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A Mogey Restoration

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#101 Bomber Bob

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Posted 19 May 2021 - 05:00 PM

+1 for Tru oil is indeed very easy to use and can simply apply with your fingers. The more coats you put on, the more glass like the finish becomes. If you don’t want glass like then simply rub the final coat with 0000 steel wool to dull the finish to your liking all the way to matte finish. Extremely easy stuff to work with. 

Y'all convinced me -- just ordered a bottle.



#102 rcwolpert

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Posted 19 May 2021 - 05:37 PM

Me too.



#103 starman876

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Posted 19 May 2021 - 05:40 PM

OK  I ordered a bottle and try it.


Edited by starman876, 19 May 2021 - 05:41 PM.


#104 starman876

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Posted 19 May 2021 - 09:47 PM

Started painting the mount cast iron parts.  Will take pictures tomorrow when it is all together.


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#105 starman876

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Posted 20 May 2021 - 07:40 PM

The mount is pretty much done.  Will touch up a few areas when I have time.  Now to redo the tripod legs.

 

 

mogey mount1.JPG


Edited by starman876, 20 May 2021 - 07:40 PM.

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#106 Kasmos

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Posted 20 May 2021 - 08:00 PM

Looks Great!

Geez, that was fast, was the paint even dry? 


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#107 starman876

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Posted 20 May 2021 - 08:37 PM

Looks Great!

Geez, that was fast, was the paint even dry? 

Thanks.   Was nice and dry and hot today.  Great day for painting the last few pieces.   Looking forward to trying this set up under the stars.   I need to make a universal joint slow motion control.


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#108 mpsteidle

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Posted 21 May 2021 - 09:01 AM

Every day I log on to CN in anticipation of this project.  Can't wait to see it all together!


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#109 Bomber Bob

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Posted 21 May 2021 - 10:21 AM

Green + Gold Brass -- Gorgeous!!


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#110 starman876

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Posted 21 May 2021 - 12:03 PM

Every day I log on to CN in anticipation of this project.  Can't wait to see it all together!

Thanks   



#111 starman876

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Posted 21 May 2021 - 12:04 PM

Green + Gold Brass -- Gorgeous!!

Thanks JW

 

I am finding the legs a bit harder to strip



#112 Kasmos

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Posted 21 May 2021 - 02:04 PM

Thanks JW

 

I am finding the legs a bit harder to strip

I was wondering how they were going. With painted wood there's always the problem of paint left in the grain. I anticipate that problem with some white-washed legs I need to strip.


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#113 starman876

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Posted 21 May 2021 - 02:32 PM

I was wondering how they were going. With painted wood there's always the problem of paint left in the grain. I anticipate that problem with some white-washed legs I need to strip.

It looks like they are Oak.   I find between Aircraft remover and Brush cleaner I am making headway.  For some reason the paint on the legs (same paint as on everything else) is more stubborn to remove.  I think maybe between all the conference calls I am on all day and trying to strip paint I am waiting to long to remove the stripper and it is dry before I can get back to it.  


Edited by starman876, 21 May 2021 - 02:33 PM.


#114 Bomber Bob

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Posted 21 May 2021 - 02:39 PM

Yeah, the wood legs on my 1960s Eagle surveyor tripod were off-white washed...  I lightly sanded, & got 95% of it off, then used a dark stain, but you can still see the in-grain paint up close.  Adds character...


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#115 apfever

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Posted 21 May 2021 - 06:28 PM

Oak has a very open grain. Sometimes the deep pores can be seen like a super fine honey comb.  Paint that gets deep into the pores may not be removeable without scraping down the wood. Get it minimal and use a loupe to look at what is left imbedded. The best you might be able to do is reduce it to acceptance. A shop nightmare is using a green pencil eraser on Oak. The green particles get into that open grain and really stand out, impossible to completely remove without scraping down. 

