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How Many Globular Star Clusters Have You Seen?

Beginner Binoculars Charts DSO Observing SCT
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#1 SNH

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 07:55 AM

In Harold Corwin’s new Galactic Globular Cluster List, he lists 158 globular clusters (GCs) that he believes could be or have been seen visually. Here is an Excel copy of his findings that was created by Tom Polakis – which I’m currently hosting in my Google Drive. I have found that his new magnitudes are a much better fit than those in William Harris’s catalog.

 

From my latitude in northern Arkansas (36.1°), only 12 never rise. So that leaves me with at least a glimmer of a shot at seeing 146 GCs. Currently, by using no more than my 10-inch SCT, I have seen 109 GCs, but I’m almost at the end of what I can do with this telescope. Which ones I’ve seen break down to:

 

12 – naked-eye

46 – handheld 7x35 binoculars

22 – handheld 8x56 binoculars

7 – handheld 12x54 binoculars

5 – 130mm tabletop Dobsonian (including 3 Palomars)

17 – 10-inch Meade SCT (including 5 Palomars, 5 Terzans)

 

Interesting findings:

*With no more than a pair of handheld Celestron 8x56 binoculars, I have seen 80 globular clusters.

*Of the 158 globular clusters on Corwin’s list, only 29 are technically in the Northern Celestial Hemisphere – the other 129 are below the Celestial Equator. I had never quite realized that before!

*Corwin’s list has 111 GCs having magnitudes brighter than +11.0, and only 11 of them are permanently below my horizon. Seems I have “access” to all but nearly a dozen bright ones!

 

But here is a question for everyone. Does the idea of a “Globular Cluster Marathon” ring a bell? For some reason, I seem to believe that I once read about the idea of trying to see 120 in a single night in a Sky & Telescope from the early 2000’s. For the life of me though, I can’t seem to find that article. Anybody remember what I’m talking about?

 

Oh, and please share how you have done on GCs. They are one of the rarest of the DSOs in our Galaxy, so as they say in Pokémon -- "Gotta catch 'em all"!

 

Scott


Edited by SNH, 12 May 2021 - 07:57 AM.

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#2 KidOrion

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 08:53 AM

I have seen all NGC/Messier globulars visible from 37 N, eight Palomars, Terzan 7, the Eridanus globular, HP1, Djo2, AL3, ESO 452-11, and Arp 2. The majority of those were with a 12.5" f/5, although two (ESO and Arp2) were with an 18" f/5.5 and the Eridanus globular and Pal 13 were with a 17.5" from central New Mexico (somewhat farther south than the 37 N cutoff).


Edited by KidOrion, 12 May 2021 - 08:54 AM.

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#3 timokarhula

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 08:57 AM

I have logged 216 globular clusters visually with mostly up to 10-inch scopes.  Well, I'm cheating a little bit when I count extra-galactic globulars as well.  Many (most) of the globulars in the Magellanic Clouds are not old "bona fide" globular clusters as in the Milky Way.  I have viewed 125 GC's in our galaxy.

 

/Timo Karhula


Edited by timokarhula, 12 May 2021 - 09:02 AM.

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#4 astro rocketeer

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 10:00 AM

In Harold Corwin’s new Galactic Globular Cluster List, he lists 158 globular clusters (GCs) that he believes could be or have been seen visually. Here is an Excel copy of his findings that was created by Tom Polakis – which I’m currently hosting in my Google Drive. I have found that his new magnitudes are a much better fit than those in William Harris’s catalog.

 

From my latitude in northern Arkansas (36.1°), only 12 never rise. So that leaves me with at least a glimmer of a shot at seeing 146 GCs. Currently, by using no more than my 10-inch SCT, I have seen 109 GCs, but I’m almost at the end of what I can do with this telescope. Which ones I’ve seen break down to:

 

12 – naked-eye

46 – handheld 7x35 binoculars

22 – handheld 8x56 binoculars

7 – handheld 12x54 binoculars

5 – 130mm tabletop Dobsonian (including 3 Palomars)

17 – 10-inch Meade SCT (including 5 Palomars, 5 Terzans)

 

Interesting findings:

*With no more than a pair of handheld Celestron 8x56 binoculars, I have seen 80 globular clusters.

*Of the 158 globular clusters on Corwin’s list, only 29 are technically in the Northern Celestial Hemisphere – the other 129 are below the Celestial Equator. I had never quite realized that before!

*Corwin’s list has 111 GCs having magnitudes brighter than +11.0, and only 11 of them are permanently below my horizon. Seems I have “access” to all but nearly a dozen bright ones!

 

But here is a question for everyone. Does the idea of a “Globular Cluster Marathon” ring a bell? For some reason, I seem to believe that I once read about the idea of trying to see 120 in a single night in a Sky & Telescope from the early 2000’s. For the life of me though, I can’t seem to find that article. Anybody remember what I’m talking about?

 

Oh, and please share how you have done on GCs. They are one of the rarest of the DSOs in our Galaxy, so as they say in Pokémon -- "Gotta catch 'em all"!

 

Scott

Congrats Scott! What’s the eyepiece you’re using with your Meade 10” SCT to get good views of the clusters? Any recommendation? Thanks!

Michael



#5 MisterDan

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 10:09 AM

My guess is that you're recalling the August 2000 issue which contains "Observer's Notebook:  A Challenging-Globular Cluster Marathon" in the Observer's Log section.

 

In 2014, Astronomy magazine offered a "marathon" list of 109 globs for the month of March:

https://astronomy.co...luster-marathon

The page includes a PDF download link.

Note: M5's magnitude is certainly not 11, so the list may reference other errors, as well.

 

I'm not certain of my own experiences, as I never formally logged my globular cluster observations, but methinks I've seen 7-ish, eyes only.  Various binoculars and telescopes have likely provided for several dozen others.  I doubt I'd be able to compile an "exact" list -- too many informal observations and "give-it-a-try" peeks, over the past decades.  My "most-notable" eyes-only observation was a binoculars-first "discovery" of M55 (was able to manage it without the binoculars).  This took place in way-down south Texas, during my youth, when my eyes were far more capable sigh2.gif .

 

Best wishes.

Dan


Edited by MisterDan, 12 May 2021 - 10:31 AM.

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#6 Alan D. Whitman

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 11:18 AM

I have logged 216 globular clusters visually with mostly up to 10-inch scopes.  Well, I'm cheating a little bit when I count extra-galactic globulars as well.  Many (most) of the globulars in the Magellanic Clouds are not old "bona fide" globular clusters as in the Milky Way.  I have viewed 125 GC's in our galaxy.

 

/Timo Karhula

Well, I'm behind Timo but he has spent a lot more time in Australia than I have.

 

I have seen 194 globular clusters: 127 in our galaxy and 67 in other galaxies.

 

The best was a globular cluster in Centaurus A that Steve Gottlieb and I saw using the 30-inch at OzSky star party using a photographic chart provided by Australian expert Andrew Murrell. It was magnitude 17.2. It is the only one of my globulars that I don't have a catalogue number for, but when somebody of Murrell's stature says that "this star" on a photograph is really a globular, I believe Andrew.

 

I have not seen any new globulars since 2016 since every Milky Way globular that I have not seen is below my Canadian horizon.

 

Alan Whitman


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#7 Alan D. Whitman

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 01:26 PM

 Many (most) of the globulars in the Magellanic Clouds are not old "bona fide" globular clusters as in the Milky Way. 


/Timo Karhula

Hi Timo,

 

I am not a professional astronomer, but for decades I have felt that those professionals who said that a young LMC globular was not a globular simply because it didn't fit their definition that globular clusters had to be ancient were too hung up on their definition.

 

Well, the brand new July, 2021 issue of Sky&Telescope, now online, includes an article by Heidelberg University astrophysicist J.M. Diederik Kruijssen which is a breath of fresh air. It recognizes R136 in the heart of 30 Doradus within the Tarantula Nebula as a brand new LMC globular cluster which would be only a few million years old! I have long thought that it would eventually be recognized as a brand new globular cluster.

 

Globular clusters require extreme environments to form, and those environments were much more common when the universe was young. But that does not mean that those extreme environments do not exist in some places today where there are extreme tidal interactions, such as the merging galaxies NGC 4038/9, the Antennae. They are not counted on my list of globulars, but I suspect that the nine stellarings that are starburst regions in the Antennae that I saw with a 25-inch in Australia, all confirmed from professional images, will be considered infant globular clusters someday as science advances and definitions become less hidebound.

 

I do count my young LMC globulars.

 

Best,

 

Alan Whitman


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#8 Starman1

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 02:08 PM

In Harold Corwin’s new Galactic Globular Cluster List, he lists 158 globular clusters (GCs) that he believes could be or have been seen visually. Here is an Excel copy of his findings that was created by Tom Polakis – which I’m currently hosting in my Google Drive. I have found that his new magnitudes are a much better fit than those in William Harris’s catalog.

