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How Many Globular Star Clusters Have You Seen?

Beginner Binoculars Charts DSO Observing SCT
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#51 SNH

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Posted 01 June 2021 - 02:35 PM

Congrats Scott! What’s the eyepiece you’re using with your Meade 10” SCT to get good views of the clusters? Any recommendation? Thanks!

Michael

I personally like a mid-range magnification if I can get it. Like 120x to 200x with a nice widefield EP. But on those really tough ones, I have to use my ES 11/82 to achieve 263x and to darken the sky as much as possible. I'd say that keeping a wide enough field that you can detect the glow of them is important.

 

Scott



#52 SNH

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Posted 01 June 2021 - 02:39 PM

Hi Timo,

 

I am not a professional astronomer, but for decades I have felt that those professionals who said that a young LMC globular was not a globular simply because it didn't fit their definition that globular clusters had to be ancient were too hung up on their definition.

 

Well, the brand new July, 2021 issue of Sky&Telescope, now online, includes an article by Heidelberg University astrophysicist J.M. Diederik Kruijssen which is a breath of fresh air. It recognizes R136 in the heart of 30 Doradus within the Tarantula Nebula as a brand new LMC globular cluster which would be only a few million years old! I have long thought that it would eventually be recognized as a brand new globular cluster.

 

Globular clusters require extreme environments to form, and those environments were much more common when the universe was young. But that does not mean that those extreme environments do not exist in some places today where there are extreme tidal interactions, such as the merging galaxies NGC 4038/9, the Antennae. They are not counted on my list of globulars, but I suspect that the nine stellarings that are starburst regions in the Antennae that I saw with a 25-inch in Australia, all confirmed from professional images, will be considered infant globular clusters someday as science advances and definitions become less hidebound.

 

I do count my young LMC globulars.

 

Best,

 

Alan Whitman

I got my issue in the mail a few days ago and found that article to be fascinating and very well written! I found it especially interesting since I did so much research into M33's gaggle of young, blue globular clusters. The biggest thing I learned is that the "collapse" theory of how GCs ended up in our Galaxy's halo my be completely wrong. Very interesting theory, indeed!

 

Scott



#53 Redbetter

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Posted 05 June 2021 - 07:37 PM

I went to a different site last night a few miles beyond, harder to get to, that blocks more of the light from the south and west, but also blocks some southern view.  Most importantly, it was smoke free...  Even though the sky was not as dark as it should have been last night, I had better luck on both M55 and M2 naked eye. 

  • There was a gap in the trees where could catch the field around M55 and I was seeing dimmer stars than at my other site.  I was getting glimpses of the 6.8 mag star that forms a right triangle with the nearby 5.5 mag star and M55.   I only had marginal indications of M55 though, still not good enough.  The sky just wasn't dark enough, and I really needed that gap to be positioned where I could see the field an hour earlier when it was still in somewhat darker sky.
  • M2 was certain.  The confusion in other sessions had been with it too low in the sky and trying to see two 6th mag marker stars to the north east simultaneously.  This time I happened to catch it with a tall tree positioned so that it could be used to block those two stars.  This made the identification of M2 certain and allowed me to contrast it with the appearance of the nearer 6.2 mag star.   


#54 Redbetter

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Posted 07 June 2021 - 09:03 AM

I had somewhat better conditions on Sunday night at the higher altitude site after the transparency finally improved after midnight, so I retried M55 again before it had a chance to drift into brighter portions of the southern sky.  I was easily seeing deeper in this area than on previous nights, and had several good locks on fuzzy M55 in addition to the 6.8 mag star that forms a right triangle with M55 and the "bright" 5.5 mag star to the south.   No doubt this time around.  



#55 Sheol

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Posted 07 June 2021 - 06:05 PM

                                  It must be nice to see actual stars. Ok, I swore I would not sit here & bawl about the crappy weather, but well.. This is absurd.. ever since March or earlier, the weather has just kept me indoors. New equipment curse? Am I to bear it for everyone who ever missed it? Mother Nature, how could you? I do not do these things to you! I swear I'll try to be more helpful in the upcoming days!!!

                                  One of those weather patterns like we had in 2007, when it rained from the end of April into the start of July. OK, we have had a drought. I understand we have had a drought. But does it need to fight it out over my town???

 

                               Hopefully I'll see stars & my favorite constellations again... SOON.

 

                        Clear Skies,

                              Matt.



#56 Sheol

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Posted 07 June 2021 - 06:08 PM

                                   Yes,   mid-range magnifications work well on Globs. M.22 looks great under 200X to 260X. Love that GC. One of my favorites, though the southern Hemisphere has so many. LOL

 

                           Clear Skies,

                                 Matt.



#57 Deep13

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Posted 07 June 2021 - 06:10 PM

So many globulars. Sagittarius is glob city.




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