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Mono-binning? Just heard about this. How is it done?

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#1 George P Dunham

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Posted 18 May 2021 - 06:24 PM

I just heard about a type of binning for OSC cameras called mono-binning.  he color camera will ignore the information of the Bayer matrix and select the closest pixel value to merge and get a grayscale image.  It sounds like it would be useful for doing NB imaging with a OSC camera.  I have not seen any software options for doing it.  I am wondering if anyone knows what software one needs to do it.



#2 Xplode

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Posted 18 May 2021 - 06:55 PM

If you are refering to "mono bin" mentioned by ZWO it's really just creating a superpixel from for example a 2x2 RGGB matrix, it's not really of any real world use as far as i know (it increases SNR, but looses half the resolution and color)
You're pretty much doing the same thing by creating an RGB image, downscaling by 2, but you actually keep the color this way.


Edited by Xplode, 18 May 2021 - 06:56 PM.


#3 gregbradley

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Posted 18 May 2021 - 07:00 PM

I just heard about a type of binning for OSC cameras called mono-binning.  he color camera will ignore the information of the Bayer matrix and select the closest pixel value to merge and get a grayscale image.  It sounds like it would be useful for doing NB imaging with a OSC camera.  I have not seen any software options for doing it.  I am wondering if anyone knows what software one needs to do it.

It might be very useful for narrowband imaging.

 

Greg.



#4 Xplode

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Posted 18 May 2021 - 07:04 PM

It might be very useful for narrowband imaging.

 

Greg.

It's pointless for narrowband imaging because a green filter still won't pass red (Ha) light.
Actually it will just create lower SNR since 3x mostly noisy pixels would be stacked with 1 R pixel for Ha.

For NB with OSC it's best to discard the information from the unused pixels, if you take H you want to discard the G and B pixels because they will just add noise.


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#5 Jon Rista

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Posted 18 May 2021 - 07:54 PM

It's pointless for narrowband imaging because a green filter still won't pass red (Ha) light.
Actually it will just create lower SNR since 3x mostly noisy pixels would be stacked with 1 R pixel for Ha.

For NB with OSC it's best to discard the information from the unused pixels, if you take H you want to discard the G and B pixels because they will just add noise.

And it is actually pretty easy to demonstrate the loss in SNR as well. This question comes up again and again...I did this test with data someone shared with me years ago, asking how to get the best NB results from OSC:

 

jFq0cRF.gif

 

Combining channels that have little to no on-band signal just increases noise, which reduces SNR. 


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