Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What happened to Celestron employees after Synta?

  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 starcruiser

starcruiser

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 94
  • Joined: 04 Jun 2018

Posted 15 May 2021 - 09:00 PM

After Synta acquired Celestron in 2005 (and manufacturing went to China), where did the opticians/technicians go? Did they switched careers altogether and found jobs in other fields?


  • camvan and teashea like this

#2 weis14

weis14

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 554
  • Joined: 26 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Midland, MI

Posted 15 May 2021 - 09:31 PM

At least two Celestron engineers founded their own company, Planewave, in 2006.  Not sure if it was related to the Synta takeover or not. https://planewave.com/about-us/ 


  • camvan and Bowlerhat like this

#3 alphatripleplus

alphatripleplus

    World Controller

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 125,268
  • Joined: 09 Mar 2012
  • Loc: Georgia

Posted 16 May 2021 - 07:12 AM

Yeah, Planewave is a flourishing maker of high end mounts. I believe that Celestron and Planewave jointly developed Celestron PlaneWave Instruments (CPWI) Telescope Control Software that can be used with Celestron telescopes as a pointing model. So there would appear to be some joint effort there.



#4 WadeH237

WadeH237

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 7,612
  • Joined: 24 Feb 2007
  • Loc: Ellensburg, WA

Posted 16 May 2021 - 07:38 AM

The way that I remember it, is that Celestron was developing a 20" CDK.  For whatever reason, they didn't see it through to a shipping product.

 

At some point along the way, a few folks left Celestron and founded Planewave to complete and market the 20" CDK.  I don't know why Celestron didn't produce it.

 

Also, as I remember, this all happened years before Synta bought Celestron, so I don't think that the two events are related.



#5 carolinaskies

carolinaskies

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,974
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2014
  • Loc: Greenville SC

Posted 16 May 2021 - 01:05 PM

After Synta acquired Celestron in 2005 (and manufacturing went to China), where did the opticians/technicians go? Did they switched careers altogether and found jobs in other fields?

First, there is some misconception that both Celestron and Meade suddenly divested of all their personnel when they got sold off.  That's not the case.  It would be a poor business decision to buy either leading telescope maker and lose all the knowledge and skill they were paying to acquire. 

Rather some personnel retired, some left, but others simply stayed working.  Both companies have facilities for building their SCTs and high end mounts.  When you ship off a telescope or mount for work it isn't being shipped off to China but rather to people who've been doing these jobs for years for Celestron and Meade. 

  


  • Bean614, starcruiser and teashea like this

#6 starbuckin

starbuckin

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 389
  • Joined: 03 Mar 2019
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 16 May 2021 - 05:40 PM

The RASA is kind of a joint project of Celestron and Planewave.

Rowe is one of the founders of Planewave (I believe previously worked for Celestron), Ackerman was Celestron consultant. (I.e. Rowe, Ackerman, Schmidt Astrograph).

Edited by starbuckin, 16 May 2021 - 06:20 PM.

  • weis14 likes this

#7 Old Speckled Hen

Old Speckled Hen

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 597
  • Joined: 18 May 2020
  • Loc: 56.4451° N, 3.1670° W

Posted 17 May 2021 - 09:22 AM

Some wrote books too. wink.gif

 

 
 
725949-1.jpg

 

Added Unc Rod's foreword to the Testing and Evaluating the Optics of Schmitt-Cassegrain telescopes book

 

Foreword, by “Uncle” Rod Mollise

 

"Funny thing about commercial SCTs: They’ve been around for well over forty years, but very little has been written about them. There have been (usually brief) reviews of new models in Sky and Telescope  and  Astronomy,  but that has been about it.

 

Books and magazine articles concerning Schmidt-Cassegrain technology have been few and far between.

 

That’s one of the things that  impelled me to write my  first SCT book,  Choosing and Using a Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope  in 2000.

 

Don’t ask me  why there’s been this dearth of info about our favorite scopes;  they are without a doubt the most popular commercial telescopes ever sold. Yeah, I’m  enthusiastic about Schmidt Cassegrains, I positively crow about ‘em  to anyone who will listen; that’s why I’ve become known as “Mr. SCT.” I certainly don’t dislike that title, but I’m not sure how accurate it is.

