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Observation log continued; III

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#1 csa/montana

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Posted 23 May 2021 - 09:27 AM

Please continue to post your observations here! smile.gif


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#2 MikeHC8

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Posted 23 May 2021 - 06:52 PM

Just came after about 3 hours of solar observation.  I have not done this in a very long time.  I did daytime level and align with little problems.   I used 32, 26 and 21 mm for almost the entire time.  I was tracking the sun spot which I think is AR2824.  It look like a key hole to me, with gray matter going around it.  I could see small spots to the east and west of large spot using earth for my guide.  The spot to the west look like 2 but I was dealing with wind and the air would only steady for few seconds.  This appeared to move as time went on and had higher position at the beginning of my observation, the east side seem to be going north.  I did not see any other spots but was confused by a spot in the middle of my eyepieces.  Then I realized it was secondary mirror, I guess that why you do not use full solar filter on CST?  I did listen to Skysafari description of the Sun or Apollo or Ra, just like the stories a lot.  It was quiet, lots of bird activities and just fun with the scope.  


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#3 desertstars

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Posted 23 May 2021 - 08:21 PM

Just came after about 3 hours of solar observation.  I have not done this in a very long time.  I did daytime level and align with little problems.   I used 32, 26 and 21 mm for almost the entire time.  I was tracking the sun spot which I think is AR2824.  It look like a key hole to me, with gray matter going around it.  I could see small spots to the east and west of large spot using earth for my guide.  The spot to the west look like 2 but I was dealing with wind and the air would only steady for few seconds.  This appeared to move as time went on and had higher position at the beginning of my observation, the east side seem to be going north.  I did not see any other spots but was confused by a spot in the middle of my eyepieces.  Then I realized it was secondary mirror, I guess that why you do not use full solar filter on CST?  I did listen to Skysafari description of the Sun or Apollo or Ra, just like the stories a lot.  It was quiet, lots of bird activities and just fun with the scope.  

I was all set to do some white light solar observing this morning, when I noticed the mylar film on the filter was compromised. Need to buy more film and rebuild the filter, first. gaah.gif


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#4 BFaucett

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Posted 23 May 2021 - 09:25 PM

This thread's history for reference:
 
(1)  started 13 July 2015

A Newbie's Early Observation Log - Join me!
https://www.cloudyni...on-log-join-me/

 
(2)  started 17 August 2019

Observation Log - Join Us!
https://www.cloudyni...on-log-join-us/

 
(3)  started 06 June 2020

Observation Log continued: Join Us.
https://www.cloudyni...tinued-join-us/

 
(4)  started 23 May 2021   (this thread)

Observation log continued; III
https://www.cloudyni...-continued-iii/

 
Cheers! Bob F.


Edited by BFaucett, 24 May 2021 - 11:43 AM.

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#5 aeajr

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Posted 23 May 2021 - 09:33 PM

Was planning to go with my new scope tonight.  Earlier in the evening it was cloudy but it was broken and I thought  might be able to get out later, but no luck.   Clouds go thicker, so I came, which is what we do on Cloudy Nights.


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#6 chrysalis

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 03:43 AM

I seem to be discovering that it is sunny here in New Port Richey FL every day, with an n of 7. Small data set in relation to 365.2422 days per year, but still very different from other places I've lived.

 

Watched the sun set behind houses across the street last night and Venus and Mercury come out.

 

If I have the energy I'll be back at Green Key Beach tonight for the sunset :) !!


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#7 Studly

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 08:04 AM

Well, I was unable to Like any of the recent posts on the old thread since it is now locked. Rest assured, I found them all very good! I'm very glad to see that others are getting out to enjoy the Moon.

 

Someone mentioned Luna Cognita. I have this three-book volume. It is *extremely* comprehensive, and gives a day-by-day tour of the terminator regions and what to look out for. It is a great reference for anyone looking for that level of detail. It may not be a good choice for those with only a passing interest, though.

 

Like others, I was able to get out Saturday night for a lunar observing session with my LX85 ACF. I am fighting an emerging case of bronchitis, so this report may not be up to my usual standards....

