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The Observing Side of EAA - what have you seen lately?

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#1 Mark Lovik

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Posted 08 July 2021 - 06:12 PM

There are different themes to EAA that are all appropriate.  Live streaming, and outreach events are two that come to mind where we can share views of the skies with others.  There are other themes that may be stretching the definition of EAA.  If we are more worried about the final picture than observing the wonders of the sky, or doing significant post processing ... well we may be falling down the AP slope.  I have spent some time analyzing my raw data and replaying the stacks to find better ways to image quickly and effectively.  This is my stretching the EAA definition - and follows into the technical details of EAA, and is a major subtopic on this thread.  These discussions have been great getting me up and running quickly.  Instead of giving up faint fuzzies - I can really see them at home - and quickly.

 

This leads to the other side of EAA.  Using all this fun technology to observe the skies in our own way.  I have seen some great EAA live streaming videos, where the views and background of the objects are the focus.  I am just observing ... not streaming yet ... but this is great.   The focus is on the objects we can now see, in the skies we live with.

 

 

So what have you observed lately using EAA?  Instead of the technical details, what did you see, and what did you like in the sky.

 

To get started ... for me (lately)

 

1. Looking at the range of globular cluster's in the sky.  I really like M3 -- seems to be may favorite at this time.  These are the ancient artifacts of the milky-way and I am working to compare as many of these objects as I can.  In the night sky I can play with the histogram (and some processing that seems to really help view these objects in SharpCap) to change what parts of the clusters I want to look at.  

 

2. Doing the same thing with galaxies - but galaxies have a wider range of types and views.  Here I am early on in the process, and just getting familiar with the taxonomy and evolution of galaxies.  M51 has been my favorite, but currently I really like M101.  Notice the face on galaxies with spiral arms are getting my initial interest.  10 seconds into the view and it's a galaxy screams out to me.  Its getting a bit later in the year to see these, and looking forward to looking at M31 and M33.  My biggest issue is getting a wide enough view for these two objects.  I can only see 1-2 degrees at a time with my current system.  That could work for M33 but not M31.  So I intend to spend some time scanning across these two galaxies as they rise earlier in the night sky.  Should be interesting.

 

PS - tried visual on these two galaxies last week at nearby (darker) skies -- bleh.


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#2 alphatripleplus

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Posted 08 July 2021 - 10:10 PM

I'm finishing off a project to view all the Arp galaxy groups via EAA and my C8 - I have a few more Arps to do and it has been a fun project.


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#3 chilldaddy

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Posted 10 July 2021 - 02:53 PM

I have been using a short focal length OTA to enjoy the Milky Way recently.  I was pleased to see the Lobster Nebula and Cat's Paw Nebula in Scorpius in the same FOV with an AT60ED and ASI533.  The L-eXtreme filter did a fabulous job in my Bortle 8 skies and even though conditions were below average and it was low, there was still interesting detail.  I saw more than I recalled from last year without the filter so it certainly cut through the LP to provide views of faint tendrils as well as nice contrasting areas of Ha and dark dust.  It wasn't good enough to bother saving (especially with the roof line partly in view lol.gif ) but was still fun.  I look forward to returning under better conditions as well as exploring more of the region without the filter under darker skies.

 

Greg


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#4 roelb

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Posted 10 July 2021 - 04:56 PM

In 2019 I managed to image 208 Arp's

In 2020 I concentrated on using the ASI533MC-Pro during ~50 sessions

Lately I'm interested in nebulae

There is so much to see in the universe...smile.gif


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#5 tomlindquist

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Posted 13 July 2021 - 01:02 PM

I had a friend coming over last night who wanted to see something EAA through the telescope, so in spite of the fairly heavy smoke layer here I responded by putting the scope on some bright globular clusters and M57 that penetrated the smoke nicely.   Some normally bright targets like M51 and M27 were pretty degraded by the smoke and my only shooting 10 second subs.   M13 and M3 and M57 were particularly nice, and we said thank goodness for bright globular clusters and had a good time.  C.S. 