 

Yeah, I continue to write books and magazine pieces about these CATs, but they tend to be general interest reader/beginner oriented and don’t get down to the real technical nitty-gritty of how SCTs do their thing.

 

If you’re interested in that, let me introduce you to the  real  Mr. SCT, Robert Piekiel.

 

Like most amateur astronomy old-timers, I was well aware Celestron produced some beautiful and expensive Schmidt Cassegrains in the 1960s, the vaunted “White and Blue” C6es, C8s, C10s, C12s, C16s, and C22s.

 

Beyond that’ I didn’t know pea-turkey about them. That Changed when I  stumbled across Bob Piekiel’s e-book  Celestron the Early Years.

 

Pursuing and re-pursuing its virtual pages taught me  not just more about the early Celestrons, but all Celestrons, and, indeed all SCTs than I’d  ever thought I’d learn.

 

And here Bob is with  another one. If you’re like me, you are interested in  knowing the ins-and-outs of SCT optics. What makes ‘em good, what makes ‘em bad, how to tell.

But if you are indeed like Uncle Rod, your eyes tend to glaze-over at pictures of Ronchi-grams and star tests and the usual droning prose that accompanies ‘em. 

Man, are you in for a treat. Bob Piekiel has that rare gift of making the most difficult technical  subjects easy to understand and enjoyable to read, and he does that in spades here.

The  book that follows is quite a trip and quite a treat.

 

Enjoy! Rod Mollise"


Edited by Andrew Brown, 17 May 2021 - 02:40 PM.

  • Illinois, rmollise, bortle2 and 3 others like this

#8 rmollise

rmollise

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 23,512
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2007
  • Loc: US

Posted 19 May 2021 - 04:26 PM

Some wrote books too. wink.gif

 

 
 
725949-1.jpg

 

Added Unc Rod's foreword to the Testing and Evaluating the Optics of Schmitt-Cassegrain telescopes book

 

Foreword, by “Uncle” Rod Mollise

 

"Funny thing about commercial SCTs: They’ve been around for well over forty years, but very little has been written about them. There have been (usually brief) reviews of new models in Sky and Telescope  and  Astronomy,  but that has been about it.

 

Books and magazine articles concerning Schmidt-Cassegrain technology have been few and far between.

 

That’s one of the things that  impelled me to write my  first SCT book,  Choosing and Using a Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope  in 2000.

 

Don’t ask me  why there’s been this dearth of info about our favorite scopes;  they are without a doubt the most popular commercial telescopes ever sold. Yeah, I’m  enthusiastic about Schmidt Cassegrains, I positively crow about ‘em  to anyone who will listen; that’s why I’ve become known as “Mr. SCT.” I certainly don’t dislike that title, but I’m not sure how accurate it is.

 

Yeah, I continue to write books and magazine pieces about these CATs, but they tend to be general interest reader/beginner oriented and don’t get down to the real technical nitty-gritty of how SCTs do their thing.

 

If you’re interested in that, let me introduce you to the  real  Mr. SCT, Robert Piekiel.

 

Like most amateur astronomy old-timers, I was well aware Celestron produced some beautiful and expensive Schmidt Cassegrains in the 1960s, the vaunted “White and Blue” C6es, C8s, C10s, C12s, C16s, and C22s.

 

Beyond that’ I didn’t know pea-turkey about them. That Changed when I  stumbled across Bob Piekiel’s e-book  Celestron the Early Years.

 

Pursuing and re-pursuing its virtual pages taught me  not just more about the early Celestrons, but all Celestrons, and, indeed all SCTs than I’d  ever thought I’d learn.

 

And here Bob is with  another one. If you’re like me, you are interested in  knowing the ins-and-outs of SCT optics. What makes ‘em good, what makes ‘em bad, how to tell.

But if you are indeed like Uncle Rod, your eyes tend to glaze-over at pictures of Ronchi-grams and star tests and the usual droning prose that accompanies ‘em. 