 

2021-05-22
Time: 22:35 local time (EDT); 02:35 UTC (05-23)
Cloud Cover: Approximately 5% and hazy
Wind: Light and Variable
SQM Measurement: 18.74
Temperature: 19C/66F
Transparency: Fair (2/5)
Seeing: Fair (2/5)
Length of Observing Session: 1h 45m
Instrument: Meade LX85 8-inch ACF (fl2032, f/10)
Mount: Meade LX85 German Equatorial Go-To
Eyepieces: Explore Scientific and Meade PWA/UWA

 

Summary: The skies were predicted to be clear, but there were still a small number of wispy clouds in the area. Also, there seemed to be a gossamer haze in the sky at times, which the brightness of the Moon made visible. Despite this, I decided to employ the 8-inch ACF to do some lunar viewing. I had no obligations for work the next day, but I had been struggling with a head cold and emerging bronchitis, so I wasn’t sure how long I would be able to stay out.

 

Moon (Waxing Gibbous): At approximately 11 days old, the Moon stood at approximately 75% illuminated. Pursuant to my usual tactic, I would first survey the lunar features near the terminator, then double back for a closer look at a specific feature that captured my attention. At 40mm (50x), several features near the northern polar region were evident. The large crater J. Herschel immediately captured my attention. The large crater showed its outline clearly. Its floor appeared somewhat rough or uneven. The satellite crater Horrebow was clearly visible on J. Herschel’s southern perimeter. Inside J. Herschel, the small crater J. Herschel-C could just barely be made out. A short distance to the north of this area, two other craters stood out remarkably well—Philolaus and Anaximenes. Both of these craters showed profound black shadows in their interiors, but Philolaus displayed a beautifully illuminated interior western crater rim. Continuing south along the terminator, a crater inside Mare Frigoris peeked out of the dark Mare floor—Harpalus. The obviously raised rim of the crater cast a distinct shadow onto the Mare floor in the direction of the terminator—very cool. This rim had a crisp, sharp appearance and was very well resolved. Southwest of Harpalus, crater Foucault was also notable, mainly due to a raised ridge adjacent to it. This small elevated area cast its own small shadow. South of these features, and lying nestled in the peaks of Montes Jura, stood the crater Sharp. The crater displayed a deep, dark recess in the surface—a nice contrast to the surrounding well-lit mountains. Continuing southwest of Sharp, Mairan next captured my attention. The raised rim of this crater cast a notable shadow westward. This shadow fell on the uneven surrounding terrain, making it appear jagged as a result. Continuing south along the terminator brought me to Aristarchus. The crater’s western rim lay right along the line separating darkness from light. The crater’s raised rim shone bright white. None of its interior was visible, remaining shrouded in darkness. Nearby to the east, the broken/flooded crater Prinz was noted peeking up out of the darker floor of Mare Imbrium. Only about half of the old crater’s rim was visible, the rest submerged in the Mare floor. To the southeast, and a farther into the sunlit side, the crater Kepler was quite obvious, as was larger Copernicus farther to the east. Kepler’s bright ejecta rays stood out remarkably well, stretching far across the lunar landscape. The area around the crater appeared speckled with numerous smaller craters, each dark dot providing an appealing contrast to the bright ejecta material. Continuing south along the terminator line brought me to the vicinity of Gassendi. The large feature stood a short distance from the terminator, but its floor was well lit, and appeared reflective to my eye (as usual). This view always reminds me of a shiny vinyl album, complete with grooves for the record player arm to ride within. Gassendi’s compound central peaks could also be readily seen. Across Mare Humorum to the south, another broken/flooded feature stood out—Doppelmayer. The northern rim appeared flooded, and an elevated central feature could be made out, with its own small but obvious shadow. West from there brought me to Palmieri. The feature stood right on the terminator line like a teardrop-shaped ink blot. South of Mare Humorum, Lacus Excellentiae caught my attention. The Lacus was dotted with numerous craters which stood out prominently—mostly those of Clausius and its satellite craters. A small peak was visible in the eastern portion of the Lacus, its crisp, dark shadow falling onto the Lacus floor—very neat. Continuing the survey southward along the terminator, the irregularly shaped crater Schiller was quite obvious. The oblong feature stood a short distance from the terminator line, but its floor was well lit. (This one always reminds me of a large, misshapen footprint!) South of Schiller, three good-sized craters were visible. The low angle of the light made identification difficult, but I believe these were Zucchius, Bettinus, and Kircher. All three displayed pitch black interior regions.