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#6 Jeff Lee

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Posted 13 July 2021 - 01:55 PM

Spending some time Cygnus for nebula and open clusters. Be using only my 4" and the C5 - tend to use the C8 more in spring and fall. EAA is a very powerful drug.....


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#7 Mark Lovik

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Posted 13 July 2021 - 06:13 PM

Currently I am taking a mandatory visual only break - my mount decided to go belly up on me last week (during the darker skies).   There is nothing wrong with visual -- but my target selection becomes more limited.  I will be back running soon, but this reinforces all the advantages looking at the sky electronically.

 

I have a target list a mile long ... it has just been delayed a bit.


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#8 roelb

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Posted 13 July 2021 - 07:18 PM

I had a friend coming over last night who wanted to see something EAA through the telescope, so in spite of the fairly heavy smoke layer here I responded by putting the scope on some bright globular clusters and M57 that penetrated the smoke nicely.   Some normally bright targets like M51 and M27 were pretty degraded by the smoke and my only shooting 10 second subs.   M13 and M3 and M57 were particularly nice, and we said thank goodness for bright globular clusters and had a good time.  C.S. 

During full moon open/globular clusters are my preferred objects.


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#9 nic35

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Posted 15 July 2021 - 01:50 PM

Clouds.  But somedays I can't even see the clouds for the fog.  Grumble.

 

john


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#10 alphatripleplus

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Posted 15 July 2021 - 01:52 PM

I'm finishing off a project to view all the Arp galaxy groups via EAA and my C8 - I have a few more Arps to do and it has been a fun project.

The Arps that I am missing won't be up in the sky for a few months, so this project still has a way to go. 


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#11 Mark Lovik

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Posted 16 July 2021 - 09:50 AM

For the responses on the Arps, where do you get your information on Peculiar Galaxies?  In print is the Arp: Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, and Huey: Observing the Arp Peculiar Galaxies.  i am still early in my galaxy hunting with EAA, but this fits my observing interests.

 

 This leads into a few EAA galaxy questions (that seem to parallel visual discussions looking for galaxies in big Dobs)

 

1. What is the reach of typical EAA systems when looking for faint galaxies?  Translation: what are current limits of what I can find and see in the sky.

a. Example: my 3" f/6 APO, mono camera, and Bortle 5'ish skies in the backyard - I can easily image compact galaxies at magnitude 17 ... if they are reasonably high in the sky and within a 10 minute limit.

b. I have an 8 SCT and a 0.5x reducer that have not tried yet with EAA. How much improvement can I expect compared to the 3" system in the same skies? 

2. What tends to be the biggest factor that limits detecting and observing faint galaxies?

a. Light pollution and seeing

b. Aperture

c. F ratio and imaging time  

d. Other

 

 

Yes ... I am cheating a bit from my initial thread post and going a bit technical.  I am just curious on what are reasonable expectations and limits of the galaxies I can observe using EAA.    The current observing comments in this thread are prodding me to expand my observing plans. wink.gif


Edited by Mark Lovik, 16 July 2021 - 09:57 AM.

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#12 roelb

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Posted 16 July 2021 - 11:18 AM

For the responses on the Arps, where do you get your information on Peculiar Galaxies?  In print is the Arp: Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, and Huey: Observing the Arp Peculiar Galaxies.  i am still early in my galaxy hunting with EAA, but this fits my observing interests.

 

 This leads into a few EAA galaxy questions (that seem to parallel visual discussions looking for galaxies in big Dobs)

 

1. What is the reach of typical EAA systems when looking for faint galaxies?  Translation: what are current limits of what I can find and see in the sky.

a. Example: my 3" f/6 APO, mono camera, and Bortle 5'ish skies in the backyard - I can easily image compact galaxies at magnitude 17 ... if they are reasonably high in the sky and within a 10 minute limit.

b. I have an 8 SCT and a 0.5x reducer that have not tried yet with EAA. How much improvement can I expect compared to the 3" system in the same skies? 

