on 4 other sketches and I think it could be the Bessel ray. From the 11th moonday, I noticed some lighter areas that are clearly related to large craters: Copernicus, Tycho, Kepler and Aristarchus. Of course you don't see the crater itself (they are too small to detect), but the ejected material has a lighter color than the rest of the moon. The Kepler and Aristarchus ejecta usually fused into one elongated lighter zone. The bright area of ​​Tycho appears to be north of the crater itself. However, I could not identify one lighter area on the southeastern edge. A search on the internet reveals that it is the combined ejecta of two young but small craters south of the much more famous crater Petavius: Stevinus A (8 km) and Furnerius A (12 km). I had never heard of this duo ... they are on my observation list now.

 

As the terminator moved toward the western lunar rim, visibility of the western seas grew better. Mare Nubium and Humorum are more striking and better defined than Mare Imbrium and Oceanus Porcellarum. I was unable to detect Mare Frigoris. The closer to the full moon, the lower the moon was in the sky when the sun disappeared behind the horizon (as mentioned earlier, I think the best time to study the moon with the naked eye). I was able to make one more observation after the full moon, but the following days the moon rose too late. Since there is most detail to be gathered around the full moon, a similar observing project in winter would probably have been more beneficial (with full moon higher in the sky). This would likely benefit the western lunar rim.


Edited by Jef De Wit, 08 May 2021 - 04:49 PM.

  • Special Ed, Magellanico, rodelaet and 17 others like this

#2 Jef De Wit

Jef De Wit

    Skylab

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 4,037
  • Joined: 06 Mar 2009
  • Loc: Hove, Belgium (51°N 4°E)

Posted 08 May 2021 - 04:47 PM

Some draft work:

 

maan blote oog_0002 comp.png


  • Special Ed, Magellanico, Vlad and 9 others like this

#3 mdowns

mdowns

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 3,060
  • Joined: 12 Jun 2010
  • Loc: Englewood,FL

Posted 08 May 2021 - 05:17 PM

Very interesting and somewhat different approach Jef. This is a 'fun' post to read and see.                    Michael


  • Jef De Wit likes this

#4 frank5817

frank5817

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 16,784
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Mesa, Arizona

Posted 08 May 2021 - 09:24 PM

Jef,

 

These are good. The more you look at the Moon without a telescope, the more you will see. I have a 3" circular pieces of polarizing filter material that I have attached to an internal black cardboard cylinder just for looking at the moon naked eyed; mounted on a equatorial tripod it is hands free. Works nice for daytime or nighttime viewing.

I did this mostly when I was younger and had excellent vision.

 

I like theses sketches you made.

 

Frank :)


  • Jef De Wit and ButterFly like this

#5 Jef De Wit

Jef De Wit

    Skylab

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 4,037
  • Joined: 06 Mar 2009
  • Loc: Hove, Belgium (51°N 4°E)

Posted 09 May 2021 - 02:25 AM

I have a 3" circular pieces of polarizing filter material that I have attached to an internal black cardboard cylinder just for looking at the moon naked eyed; mounted on a equatorial tripod it is hands free. Works nice for daytime or nighttime viewing.

Good idea! Is it bino or just for one eye?


  • rodelaet likes this

#6 niteskystargazer

niteskystargazer

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8,607
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2009
  • Loc: 41-43'-28" N 87-42'-39" W

Posted 09 May 2021 - 10:31 AM

Jef.

 

Very good sketch of Naked eye map of the moon smile.gif .

 

CS,KLU,

 

thanx.gif ,

 

Tom


  • Jef De Wit likes this

#7 guilaume

guilaume

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 14
  • Joined: 28 Jun 2019
  • Loc: 43°43'N; 1°35'E

Posted 12 May 2021 - 12:04 AM

Hello,

it is very interesting.

Thank you.


  • Jef De Wit likes this

#8 frank5817

frank5817

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 16,784
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Mesa, Arizona

Posted 12 May 2021 - 01:01 AM

Jef,

 

"Good idea! Is it bino or just for one eye?"

 

Just one, even when I use binoculars I only take the lens caps off of one side. Legally blind in one eye.

 

Frank


  • rodelaet and Jef De Wit like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics