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Eyepiece / tips for 3 year old

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#1 VTstar

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Posted 16 June 2021 - 10:15 PM

Hi All,  My 3 year old nephew was final able to visit last week and to my surprise he is extremely excited about astronomy.  I spent several hours with him looking around stellarium and he really enjoyed it.  Even at 3 he know the names of many of the moons around many of the planets.  My question is, what is a good eyepiece for such a young person for planetary viewing?  I have a 102mm refractor, and I think at 3 years old saturn would be the most recognizable object to see for him. later in the summer when it's viewable at a reasonable time.  I was thinking probably ease of eye placement and a good eye relief would make it a bit easier for him.  Any thoughts or tips?

Thanks

Ryan


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#2 vtornado

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Posted 16 June 2021 - 10:30 PM

What is the f ratio of your 102? 

I would go for a 1 to 2mm exit pupil which means 1x to 2x the focal ratio.

60 degree eyepiece with medium eye relief and cheap unless you want him putting his fingers on your ethos.

Astrotec paradigm, 12 or 8mm,  TMB clone 9mm.   I have trouble with the expanse clones blacking out.



#3 aeajr

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Posted 16 June 2021 - 10:50 PM

Hi All,  My 3 year old nephew was final able to visit last week and to my surprise he is extremely excited about astronomy.  I spent several hours with him looking around stellarium and he really enjoyed it.  Even at 3 he know the names of many of the moons around many of the planets.  My question is, what is a good eyepiece for such a young person for planetary viewing?  I have a 102mm refractor, and I think at 3 years old saturn would be the most recognizable object to see for him. later in the summer when it's viewable at a reasonable time.  I was thinking probably ease of eye placement and a good eye relief would make it a bit easier for him.  Any thoughts or tips?

Thanks

Ryan

I would go for a zoom eyepiece.   

 

You say you have a 102 mm refractor but I have no idea which one so I can only guess that it is an entry level F6.5.  That would mean a 660 mm FL.

 

A 7-21 mm zoom would give you 31X to 93X, more than enough for the moon, Jupiter and Saturn.   Kids love zooms. 

https://www.amazon.c...23901802&sr=8-1

 

I have no idea what eyepieces you have now so can't advise on those. 


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#4 VTstar

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Posted 16 June 2021 - 11:08 PM

Good idea on the zoom, my scope is a f7.4 stellarvue svtr apo.  My usually planetary pieces are a 6mm delos and a 8mm televue plossl with barlow, but I think the eye placement might be tricky for him on the delos (plus kinda expensive) and the plossl's eye relief is tough.  



#5 LDW47

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 12:39 AM

3 years old ??


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#6 MisterDan

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 12:55 AM

3 years old ??

Three years old.  Yes.



#7 VTstar

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 06:27 AM

Ooops, misspoke, the scope I have has a FL of 714mm with 102mm aperture, making it f7 not 7.4

#8 aeajr

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 06:47 AM

If you would like something a little better, something you might also like, get the Baader Hyperion 8-24 Zoom, my favorite eyepiece.

https://www.eyepiece...on zoom&Submit=


Edited by aeajr, 17 June 2021 - 08:24 AM.


#9 epee

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 07:26 AM

I'd show my son the Moon and planets when he was two years-old.

I'd pick him up with my arms wrapped around him like he was rolled into a carpet (so he couldn't grab anything) and hold his eye over the eyepiece. I'd always go for a low-power, long eye relief eyepiece, often a 2".


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#10 spereira

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 07:28 AM

Moving to Eyepieces.

 

smp



#11 SeattleScott

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 08:04 AM

Maybe a 5mm paradigm?
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#12 aeajr

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 08:18 AM

If this will be a frequent visit and you would like to have the scope at a height for both of you, then you need one of these, or something similar.   Hehas plenty of room to stand and he has something to hold onto.

https://www.amazon.c...2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

 

I do a lot of outreach events.  I have found these work great for kids.



#13 Sky Muse

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 08:25 AM

I would suggest one of these, then over time to get two or three eyepieces, a proper star-diagonal, and a 2x-barlow...

 

https://www.bhphotov...qsaAl6QEALw_wcB



#14 LDW47

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 08:45 AM

To keep his attention up I would think a widefield scope ie f5-f6 is a great choice to see all those widefield enhancing objects. As time goes by he could still use it at medium powers as well and as time went by he could graduate to .......... . Its all part of the progressive fun, IMO.



#15 OIC

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 08:47 AM

My 3 year old grand daughter knows all the planets and some of the moons. Now if I can just get her down here at night to look through my telescope.



#16 Miranda2525

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 09:26 AM

3 years old ??

Well, normally you can relate. :lol:



#17 KBHornblower

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 09:44 AM

I used a 26mm Plossl with my Celestron 8 to give a colleague's young son a first look.  At age 3 and 1/2 he could not hold his head still enough to get his eye into the beam.  Six months later, on his 4th birthday, the reflexes in his neck and upper body had matured enough that he could get a good look at Saturn.  He said something like, "It looks like a space ship."

 

Children in that age group probably vary widely in how soon those reflexes shape up.  I think that eyepiece would be a good choice regardless of the scope.  My guess is that the eye relief is in the Goldilocks zone for a young child.



#18 LDW47

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 09:45 AM

Well, normally you can relate. lol.gif

My 2 boys are long past that age, we forget fast.


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#19 ShaulaB

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 09:54 AM

As a Mom and Granny, I would show the Moon to the child. Point it out in the sky naked eye. Then show in the scope at low power so all the Moon is in the eyepiece. Show a more magnified view of the Moon once the child has shown delight at recognition that what is seen in the eyepiece is a larger version of what is seen naked eye.

A Moon globe can be purchased for about $100 USD. It is a useful teaching tool.

The planets Jupiter and Saturn are very bright naked eye, so the same sequence will be good: point out the object naked eye, then show in the scope.
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#20 aeajr

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 11:00 AM

As a Mom and Granny, I would show the Moon to the child. Point it out in the sky naked eye. Then show in the scope at low power so all the Moon is in the eyepiece. Show a more magnified view of the Moon once the child has shown delight at recognition that what is seen in the eyepiece is a larger version of what is seen naked eye.

A Moon globe can be purchased for about $100 USD. It is a useful teaching tool.

The planets Jupiter and Saturn are very bright naked eye, so the same sequence will be good: point out the object naked eye, then show in the scope.

Excellent sequence.  I will be sure to remember this.



#21 sevenofnine

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 11:09 AM

Between the budget zoom eyepieces and the Baader zoom is the Celestron 8-24mm. It's shocking good for under $100. The main advantage for your 3 year old is the FOV widens considerably at the higher powers. You might really like it too. waytogo.gif



#22 AstroVPK

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 11:30 AM

My son started around 3 and really prefers my eyepieces with decent eye-relief, large AFOV, and a large eye-lens over some of my older Plossls.



#23 25585

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 11:37 AM

28mm RKE. They survive bring dropped, thrown, bitten and are cheap to replace. Also brightly coloured.

 

If only Astroscans were still made...


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#24 russell23

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 01:19 PM

For a 3 year old I would think an eyepiece with shorter eye relief would be a good choice.  I think the Orion 7-21 zoom would be a real good option.  It has enough eye relief for glasses if you need - a little tight over part of the range - but then is extremely comfortable and sharp without glasses.  For the Moon and planets this particular zoom is excellent - I sometimes use it instead of my DeLite's.

 

Dave



#25 JamesDuffey

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Posted 17 June 2021 - 01:49 PM

As a Mom and Granny, I would show the Moon to the child. Point it out in the sky naked eye. Then show in the scope at low power so all the Moon is in the eyepiece. Show a more magnified view of the Moon once the child has shown delight at recognition that what is seen in the eyepiece is a larger version of what is seen naked eye.

A Moon globe can be purchased for about $100 USD. It is a useful teaching tool.

The planets Jupiter and Saturn are very bright naked eye, so the same sequence will be good: point out the object naked eye, then show in the scope.

For kids, looking with binoculars is a good intermediate step between naked eye and telescope. 




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