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#1 Sacred Heart

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Posted 09 May 2021 - 09:49 AM

Hello,  Can a one shot color camera take a H Alpha image like a monochrome camera can??  I really like the way your H Alpha images show the detail of nebulas,  can a one shot color camera duplicate that??  Also,  is H Alpha just ,sorry for the wording, good for galaxies and star clusters as well???

 

Thanks for taking the time to read as well as answer,      Joe



#2 Forward Scatter

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Posted 09 May 2021 - 10:11 AM

Hi Joe

Yes, one can but the sensitivity does take a hit as only 1/4 of the pixels is used. For nebs with a OSC, using dual band filters such a L-eXtreme, L-eNhance, Triad, etc., can give great results as the OIII & Hbeta emission is captured as well:

 

 
Heart Neb 12282020
 
These filters aren't really that good for galaxies & clusters. Best to do broadband and/or a UV/IR cut filter if imaging those to decrease star bloat.
 
Cheers!
J

Edited by Forward Scatter, 09 May 2021 - 10:14 AM.

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#3 jonnybravo0311

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Posted 09 May 2021 - 10:27 AM

Caveat to what was written in the previous post: the OSC camera sensor needs to be sensitive to the Ha wavelengths. Your normal, everyday DSLR is _not_ sensitive to this light. That's why you get them Ha-modified or astro-modified. Dedicated astrophotography cameras do not need such modifications because no filter was put in front of the sensor in the first place.

 

Filters like the Optolong L-eXtreme take advantage of the OSC sensor by only allowing certain wavelengths of light to pass. In the L-eXtreme's case, the light allowed to pass are the Ha and O3 wavelengths (Ha maps to the R channel and O3 maps to both the G and B channels). Because they only allow a very narrow band of light to pass, they are only good for objects that emit that type of light: nebulae. The filter is a terrible choice fo shooting galaxies or other broadband emitters. You can, however, use it to supplement data taken without the filter. In other words, if you target, say M101, you might take 8 hours of RGB data using your OSC (no filters) and then maybe take 4 hours of data using your OSC with the L-eXtreme (and use the R channel as Ha to enhance the first data).


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#4 Sacred Heart

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Posted 09 May 2021 - 10:47 AM

Thanks for your quick responses.    One other thing,  is there a way to shut off the color filter of that Bayer matrix??  To get a B&W shot??     

 

Thanks again,   Joe



#5 matt_astro_tx

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Posted 09 May 2021 - 10:58 AM

Unfortunately not. The Bayer matrix is a literal, physical component on top of the pixels themselves. It’s integrated into the CMOS chip. There’s no way to remove or disable it.

The Wikipedia article on it is a decent read. https://en.wikipedia...ki/Bayer_filter

That being said, I recently made the jump from DSLR to an Astro cam and opted for a color camera to ease the transition. I’m glad I did. Monochrome cameras are tremendously more powerful, but come with a lot more work. As it is, I have a great many things to learn and not having to deal with filter wheels and RGB compositing is a blessing. I spent $625 on a used Astro cam and my next one will be a mono if/when I decide to take the leap. For now though I’m having a blast.

Edited by matt_astro_tx, 09 May 2021 - 11:08 AM.



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