Man, are you in for a treat. Bob Piekiel has that rare gift of making the most difficult technical  subjects easy to understand and enjoyable to read, and he does that in spades here.

The  book that follows is quite a trip and quite a treat.

 

Enjoy! Rod Mollise"

 

I don't know if Bob is still selling it...haven't spoken to old Barefoot B. in many a Moon, but anybody with an interest in SCTs should try to get Celestron:  The Early Years if at all possible. Not only is it a great (e)book to browse...there is history in there that hasn't been written down or preserved elsewhere. gramps.gif


  • Cyrano, Jon Isaacs, Neptune and 3 others like this

#9 Old Speckled Hen

Old Speckled Hen

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 597
  • Joined: 18 May 2020
  • Loc: 56.4451° N, 3.1670° W

Posted 19 May 2021 - 05:43 PM

Rod, I have "the early years" on CD! What a story! I doubt we will ever see the likes again.

 

I FB'd Robert about his books a couple of month ago.

 

Robert now sells his books direct as E books at present.

 

FB:-  https://www.facebook.../robert.piekiel

 

E mail:-  piekielrl@netzero.com

 

However, there is a seller of print material that had stock of some books last month ..

 

http://www.cnyo.org/...robert-piekiel/

 

 

His books aren't a "SCT's for dummies" type but rather you have to assimilate the information yourself; quite refreshing in these times and the best way to learn IMO.

 

I have to add I receive nothing for/from this.

 

I just like people getting good information and helping an old ex optical engineer get a few extra bucks in retirement if I'm honest; hey it's nice to be nice!

 

 

 

Rod, all the best to you and Miss D.

 

PS I get my copy of your latest 

 

https://www.amazon.c..._27:Rod Mollise

 

this Friday, looking forwards to a good read.

 

AB



#10 wd4dx

wd4dx

    Lift Off

  • *****
  • Posts: 3
  • Joined: 22 Jun 2015
  • Loc: Atlanta, GA

Posted 19 May 2021 - 09:15 PM

I don't know if Bob is still selling it...haven't spoken to old Barefoot B. in many a Moon, but anybody with an interest in SCTs should try to get Celestron:  The Early Years if at all possible. Not only is it a great (e)book to browse...there is history in there that hasn't been written down or preserved elsewhere. gramps.gif

I can confirm that he is still selling them. I just acquired his entire set less than a week ago!


  • rmollise and Old Speckled Hen like this

#11 Sathya

Sathya

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009

Posted 23 July 2021 - 08:10 PM

I would love to get a set, but I did not notice the price of his ebooks anywhere. I only noticed the print ones are around $12 each.  Could someone here let me know how much do they cost please?



#12 rmollise

rmollise

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 23,512
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2007
  • Loc: US

Posted 24 July 2021 - 01:29 PM

Rod, I have "the early years" on CD! What a story! I doubt we will ever see the likes again.

 

I FB'd Robert about his books a couple of month ago.

 

Robert now sells his books direct as E books at present.

 

FB:-  https://www.facebook.../robert.piekiel

 

E mail:-  piekielrl@netzero.com

 

However, there is a seller of print material that had stock of some books last month ..

 

http://www.cnyo.org/...robert-piekiel/

 

 

His books aren't a "SCT's for dummies" type but rather you have to assimilate the information yourself; quite refreshing in these times and the best way to learn IMO.

 

I have to add I receive nothing for/from this.

 

I just like people getting good information and helping an old ex optical engineer get a few extra bucks in retirement if I'm honest; hey it's nice to be nice!

 

 

 

Rod, all the best to you and Miss D.

 

PS I get my copy of your latest 

 

https://www.amazon.c..._27:Rod Mollise

 

this Friday, looking forwards to a good read.

 

AB

 

 

Thanks! For the kind words and also the report on Barefoot Bob!

 

Miss Dorothy and I are doing well out here in suburbia. Hard as it is for me to believe, the vaunted Chaos Manor South (see below post one hurricane or another) is but a memory. We've been gone these (gulp) SEVEN years. 