 

About that open grain on oak. Some of the softer hand applied finishes, TUNG oil in particular, can run through the open grain and out the other side of the board! Saturation like this can cause the wood to bleed out for years. I tend to use a finish that has a distinct drying characteristic instead of an aging characteristic. 


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#116 starman876

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Posted 21 May 2021 - 09:43 PM

Oak has a very open grain. Sometimes the deep pores can be seen like a super fine honey comb.  Paint that gets deep into the pores may not be removeable without scraping down the wood. Get it minimal and use a loupe to look at what is left imbedded. The best you might be able to do is reduce it to acceptance. A shop nightmare is using a green pencil eraser on Oak. The green particles get into that open grain and really stand out, impossible to completely remove without scraping down. 

 

About that open grain on oak. Some of the softer hand applied finishes, TUNG oil in particular, can run through the open grain and out the other side of the board! Saturation like this can cause the wood to bleed out for years. I tend to use a finish that has a distinct drying characteristic instead of an aging characteristic. 

Might be easier to just make new legs.  I got the pattern.  Would be easy to cut new oak pieces.



#117 clamchip

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Posted 21 May 2021 - 10:18 PM

My Tinsley legs are white oak.

I used Acetone to draw out what appeared to be motor oil from the leg tips, possibly to 

keep them from rotting.

I also scrubbed the legs with Acetone and steel wool to remove the last of the old

finish.

Robert   

 

post-50896-0-55959700-1430782290_thumb.jpg


Edited by clamchip, 21 May 2021 - 10:19 PM.

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#118 starman876

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Posted 22 May 2021 - 07:31 AM

I was thinking of getting a piece of gutter the right length and just soaking the legs in brush cleaner.   It seems to remove the old paint.   Acetone is a bit hard to work with as it eats up rubber gloves.


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#119 Jim Curry

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 06:33 AM

After seeing how you brought the mount back to life This is going to be an elegant resto.
Jim

Edited by Jim Curry, 24 May 2021 - 06:34 AM.

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#120 starman876

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 09:32 AM

After seeing how you brought the mount back to life This is going to be an elegant resto.
Jim

Thanks Jim it has been interesting.   Working on those tripod legs between conference calls.  I might have to sand them.  



#121 starman876

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 06:33 AM

MY bottle of tung oil came in. Sure is a little bottle.



#122 starman876

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 02:34 PM

ordered the parts I need to make a slow motion extension. Wood handle, brass rod and a universal joint
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#123 LU1AR

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 03:55 PM

My Tinsley legs are white oak.

I used Acetone to draw out what appeared to be motor oil from the leg tips, possibly to 

keep them from rotting.

I also scrubbed the legs with Acetone and steel wool to remove the last of the old

finish.

Robert   

 

attachicon.gifpost-50896-0-55959700-1430782290_thumb.jpg

Firearm restorers often use plaster to remove the oil from the wood.
They cover the wood with plaster diluted in water and leave it to dry in the sun, or in a very low temperature oven.
As the plaster dries, it absorbs the oil.
The dents are removed by resting on the wet plaster an electric iron with a cloth. As the plaster dries, it generates steam and the dent retracts.
I hope it is useful to someone.

Regards.
Edgardo


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#124 starman876

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 04:12 PM

Firearm restorers often use plaster to remove the oil from the wood.
They cover the wood with plaster diluted in water and leave it to dry in the sun, or in a very low temperature oven.
As the plaster dries, it absorbs the oil.
The dents are removed by resting on the wet plaster an electric iron with a cloth. As the plaster dries, it generates steam and the dent retracts.
I hope it is useful to someone.

Regards.
Edgardo

Interesting.  I knew about the iron trick to remove dents in wood.  Never knew about the plaster trick.



#125 semlin

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 04:40 PM

i have not heard of plaster.  i am familiar with using sawdust soaked in acetone applied as a poultice to suck the stain out.  the trick is to seal it off from the air completely with a plastic bag and tape and give it a couple of days in a cool place.  plaster might be less messy.




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