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Eliminating (most of) the OTA in an OTA: shortening long-focus lenses with a 'spaceplate'

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#1 LMO

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Posted 21 June 2021 - 12:04 AM

I have not yet seen this very intriguing development mentioned on Cloudy Nights, at least not in its Refractor forum.  My apologies if I am duplicating an earlier post about this.

 

If I understand it correctly, implementation of the concept would permit construction of long focal-length refractors in (very) short tubes.  Among other things, that could greatly simplify design of mounts and make such optics again available to those with aging muscles and backs.

 

The original publication is in a highly respected, peer-reviewed journal, Nature Communications.

 

     Larry

 

Barrel-Eliminating Optical Element Enables Massive Zoom in Tiny Form Factor
<https://www.photonic...wsletter&PID=6>

"OTTAWA, Ontario, June 10, 2021 — A novel optical element will one day enable composite lenses and telescopes in a form factor small enough to fit in a pocket. The device, developed by Orad Reshef and Jeff Lundeen of the University of Ottawa, is called a spaceplate. Its function, say its developers, is to mimic the empty space needed to focus an image — meaning one day photographers will be able to take pictures of faraway subjects without lugging around a long-barrel telephoto lens."

“A spaceplate is an optical element that propagates light for a distance that exceeds its thickness,” Reshef and Lundeen told Photonics Media in an email correspondence. “From the perspective of a beam of light, after traveling through a spaceplate, it acts as if it has traveled through a thicker region of space.”

 

Original Publication:
An optic to replace space and its application towards ultra-thin imaging systems
Orad Reshef, Michael P. DelMastro, Katherine K. M. Bearne, Ali H. Alhulaymi, Lambert Giner, Robert W. Boyd & Jeff S. Lundeen
Nature Communications volume 12, Article number: 3512 (2021)
<https://www.nature.c...67-021-23358-8>



#2 Petripher

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Posted 21 June 2021 - 01:42 AM

This topic was discussed here: https://www.cloudyni...07-spaceplates/



#3 TOMDEY

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Posted 21 June 2021 - 02:02 AM

Yeah, the concept has been around for quite some time now. Unfortunately, it is loaded with both theoretical and (even if it were sound theory) gigantic implementation difficulties. Think cold fusion, laser energetics, solar and wind, warp travel, worm holes, wheel-less cars... You can fool Nature Magazine... but you can't fool Mother Nature. There are practical ways to shorten telescopes... but this one is little more than a cute pipe-dream. I respect them for trying to wrap their arms around it, but... that and a dime used to get one no more than a cup of coffee.    Tom


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#4 LMO

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Posted 21 June 2021 - 02:12 AM

This topic was discussed here: https://www.cloudyni...07-spaceplates/

Thank you for the link.  Again my apologies for duplicating an earlier thread.

 

    Larry



#5 RichA

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Posted 21 June 2021 - 04:07 AM

I have not yet seen this very intriguing development mentioned on Cloudy Nights, at least not in its Refractor forum.  My apologies if I am duplicating an earlier post about this.

 

If I understand it correctly, implementation of the concept would permit construction of long focal-length refractors in (very) short tubes.  Among other things, that could greatly simplify design of mounts and make such optics again available to those with aging muscles and backs.

 

The original publication is in a highly respected, peer-reviewed journal, Nature Communications.

 

     Larry

 

Barrel-Eliminating Optical Element Enables Massive Zoom in Tiny Form Factor
<https://www.photonic...wsletter&PID=6>

"OTTAWA, Ontario, June 10, 2021 — A novel optical element will one day enable composite lenses and telescopes in a form factor small enough to fit in a pocket. The device, developed by Orad Reshef and Jeff Lundeen of the University of Ottawa, is called a spaceplate. Its function, say its developers, is to mimic the empty space needed to focus an image — meaning one day photographers will be able to take pictures of faraway subjects without lugging around a long-barrel telephoto lens."

“A spaceplate is an optical element that propagates light for a distance that exceeds its thickness,” Reshef and Lundeen told Photonics Media in an email correspondence. “From the perspective of a beam of light, after traveling through a spaceplate, it acts as if it has traveled through a thicker region of space.”

 

Original Publication:
An optic to replace space and its application towards ultra-thin imaging systems
Orad Reshef, Michael P. DelMastro, Katherine K. M. Bearne, Ali H. Alhulaymi, Lambert Giner, Robert W. Boyd & Jeff S. Lundeen
Nature Communications volume 12, Article number: 3512 (2021)
<https://www.nature.c...67-021-23358-8>

Cue, "Dream on" by Aerosmith.  One thing you have to know about all those "tech news sites;" 99% of the grand break-throughs they announce never come to pass in any meaningful way.  Especially about battery stories.



#6 TOMDEY

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Posted 21 June 2021 - 10:25 AM

Cue, "Dream on" by Aerosmith.  One thing you have to know about all those "tech news sites;" 99% of the grand break-throughs they announce never come to pass in any meaningful way.  Especially about battery stories.

Could be that retired editors from Mechanix Illustrated and Popular Science picked up part-time jobs at Nature. Full disclosure... I still read and enjoy them all and keep old issues on the coffee table with the grandkids' fantasy books. Well... I'm out to the car to install this magnet that will get me from NY to CA on a tank of water.   Tom

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