 

Aristarchus: Having completed a survey along the terminator, I decided to return to Aristarchus to see if additional details could be had at higher magnification. At 28mm (72x), the crater’s outer rim appeared compound in nature, with parallel outside ridges along its eastern side. The satellite crater Aristarchus-F became plainly visible to the south. The rough terrain to the parent crater’s north and west appeared quite detailed. At 20mm (101x), Aristarchus’ exterior rim revealed tiny relief features, appearing like small veins stretching outward from the crater. The interior crater rim still shone brightly. The rough terrain north and west of the crater became more complex in the view. At 14mm (145x), the complex nature of the crater’s exterior rim was confirmed. The interior western rim also showed hints of additional detail, but these were unclear. The view of the shadows in the rough terrain outside the crater was greatly enhanced, showing small, jagged lines falling on uneven terrain. Awesome view. At 8.8mm (230x), the crater’s exterior eastern rim revealed a terrace outside the peak of the rim, which explained the double-rim impression seen earlier. The limitations of the bad Seeing were beginning to assert themselves, causing the image to shift in and out of focus frequently. At 5.5mm (369x), the image was beginning to dim, and some of the finer detail that was visible earlier disappeared. Despite this, the crater’s interior western rim showed some fine relief features not seen earlier. At 4mm (508x), the image degraded as expected. Still, the view was better than I anticipated, with the crater still quite visible despite the significant dimming and blurring of the image.

 

Conclusion: My fight against fatigue and illness prevented any further investigations. (Actually, I was surprised I lasted as long as I did.) I had hoped to glean more detail from Aristarchus, but a combination of factors prevented this, including its very close proximity to the line of the terminator (which prevented seeing any part of the crater’s floor) and my own illness causing a lack of clearer perception. I had the distinct impression throughout the session that I did not record as much detail as usual.

Until next time!


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#8 LDW47

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 08:40 AM

I was all set to do some white light solar observing this morning, when I noticed the mylar film on the filter was compromised. Need to buy more film and rebuild the filter, first. gaah.gif

What do you mean by compromised ?


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#9 csa/montana

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 09:09 AM

It means the film may no longer be safe to view the sun thru.  Could be cracks, etc.  One cannot be too careful with their eyes!


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#10 LDW47

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 09:42 AM

It means the film may no longer be safe to view the sun thru.  Could be cracks, etc.  One cannot be too careful with their eyes!

The only reason I asked is that Baader, the developers / makers, the industry leaders in the film don’t consider pin holes or folds in the film to be a problem, enough to replace it. There is no use throwing the film out unless one is too nervous to use it which is my point but to each his own. Maybe other solar viewers can use that info ?


Edited by LDW47, 24 May 2021 - 09:44 AM.

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#11 NYJohn S

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 10:39 AM

I was out last night 5-23-21 at 10:00pm with the AT102ED. The conditions were poor to say the least. The Moon was in and out of the clouds and the seeing was poor as well. Even at 130x the Moon was swimming, about half of the magnification I had been using previous nights.

 

My motivation was to try for the Moon Maiden. For some reason I was thinking about an old post but couldn't find it. BFaucett was nice enough to find some info on it and then eventually located the post - https://www.cloudyni...n-us/?p=9699449

 

It looks like Brent posted about seeing it and now almost 2 years later I decided to look for it. Long story short I was at least a day too late. At least now I know the exact location. It was just too far from the terminator to have the shadows that would make it appear. I could see where it was but between the flat lighting and the poor seeing the detail wasn't there as I had hoped. 

 

Here's an image of the area. Its locate at the end of Sinus Iridum by Promontorium Heraclides. I did get a good look at Schroter's Valley which is always interesting. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Moon 05_23_21 1500px med-9160.jpg

Edited by NYJohn S, 24 May 2021 - 11:46 AM.

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#12 NYJohn S

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 10:42 AM

This is a second image of the lower half. Does anyone know what the broken horseshoe feature is called. I couldn't find it on any of the maps or apps I have.

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Moon 05_23_21 1500px med ?-9158.jpg

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#13 desertstars

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 11:16 AM

 

It means the film may no longer be safe to view the sun thru.  Could be cracks, etc.  One cannot be too careful with their eyes!

The only reason I asked is that Baader, the developers / makers, the industry leaders in the film don’t consider pin holes or folds in the film to be a problem, enough to replace it. There is no use throwing the film out unless one is too nervous to use it which is my point but to each his own. Maybe other solar viewers can use that info ?