 

I am semi-retired, but still teach my astronomy classes for the physics department here once a week. And I still contribute to Sky & Telescope purty often.  Glad the new SCT book got on the streets before the pandemic craziness hit!

 

Oh, a few have axed about my old, old newsletter Skywatch. The archive of issues (going back to 1995, I believe) is here:  https://skywatch.bra...er/skywatch.htm

 

Best to all my muchachos, and I actually have a schedule planned for the Astroblog and will get right on that with some new articles assuming we ever get some clear nights down here on the Gulf Coast.

 

chaos_manor_south.jpg


Edited by rmollise, 24 July 2021 - 01:30 PM.

  • Jon Isaacs, Illinois, deepwoods1 and 5 others like this

#13 Old Speckled Hen

Old Speckled Hen

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 597
  • Joined: 18 May 2020
  • Loc: 56.4451° N, 3.1670° W

Posted 25 July 2021 - 05:03 PM

I would love to get a set, but I did not notice the price of his ebooks anywhere. I only noticed the print ones are around $12 each.  Could someone here let me know how much do they cost please?

Last I heard was $13 for the E-books.


  • Sathya likes this

#14 Sathya

Sathya

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2009

Posted 26 July 2021 - 07:52 AM

Last I heard was $13 for the E-books.

13$ each!!! ok. 



#15 teashea

teashea

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,764
  • Joined: 20 Dec 2020
  • Loc: Lincoln, Nebraska, USA

Posted 26 July 2021 - 07:02 PM

Thanks! For the kind words and also the report on Barefoot Bob!

 

Miss Dorothy and I are doing well out here in suburbia. Hard as it is for me to believe, the vaunted Chaos Manor South (see below post one hurricane or another) is but a memory. We've been gone these (gulp) SEVEN years. 

 

I am semi-retired, but still teach my astronomy classes for the physics department here once a week. And I still contribute to Sky & Telescope purty often.  Glad the new SCT book got on the streets before the pandemic craziness hit!

 

Oh, a few have axed about my old, old newsletter Skywatch. The archive of issues (going back to 1995, I believe) is here:  https://skywatch.bra...er/skywatch.htm

 

Best to all my muchachos, and I actually have a schedule planned for the Astroblog and will get right on that with some new articles assuming we ever get some clear nights down here on the Gulf Coast.

 

attachicon.gifchaos_manor_south.jpg

chaos manor ------- wow and wow



#16 davelpg

davelpg

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 114
  • Joined: 15 Jul 2014
  • Loc: Chicagoland

Posted 27 July 2021 - 11:21 AM

Chaos Manor brought back a Byte magazine (gone a long time ago) guy named Jerry Pournelle memory. His column was always a fun read. Jerry sadly is gone too.


Edited by davelpg, 27 July 2021 - 11:23 AM.


#17 rmollise

rmollise

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 23,512
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2007
  • Loc: US

Posted 27 July 2021 - 12:14 PM

Chaos Manor brought back a Byte magazine (gone a long time ago) guy named Jerry Pournelle memory. His column was always a fun read. Jerry sadly is gone too.

Yep, good, old Jerry's Chaos Manor (the second one; the first belonged to jazz photographer Eugene Smith) is gone too. :(


  • davelpg likes this

#18 teashea

teashea

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,764
  • Joined: 20 Dec 2020
  • Loc: Lincoln, Nebraska, USA

Posted 27 July 2021 - 08:06 PM

Chaos Manor brought back a Byte magazine (gone a long time ago) guy named Jerry Pournelle memory. His column was always a fun read. Jerry sadly is gone too.

I used to love to read his adventures dealing with all of his computer issues ---- they were so much fun to follow.  



#19 Old Speckled Hen

Old Speckled Hen

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 597
  • Joined: 18 May 2020
  • Loc: 56.4451° N, 3.1670° W

Posted 28 July 2021 - 11:01 AM

frown.gif  Those names rang a bell or two there..happier, no better, times indeed.shakecane.gif

 

https://www.theverge...puters-obituary




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics