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M106 in bortle 9 (Beginner attempt)

Astrophotography Beginner DSO
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#1 Brandon0616

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Posted 16 May 2021 - 01:11 PM

So I have recently started to gather exposure on M106 and so far have 1 hour and 10 minutes of data (2 nights stacked). The challenge with my imaging is that I am shooting from Bortle 9 skies with no filters, just broadband unmodded canon t2i. This is my setup: Star adventurer, canont2i, at60ed, and benro tma28a tripod. I used 30 second subs and did not do much manual dithering the first night, but did dither the second night. I processed my image in Siril. If anyone wants to give my data a try here is the TIFF:  advice is welcome!

 

M106 2 JPEG

Edited by Brandon0616, 16 May 2021 - 01:30 PM.

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#2 Brandon0616

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Posted 16 May 2021 - 01:31 PM

TIFF:https://drive.google...iew?usp=sharing



#3 Islander13

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Posted 16 May 2021 - 01:50 PM

Hey Brandon. That's definitely a decent start especially considering what you're shooting, what you're shooting with, and where you're shooting from... waytogo.gif

 

Have you tried pushing it 60 second subs?



#4 Brandon0616

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Posted 16 May 2021 - 01:56 PM

Hey Brandon. That's definitely a decent start especially considering what you're shooting, what you're shooting with, and where you're shooting from... waytogo.gif

 

Have you tried pushing it 60 second subs?

Not yet, but I will try to do that since I found out why my star adventuer was no tracking well (Vibrations from me walking around it lol). Do you know if I could stack say a night of 45 second subs on a night of 30 seconds subs? (Unfortunately 60 seconds starts to blow out the image even at ISO 400). I am aiming for about 4 hours on this target at the end.


Edited by Brandon0616, 16 May 2021 - 01:56 PM.

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#5 Jim Waters

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Posted 16 May 2021 - 02:31 PM

Real nice start Brandon.  Impressive for a Bortle 9 site.


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#6 jonnybravo0311

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Posted 16 May 2021 - 03:02 PM

Great effort! If you have a reducer/flattener on that scope, you need more spacers between it and the camera's sensor. If you don't, maybe consider the flattener as a future purchase since the stars get to be quite distorted as you move away from the center. Also, I wouldn't bother trying to push 60" subs. Work on getting your polar alignment spot on. You've got definitive star elongation. Canon cameras typically find their sweet spot at higher ISO (minimum 800). Also, as a potential next purchase, perhaps a guide cam and scope. Yes, this will tether you to a laptop or some other computer, but it will allow you to get much rounder stars as guiding will help to correct the errors in the tracker.

 

Finally, to answer your other question, yes, you can stack different exposure times from different nights. Just make sure you calibrate each night independently with its own calibration frames (darks, flats, biases/darkFlats).


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#7 Desertanimal

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Posted 16 May 2021 - 04:12 PM

Great shot! I found that target to be particularly difficult. You did an excellent job from such bright skies.
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#8 Brandon0616

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Posted 16 May 2021 - 09:07 PM

Great effort! If you have a reducer/flattener on that scope, you need more spacers between it and the camera's sensor. If you don't, maybe consider the flattener as a future purchase since the stars get to be quite distorted as you move away from the center. Also, I wouldn't bother trying to push 60" subs. Work on getting your polar alignment spot on. You've got definitive star elongation. Canon cameras typically find their sweet spot at higher ISO (minimum 800). Also, as a potential next purchase, perhaps a guide cam and scope. Yes, this will tether you to a laptop or some other computer, but it will allow you to get much rounder stars as guiding will help to correct the errors in the tracker.

 

Finally, to answer your other question, yes, you can stack different exposure times from different nights. Just make sure you calibrate each night independently with its own calibration frames (darks, flats, biases/darkFlats).

Thanks! And I don't have a flattener on the scope at the moment, but it definitely something I plan to get soon along with guiding. I already use a laptop to shoot (and plate solve)  so that won't be an issue. 


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