I check the filter I have (not a commercially made filter - DIY)  before every use, simply by holding it up and looking at the sun through it. If I have to squint because the sunlight coming is too bright, it's obviously not safe to use. That's the effect I saw the other day. In this case, I apparently mishandled it after the most recent observation, abrading the film in a spot the size of a pencil eraser. When I have a chance I'll replace the film. The cell I built was meant to be disassembled for such a need.


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#14 BFaucett

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 11:20 AM

Hey, John!
 
The link you posted was truncated. Here's the link: https://www.cloudyni...21#entry9699449
 
Nice report and photos. waytogo.gif  Shame you missed the Maiden. It was solid overcast here last night so I couldn't try for it.
 

 
 doncellalunardibujo.jpg

"In 1679, Giovanni Cassini, was tasked, by King Louis XIV of France, to make a lunar map. In the area corresponding to Promontorium Heraclides, the engraver drew a woman’s head, we do not know if motu proprio or commissioned by Cassini himself."

 

Pic and caption from: Sinus Iridum and the Moon Maiden

http://www.bitacorad...he-moon-maiden/

 

Also see: 'Carte de la lune' by Cassini

https://www.uu.nl/en...lune-by-cassini

 

Cheers! Bob F. smile.gif


Edited by BFaucett, 24 May 2021 - 11:55 AM.

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#15 NYJohn S

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 11:43 AM

Hey, John!
 
The link you posted was truncated. Here's the link: https://www.cloudyni...21#entry9699449
 
Nice report and photos. waytogo.gif  Shame you missed the Maiden. It was solid overcast here last night so I couldn't try for it.
 
~Snip~

 

 

Cheers! Bob F. smile.gif

Thanks Bob! I didn't catch that with the link. Looks like we'll have to wait until next month to try for this again.

 

John


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#16 LDW47

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 11:48 AM

I check the filter I have (not a commercially made filter - DIY)  before every use, simply by holding it up and looking at the sun through it. If I have to squint because the sunlight coming is too bright, it's obviously not safe to use. That's the effect I saw the other day. In this case, I apparently mishandled it after the most recent observation, abrading the film in a spot the size of a pencil eraser. When I have a chance I'll replace the film. The cell I built was meant to be disassembled for such a need.

Also quite often I use either a variable polarizing filter or a #56 or 58 green filter to tone down the brightness, maybe you already do, as do many others !


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#17 Studly

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 05:02 PM

This is a second image of the lower half. Does anyone know what the broken horseshoe feature is called. I couldn't find it on any of the maps or apps I have.

John,

 If I am reading the Rukl atlas correctly, it looks like Sirsalis-E. The parent crater would be smaller and to the southwest (lunar directions), probably still hiding in the darkness. But, it *is* labeled.

 Can anyone give me a confirmation on this?

 

Tony


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#18 NYJohn S

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 06:58 PM

John,

 If I am reading the Rukl atlas correctly, it looks like Sirsalis-E. The parent crater would be smaller and to the southwest (lunar directions), probably still hiding in the darkness. But, it *is* labeled.

 Can anyone give me a confirmation on this?

 

Tony

Thanks Tony! Once you gave me the name I located this image - https://commons.wiki...raters_map.jpg 

 

I'm going to have order a copy of Rukl. 

 

John


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#19 MikeHC8

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 09:39 PM

I used thousand oaks filter, not glass.  I plan to make a cardboard cut-out to stop down the CST and see what this does.  It was great just viewing in a chair, with a hat that cut down the glare.  Next time hope with more steady air.  I am sure this is not the right way but I held the filter in front of my eyes and look at the sun to see if the film was Okay.


Edited by MikeHC8, 24 May 2021 - 09:41 PM.

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#20 csa/montana

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Posted 24 May 2021 - 10:13 PM

The only reason I asked is that Baader, the developers / makers, the industry leaders in the film don’t consider pin holes or folds in the film to be a problem, enough to replace it. There is no use throwing the film out unless one is too nervous to use it which is my point but to each his own. Maybe other solar viewers can use that info ?

FWIW; I would never take a chance on my eye sight, if there was even a slight doubt about the film.


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#21 brentknight

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 01:28 AM

A couple Android shots of Luna tonight with the AT72EDII, 8mm Ethos and GSO ND filter.