 

From my latitude in northern Arkansas (36.1°), only 12 never rise. So that leaves me with at least a glimmer of a shot at seeing 146 GCs. Currently, by using no more than my 10-inch SCT, I have seen 109 GCs, but I’m almost at the end of what I can do with this telescope. Which ones I’ve seen break down to:

 

12 – naked-eye

46 – handheld 7x35 binoculars

22 – handheld 8x56 binoculars

7 – handheld 12x54 binoculars

5 – 130mm tabletop Dobsonian (including 3 Palomars)

17 – 10-inch Meade SCT (including 5 Palomars, 5 Terzans)

 

Interesting findings:

*With no more than a pair of handheld Celestron 8x56 binoculars, I have seen 80 globular clusters.

*Of the 158 globular clusters on Corwin’s list, only 29 are technically in the Northern Celestial Hemisphere – the other 129 are below the Celestial Equator. I had never quite realized that before!

*Corwin’s list has 111 GCs having magnitudes brighter than +11.0, and only 11 of them are permanently below my horizon. Seems I have “access” to all but nearly a dozen bright ones!

 

But here is a question for everyone. Does the idea of a “Globular Cluster Marathon” ring a bell? For some reason, I seem to believe that I once read about the idea of trying to see 120 in a single night in a Sky & Telescope from the early 2000’s. For the life of me though, I can’t seem to find that article. Anybody remember what I’m talking about?

 

Oh, and please share how you have done on GCs. They are one of the rarest of the DSOs in our Galaxy, so as they say in Pokémon -- "Gotta catch 'em all"!

 

Scott

Not counting those I only saw in Australia, 123.

A few more only seen in Oz, including the best one of all, NGC104

Oh, and about 45 of them in M31.


Edited by Starman1, 12 May 2021 - 02:09 PM.

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#9 CowTipton

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 05:06 PM

My DSO observations so far:

 

6 globular clusters (M2, M15, M79, M5, M13, M92)

16 open clusters (M45, NGC2169, M41, NGC2244, M50, M39, NGC7209, NGC869, NGC884, M47, M35, NGC2158, M37, M36, M46, M44)

7 galaxies (M31, NGC404, M65, M66, M104, M51, NGC5195)

5 nebulae (M42, M27, M1, M43, NGC2024)

 

Total

25 Messier objects

9 NGC objects

 

Since November 2, 2020

 

None before that.  I'm a newb at DSOs.


Edited by CowTipton, 12 May 2021 - 05:11 PM.

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#10 stargzr66207

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 05:20 PM

105 for me, including:

All the Messier globulars

9 Palomars

One IC

1 Arp

1 Terzan

1 Ton

2 in M-31 galaxy

1 in Sculptor Dwarf galaxy

 

Ron Abbott


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#11 Sheol

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Posted 12 May 2021 - 06:02 PM

                        My logs are still sadly in some box in the garage after the failed move 3 years ago (!!!). But I do know, I have seen just about every Glob in Scorpius & Sagitarius That has a Messier number or an NGC number. A couple in Ophichius have eluded me, but only a couple. I really was a serious Globular hunter with my 8 inch for 3-4 years. I cannot say when I slipped away from the hobby at the time. Never totally, but for the years between 2010-2013 I really tried to be outside at night EVERY time I could. Globs were my favorite object to hunt, though I really enjoy OCs.. The rest of the GCs in the Northern Hemisphere I logged, as well. I also got some southern targets, like the one in Corona Austarlis..

 

                       Clear Skies,

                          Matt.



#12 stevenrjanssens

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Posted 13 May 2021 - 11:50 PM

Globular clusters require extreme environments to form, and those environments were much more common when the universe was young. But that does not mean that those extreme environments do not exist in some places today where there are extreme tidal interactions, such as the merging galaxies NGC 4038/9, the Antennae. They are not counted on my list of globulars, but I suspect that the nine stellarings that are starburst regions in the Antennae that I saw with a 25-inch in Australia, all confirmed from professional images, will be considered infant globular clusters someday as science advances and definitions become less hidebound.

JWST is soon likely to reveal the progenitors of today's old globular clusters. At that point we'll have a much better idea if these young massive clusters we see nearby are analogous or not.



#13 Redbetter

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Posted 14 May 2021 - 02:13 AM

I haven't spent much time in the past determining which globulars I can see naked eye or with various levels of binoculars, so I don't have them arranged that way.  I have spent more effort in trying to determine which ones could be partially resolved with 60/70/80mm scopes and with the 20".

 

Last night I did take some time to determine which ones I could detect naked eye.  (I cheated a little and use my myopia flippers, but those actually reduce magnification...and the ones I used last night had a film that I needed to clean away today, so that was hurting the observations noticeably because it caused some dewing over one eye lens.)  I checked off M3, M4, M5, M10, M13, M22, M92 and M15.  I have seen M12 before without the flippers from a darker site, but couldn't get a lock on it last night.  I have seen Omega Centauri naked eye many times, but didn't look for it in the trees last night.  I didn't think to look for M2, and I don't know that I have tried it naked eye before, but I suspect it would be within reach.  M55 proved to be too low (and lit somewhat by the valley light dome) even though it is well placed away from the Milky Way.  From 5+ degrees further south and with dark southern horizon this one should be visible.  The further south the more that a person should be able to pick up.   Anyway, looks like I have seen at least 10 naked eye.  

 

With the 20" I have observed at least 127 Milky Way globulars including all of the Palomars and Terzans, Djorg 1&2&3, Laevens 1&3, Ton 1&2, Whiting 1, HP 1, Eridanus, Arp 2 , AL-3, and a couple of ESO's .  I have also observed 5 in Fornax (not included in the total) that were formerly listed as MW globulars, along with various extra-galactic globulars not on the list.  There are some others I could detect down very low, but I have not targeted them.  One that I might have observed with the 8" back when I lived further south is NGC 3201, but I don't have it logged and keep forgetting about it when it is decently placed where I can actually see it between trees...maybe next year.

 

I have also logged that PWM 78.2 that seems to have evaded Corwin's table.  He also seems to miss the alternate/better designation for the Crater globular as Laevens 1.  I haven't fully compared the rest.


Edited by Redbetter, 14 May 2021 - 05:49 AM.

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#14 Allan Wade

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Posted 14 May 2021 - 05:31 AM

I spent a couple of years researching Milky Way globular clusters to build a current list. I have 159 on my list, but a few are certainly not visually visible as they were discovered in IR. There are only 2 globs not visible from 32S and I observed them both at Okie-Tex a couple of years ago. I’ve seen most of the clusters on my list except for the tough threshold ones  and some of the Palomars and Terzans I still haven’t got around to. It’s definitely one of the programs I want to finish, but the last years problems have curtailed my plans.

 

Naked eye I’m at 16 globular clusters. I don’t consider that particularly special, I’m just lucky to be located in the south where all the globs are easy to see.


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#15 REC

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Posted 14 May 2021 - 02:32 PM

Nice post! Lot's of globs to look forward to :)



#16 Voyager 3

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Posted 15 May 2021 - 04:44 AM

I haven't spent much time in the past determining which globulars I can see naked eye or with various levels of binoculars, so I don't have them arranged that way.  I have spent more effort in trying to determine which ones could be partially resolved with 60/70/80mm scopes and with the 20".

 

Last night I did take some time to determine which ones I could detect naked eye.  (I cheated a little and use my myopia flippers, but those actually reduce magnification...and the ones I used last night had a film that I needed to clean away today, so that was hurting the observations noticeably because it caused some dewing over one eye lens.)  I checked off M3, M4, M5, M10, M13, M22, M92 and M15.  I have seen M12 before without the flippers from a darker site, but couldn't get a lock on it last night.  I have seen Omega Centauri naked eye many times, but didn't look for it in the trees last night.  I didn't think to look for M2, and I don't know that I have tried it naked eye before, but I suspect it would be within reach.  M55 proved to be too low (and lit somewhat by the valley light dome) even though it is well placed away from the Milky Way.  From 5+ degrees further south and with dark southern horizon this one should be visible.  The further south the more that a person should be able to pick up.   Anyway, looks like I have seen at least 10 naked eye.  

 

With the 20" I have observed at least 127 Milky Way globulars including all of the Palomars and Terzans, Djorg 1&2&3, Laevens 1&3, Ton 1&2, Whiting 1, HP 1, Eridanus, Arp 2 , AL-3, and a couple of ESO's .  I have also observed 5 in Fornax (not included in the total) that were formerly listed as MW globulars, along with various extra-galactic globulars not on the list.  There are some others I could detect down very low, but I have not targeted them.  One that I might have observed with the 8" back when I lived further south is NGC 3201, but I don't have it logged and keep forgetting about it when it is decently placed where I can actually see it between trees...maybe next year.

 

I have also logged that PWM 78.2 that seems to have evaded Corwin's table.  He also seems to miss the alternate/better designation for the Crater globular as Laevens 1.  I haven't fully compared the rest.

How many have you seen with your 8" Red ? 



#17 Redbetter

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Posted 15 May 2021 - 05:09 AM

How many have you seen with your 8" Red ? 

I don't know.  Most of those observations were 20 to 25 years ago and would have been the Messier/NGC/IC globulars.  The only exotic ones might have been the few that also had NGC or IC designations.  I was about 5 degrees further south, so I probably got most of the same southerly NGC's, perhaps even a few more since I had a good southern horizon to work with.  However, I wasn't systematic about observing globulars then, so I likely missed many southern ones too (other than the full complement of Messiers.)

 

The only extragalactic globulars I recall from the 8" days were Andromeda's GC1 and Fornax's NGC 1049.  


Edited by Redbetter, 15 May 2021 - 05:41 PM.

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#18 PJBilotta

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Posted 15 May 2021 - 07:20 PM

Love globulars - some my favorites. This discussion prompted me to do a globular marathon last night, just for kicks. I spent about 3 hours hunting my way from Hydra through Hercules and bagged just about every Messier and NGC globular mag. 10.4 and brighter visible from my view-restricted backyard, and even a couple of 11s. Seeing wasn't great, but transparency wasn't too bad.

Observed 35 in all before hypothermia started to set in and dawn was on the horizon. That was fun - thanks for the prompt!

Edited by PJBilotta, 15 May 2021 - 07:22 PM.

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#19 SNH

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Posted 15 May 2021 - 08:51 PM

I have logged 216 globular clusters visually with mostly up to 10-inch scopes.  Well, I'm cheating a little bit when I count extra-galactic globulars as well.  Many (most) of the globulars in the Magellanic Clouds are not old "bona fide" globular clusters as in the Milky Way.  I have viewed 125 GC's in our galaxy.

 

/Timo Karhula

Well, that didn't take long! I wasn't even thinking about extragalactic ones. For me, I've seen 78 extragalactic globular clusters (including "blue clusters", "supermassive", ect.). To my TOTAL TOTAL is currently 187. That breaks down to 62 in M31, 9 in M33, 4 in Fornax Dwarf, 1 in NGC 6822, 1 in WLM, and 1 in NGC 4214.



#20 SNH

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Posted 15 May 2021 - 08:54 PM

Well, I'm behind Timo but he has spent a lot more time in Australia than I have.

 

I have seen 194 globular clusters: 127 in our galaxy and 67 in other galaxies.

 

The best was a globular cluster in Centaurus A that Steve Gottlieb and I saw using the 30-inch at OzSky star party using a photographic chart provided by Australian expert Andrew Murrell. It was magnitude 17.2. It is the only one of my globulars that I don't have a catalogue number for, but when somebody of Murrell's stature says that "this star" on a photograph is really a globular, I believe Andrew.

 

I have not seen any new globulars since 2016 since every Milky Way globular that I have not seen is below my Canadian horizon.

 

Alan Whitman

Hmm. When I get around to it, I'll try and research that one. If he were to show it to me, I'd still want to read some of the literature on it to confirm! No offense, but extragalactic globular clusters can be really tough to confirm I found after all my research into M33.


Edited by SNH, 15 May 2021 - 08:56 PM.


#21 SNH

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Posted 15 May 2021 - 08:58 PM

My DSO observations so far:

 

6 globular clusters (M2, M15, M79, M5, M13, M92)

16 open clusters (M45, NGC2169, M41, NGC2244, M50, M39, NGC7209, NGC869, NGC884, M47, M35, NGC2158, M37, M36, M46, M44)

7 galaxies (M31, NGC404, M65, M66, M104, M51, NGC5195)

5 nebulae (M42, M27, M1, M43, NGC2024)

 

Total

25 Messier objects

9 NGC objects

 

Since November 2, 2020

 

None before that.  I'm a newb at DSOs.

You are on your way! If it helps, I've seen 80 globular clusters with no more than my handheld 8x56 binoculars. So you should have plenty to enjoy going after in your 8-inch!


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#22 SNH

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Posted 15 May 2021 - 09:01 PM

105 for me, including:

All the Messier globulars

9 Palomars

One IC

1 Arp

1 Terzan

1 Ton

2 in M-31 galaxy

1 in Sculptor Dwarf galaxy

 

Ron Abbott

You've done well I see! You are at a similar latitude and use a similar sized telescope as myself. I'll have to check how many Palomar's I've seen (not sure I've gotten up to 9).