2. What tends to be the biggest factor that limits detecting and observing faint galaxies?

a. Light pollution and seeing

b. Aperture

c. F ratio and imaging time  

d. Other

 

 

Yes ... I am cheating a bit from my initial thread post and going a bit technical.  I am just curious on what are reasonable expectations and limits of the galaxies I can observe using EAA.    The current observing comments in this thread are prodding me to expand my observing plans. wink.gif

1. try it out your self

2. f ratio & exp. time/gain



#13 alphatripleplus

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Posted 16 July 2021 - 11:28 AM

For the responses on the Arps, where do you get your information on Peculiar Galaxies?  In print is the Arp: Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, and Huey: Observing the Arp Peculiar Galaxies

In addition to what is in print, there are a number of online resources. This website is a good place to start with when looking.

 

I have found that many of the Arps show notable features in exposures as short as 5 minutes  using a mono camera from my Bortle 4 location.


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#14 roelb

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Posted 16 July 2021 - 11:49 AM

In addition to what is in print, there are a number of online resources. This website is a good place to start with when looking.

 

I have found that many of the Arps show notable features in exposures as short as 5 minutes  using a mono camera from my Bortle 4 location.

other interesting sources:

http://arpgalaxy.com/arplist.html

http://www.stellar-j...g/arpgalaxy.htm

https://en.wikipedia...culiar_Galaxies

http://www.richweb.f...cts.htm#ARP_167

http://www.faintfuzz...ingGuides2.html

https://www.cloudyni...s-in-collision/

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Halton_Arp

https://cseligman.co...xt/arpatlas.htm

http://338arps.com/


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#15 Mark Lovik

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 01:42 PM

I am back and running in EAA again with a working mount.  Had a chance to observe some objects before the moon became a problem, then a few objects after the moon was up (bit less successful).

 

Last night had a chance to view (in mono):

 

  • M27 - looked really nice and crisp.  I really need to see how my EAA view maps to a large aperture dark sky visual view in the future
  • C33 - this is a bit of a stretch on my sensor and mono, but had it framed reasonably well. 
  • C19 - provides a subtle beauty in mono.  Not the same as typical overt narrow band images online, but nice with the dark and light regions over a dense star background.
  • M2, M13, M15, and M71.  The first three provide a sharp contrast to M71, the star backgrounds and size are drastically different.
  • M31 - rotated the camera to get as much of the central region as possible (less than a degree).  The view was muddled by the moon, and this is an object where I really need to start taking flats for live viewing.  The view was suggestive instead of overwhelming.

Edited by Mark Lovik, 27 July 2021 - 01:42 PM.


#16 jgraham

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 01:24 PM

I'm currently using the evenings between the waxing and waning gibbous moon to image the planets. While I've got my planetary gear set up with SharpCap I spend some time taking a peek at the moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and double stars. Jupiter is particularly active and there's always something to see. I really enjoy watching the moon and shadow transits and eclipses. It's also fun to use the live stack function in SharpCap to observe details on the moon and planets. Most recently I caught a moon and shadow transit of Io, and a day or so later I watched Io and Europa emerge from behind Jupiter.

Fun stuff!
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#17 GazingOli

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 02:15 PM

I am trying to make the best of the rare clear nights in Germany. This is my first year of EAA and so there is a lot to discover in the night sky. In spring there were a lot of galaxies, which I did in B&W. In the beginning of summer I did the summer nebulae which worked better with my new (used) ASI294 camera this year. Last time I focussed on PNs because The Moon was too bright.

 

Most of the good shots are published in the gallery section or in the Monthly Observation Challenge and also in my personal gallery (link in my signature).

 

CS.Oli


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#18 nic35

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 08:25 AM

With apologies to the Platters, smoke gets in  my eyes.   Fortunately, tomorrow looks good for me.