Almost Full - 01.jpg

Tycho - 01.jpg

I just took the plunge (inspired by Allen, aka ETXer) and ordered my first camera. It's an ASI 224MC and it might get here by the weekend. I plan to try using it for the planets and Moon with the Super C8 Plus. I plan to be quite embarrassed by my efforts for some time thereafter, but will get better hopefully.

Edited by brentknight, 25 May 2021 - 01:52 AM.

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#22 chrysalis

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 03:30 AM

Last night I went for my final attempt at sunset on Green Key Beach in FL. The waxing gibbous Moon also made a great target, and I was able to grab a sunset panorama that also included it. What is amazing is that in the original I can zoom in on the moon with fairly decent detail. Later, I captured the moon with some faint anticrepuscular rays.

 

Have a look!

 

#1 - the panorama - the Moon is to the right of the last palm tree on the left of the image. A shame it doesn't go into the post at the enlargeable size!

5-24-21 SUNSET PANORAMA 759 PM EDT IMG-5632 5000.JPG

 

The Moon from the pan:

5-24-21 SUNSET PANORAMA 759 PM EDT IMG-5632 MOON.JPG

 

And the Moon with faint anticrepuscular rays and some Belt of Venus too!

5-24-21 816 PM EDT Moon and Anticrepuscular IMG-5680 sml.JPG


Edited by chrysalis, 25 May 2021 - 05:56 AM.

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#23 chrysalis

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 03:41 AM

Last night I went for my final attempt at sunset on Green Key Beach in FL. The waxing gibbous Moon also made a great target, and I was able to grab a sunset panorama that also included it. What is amazing is that in the original I can zoom in on the moon with fairly decent detail. Later, I captured the moon with some faint anticrepuscular rays.

 

Have a look!

 

#1 - the panorama - the Moon is to th right of the last palm tree on the left of the image. A shame it doesn't go into the post at the enlargeable size!

attachicon.gif5-24-21 SUNSET PANORAMA 759 PM EDT IMG-5632 5000.JPG

 

The Moon from the pan:

attachicon.gif5-24-21 SUNSET PANORAMA 759 PM EDT IMG-5632 MOON.JPG

 

And the Moon with faint anticrepuscular rays and some Belt of Venus too!

attachicon.gif5-24-21 816 PM EDT Moon and Anticrepuscular IMG-5680 sml.JPG

When I got back to the airbnb, Venus was prominent over the rooftops across the street at 8:39 PM EDT:

 

5-24-21 839 PM EDT NPR FL Venus IMG-5689 crop.JPG


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#24 ETXer

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 04:38 AM

A couple Android shots of Luna tonight...

 

...I just took the plunge (inspired by Allen, aka ETXer) and ordered my first camera. It's an ASI 224MC and it might get here by the weekend. I plan to try using it for the planets and Moon with the Super C8 Plus. I plan to be quite embarrassed by my efforts for some time thereafter, but will get better hopefully.

Great shots Brent! As has been seen here with all the excellent lunar images, smartphones do a quite capable job.

 

Have fun and good luck with your ASI224MC! I have the basic ASI120MC, but the ASI224MC is a step up and should provide outstanding results. The learning curve was a little steep at first starting from scratch, and I'm still nowhere near being completely proficient, but it's a little getting better each time. There's a lot of trial and error and YouTube video watching!

 

Cheers, Allan


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#25 brentknight

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Posted 25 May 2021 - 10:24 AM

Great shots Brent! As has been seen here with all the excellent lunar images, smartphones do a quite capable job.

 

Have fun and good luck with your ASI224MC! I have the basic ASI120MC, but the ASI224MC is a step up and should provide outstanding results. The learning curve was a little steep at first starting from scratch, and I'm still nowhere near being completely proficient, but it's a little getting better each time. There's a lot of trial and error and YouTube video watching!

 

Cheers, Allan

Thanks Allan.

 

It appears to be a lot easier to capture good Lunar pictures with the AT72EDII.  I'm not at all certain why.  Pictures through the Dobsonian and the SCT are usually awful.  I'll have to try again through the AT102ED and see how that works.

 

I've started doing the learning curve thing and it looks like Lunar pictures with the ASI camera will be much more difficult than with the Smartphone (I was hoping it would be easier).  I'm also not certain why the stacked image looks so much worse than the stacked > processed image.  If all that detail is in the stacked image, why do we have to work so hard to bring it out???

 

Anyway, I'm excitedly looking forward to jumping right in...


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