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BIG comet

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#1 havasman

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Posted 23 June 2021 - 03:30 PM

https://twitter.com/phbernardinelli

 

Also SPACEWEATHER.COM today


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#2 Cotts

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Posted 23 June 2021 - 04:03 PM

At a BIG perihelion distance, it seems.  Orbit of Saturn...... Won't even be naked eye...

 

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#3 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 24 June 2021 - 12:19 PM

https://skyandtelesc...r-solar-system/



#4 Redbetter

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Posted 25 June 2021 - 07:00 AM

It is big and is going to take a long time to make its pass.  Based on orbital period of 1+ million years and the relatively wide perihelion, I suspect it will have plenty of volatiles left to off gas and could prove quite interesting.  At Saturn's orbit it likely won't be a particularly bright comet at peak, but the 1729 comet that passed just within Jupiter's orbit and became about as bright at the Andromeda Galaxy.  This object is bigger, but will be about 3x more distant (so perhaps more "pristine" having made far fewer passes and at far greater distance.) 

 

They are already seeing 15 arc seconds of coma with it nearly a decade from perihelion.  I am not quite sure how to evaluate how bright it might become, but it wouldn't surprise me if it brushed naked eye visibility based on the relative size compared to the 1729 comet (size difference being good for about 1 magnitude improvement by my estimate.)  If it has not made prior passes that were closer, then perhaps it will have more volatiles than one might assume for the wider perihelion.  


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#5 Ron359

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Posted 25 June 2021 - 11:03 AM

It is big and is going to take a long time to make its pass.  Based on orbital period of 1+ million years and the relatively wide perihelion, I suspect it will have plenty of volatiles left to off gas and could prove quite interesting.  At Saturn's orbit it likely won't be a particularly bright comet at peak, but the 1729 comet that passed just within Jupiter's orbit and became about as bright at the Andromeda Galaxy.  This object is bigger, but will be about 3x more distant (so perhaps more "pristine" having made far fewer passes and at far greater distance.) 

 

They are already seeing 15 arc seconds of coma with it nearly a decade from perihelion.  I am not quite sure how to evaluate how bright it might become, but it wouldn't surprise me if it brushed naked eye visibility based on the relative size compared to the 1729 comet (size difference being good for about 1 magnitude improvement by my estimate.)  If it has not made prior passes that were closer, then perhaps it will have more volatiles than one might assume for the wider perihelion.  

The current estimates are it might make 17 to 16th mag.  



#6 Special Ed

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Posted 25 June 2021 - 01:53 PM

I'll be interested in what Carl Hergenrother and John Bortle have to say about this comet.




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