 

Went out recently and could barely make out Deneb, and ground level smoke looked like fog.

 

smoke.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



#19 Mark Lovik

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 09:48 AM

nic35 - I have been having similar problems.  One morning last week had Saturn blacken and drop out of view while I was watching.  It was at a lower angle, but no clouds.  It was just the smoke getting in the way.

 

I can often use EAA to view objects when visual conditions are marginal.  Saturn was (for a time) my fallback for getting up on a night where even EAA would not work.


Edited by Mark Lovik, 29 July 2021 - 09:53 AM.


#20 GazingOli

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 10:10 AM

Yesterday I set up under good conditions - then clouds came and went and I had to do real sky-hopping:

 

  • NGC 6960 in CYG
  • IC 1795 in CAS
  • M 20 in SGR
  • IC 5146 again CYG
  • NGC 281 back in CAS
  • NGC 6781 in AQL

2021072727all.jpg

 

Then there were too many clouds and I had to give up. Still a nice space-walk. Not for GEM mounts but no problem with the CPC on wedge.

 

CS.Oli


Edited by GazingOli, 29 July 2021 - 02:55 PM.

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#21 ensign

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Posted 30 July 2021 - 11:47 AM

With apologies to the Platters, smoke gets in  my eyes.   Fortunately, tomorrow looks good for me.

 

Went out recently and could barely make out Deneb, and ground level smoke looked like fog.

 

attachicon.gifsmoke.JPG

 

I feel your pain. Here in South Georgian Bay, clear sky with abysmal transparency has been the norm for several weeks.  Smoke from wild fires in Eastern Manitoba and Western Ontario floats high in the atmosphere.  And then we’re typically cloudy  all winter.

 

I hope the fall turns out better.  At least this spring was pretty good.  Got a bunch of new gear and ample opportunities to try it out.


Edited by ensign, 30 July 2021 - 11:49 AM.


#22 MarMax

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Posted 03 August 2021 - 11:59 AM

What I've seen lately is all I've seen in EAA. With three nights under my belt it's getting better, thanks to all the great assistance here.

 

M13, M22

M16, M27

M51, NGC6946

 

gallery_332504_17333_289951.jpg

 

EDITED to add SQM of about 18 in my light polluted back yard.


Edited by MarMax, 03 August 2021 - 01:56 PM.

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#23 Tfer

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Posted 06 August 2021 - 10:56 AM

After 2 months+ of living in twilight, we finally reach astronomical darkness here, so I decided to go after a couple of nebulas a couple of nights ago.

 

The Cocoon Nebula (IC 5146) and the Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635).  I had a tough time controlling the red channel, but I think it’s because of the 294’s sensitivity in the IR, so next time I image them, I’ll try a cutoff filter.

 

Images cropped, and compressed for upload.

 

Edited to add: 8 second exposures w/gain at 300.  Cocoon nebula - 24:40 exposure time. Bubble nebula 32:00 exposure time.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 60A140D7-BF66-4285-8322-53F932C10C21.jpeg
  • D0A6E8B9-B11E-45DC-AD1F-616CC17C2D6C.jpeg

Edited by Tfer, 06 August 2021 - 11:05 AM.

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#24 alphatripleplus

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Posted 06 August 2021 - 11:43 AM

We've had a couple of more transparent nights recently. I don't know how many times I can do EAA captures of M8, M20, M16 and M17 to the south, but I still haven't got tired of looking at those. A few nights ago, I was finishing up late, and looked towards M8 with my naked eyes and could see it  quite plainly. The Lagoon really is a bright target.


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#25 ensign

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Posted 06 August 2021 - 12:14 PM

Lots of smoke up here in the Great Lakes.  One evening, however, the transparency was less awful than usual and I got outside with my Equinox 120, Mallincam DS10c and L-Pro filter.  

 

Here are the results (snaps only no post-processing whatsoever):

 

https://groups.io/g/...album?id=266765

 

I was particularly happy to snag Barnard’s Galaxy.




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