 

As to the Sculptor Dwarf, I think you mean Fornax Dwarf.



#23 SNH

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Posted 15 May 2021 - 09:08 PM

I haven't spent much time in the past determining which globulars I can see naked eye or with various levels of binoculars, so I don't have them arranged that way.  I have spent more effort in trying to determine which ones could be partially resolved with 60/70/80mm scopes and with the 20".

 

Last night I did take some time to determine which ones I could detect naked eye.  (I cheated a little and use my myopia flippers, but those actually reduce magnification...and the ones I used last night had a film that I needed to clean away today, so that was hurting the observations noticeably because it caused some dewing over one eye lens.)  I checked off M3, M4, M5, M10, M13, M22, M92 and M15.  I have seen M12 before without the flippers from a darker site, but couldn't get a lock on it last night.  I have seen Omega Centauri naked eye many times, but didn't look for it in the trees last night.  I didn't think to look for M2, and I don't know that I have tried it naked eye before, but I suspect it would be within reach.  M55 proved to be too low (and lit somewhat by the valley light dome) even though it is well placed away from the Milky Way.  From 5+ degrees further south and with dark southern horizon this one should be visible.  The further south the more that a person should be able to pick up.   Anyway, looks like I have seen at least 10 naked eye.  

 

With the 20" I have observed at least 127 Milky Way globulars including all of the Palomars and Terzans, Djorg 1&2&3, Laevens 1&3, Ton 1&2, Whiting 1, HP 1, Eridanus, Arp 2 , AL-3, and a couple of ESO's .  I have also observed 5 in Fornax (not included in the total) that were formerly listed as MW globulars, along with various extra-galactic globulars not on the list.  There are some others I could detect down very low, but I have not targeted them.  One that I might have observed with the 8" back when I lived further south is NGC 3201, but I don't have it logged and keep forgetting about it when it is decently placed where I can actually see it between trees...maybe next year.

 

I have also logged that PWM 78.2 that seems to have evaded Corwin's table.  He also seems to miss the alternate/better designation for the Crater globular as Laevens 1.  I haven't fully compared the rest.

As always Redbetter, I'm terribly impressed. You even came close to my naked-eye record! And with a telescope twice as big as mine, you have made good use of it getting 28 more GCs than myself. I have to say, you observe about like myself -- always making as much use of your telescope as humanly possible -- though you enjoy hunting faint supernova way more than I do!

 

I'd be interested in hearing your results with your "partially resolved" tests.

 

As to Corwin lot including PWM 78.2, I'll take a look at it on images and then maybe pass it along to him. I'll also pass along your suggestion to change the name of the Crater GC.



#24 SNH

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Posted 15 May 2021 - 09:12 PM

Love globulars - some my favorites. This discussion prompted me to do a globular marathon last night, just for kicks. I spent about 3 hours hunting my way from Hydra through Hercules and bagged just about every Messier and NGC globular mag. 10.4 and brighter visible from my view-restricted backyard, and even a couple of 11s. Seeing wasn't great, but transparency wasn't too bad.

Observed 35 in all before hypothermia started to set in and dawn was on the horizon. That was fun - thanks for the prompt!

Well, that's exciting for me to hear! Thank you so much for saying so. I'm currently working on getting either Terzan 1 or 5 in the mornings so that I can get to 110 myself.



#25 Alan D. Whitman

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Posted 16 May 2021 - 12:04 PM

Hmm. When I get around to it, I'll try and research that one. If he were to show it to me, I'd still want to read some of the literature on it to confirm! No offense, but extragalactic globular clusters can be really tough to confirm I found after all my research into M33.

When you do your research and write your E-books you presumably hope that people will observe from your E-books and record in their logbook that they saw an object that you said was a globular cluster even though they have never observed with you personally. Or do you expect each and every observer to do their own original research from professional papers before they put it in their logbook?

 

Similarly, Andrew Murrell, who is the most competent Australian amateur astronomer that I know personally, did his research on Centaurus A globulars and gave me a photographic chart to work from. Since I trust Andrew Murrell and have observed with him that was good enough for me to put that Cen A globular in my logbook.

 

And it was good enough to mention it in a meaningless post dashed off on Cloudynights.

 

Would I publish that observation in Sky&Telescope without a catalogue number? No.

 

Alan




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