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Livestreaming

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#1 driveelectric

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 11:14 AM

Just getting started researching livestreaming the view in one of my telescopes.  I've looked at mallincamp.  

 

If money is not a concern, what setup would you go with?

 

Here's a photo of the area at which we would show the images.

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  • vidieo+area.jpeg


#2 Gary Z

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 12:37 PM

Have you looked at OBS?  It is free software, but quite robust.  It will stream to any online venue, such as FB, google, twitch, etc and works quite well.  I've used it several time from my backyard to stream views of the moon and planets.  

 

There are plenty of useful youtube videos on OBS and how to setup and use it.

 

Gary



#3 driveelectric

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 10:18 PM

Have you looked at OBS?  It is free software, but quite robust.  It will stream to any online venue, such as FB, google, twitch, etc and works quite well.  I've used it several time from my backyard to stream views of the moon and planets.  

 

There are plenty of useful youtube videos on OBS and how to setup and use it.

 

Gary

What hardware/camera etc you recommend for livestreaming?  Can you tell me all the equipment I'll need?



#4 scrufy

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Posted 12 July 2021 - 11:38 PM

I just use twitch and the Nvidia Driver(Geoforce Experience).

‘Geoforce auto logs into Twitch and I also make offline videos etc with it.

It works very well and all free.


Edited by scrufy, 12 July 2021 - 11:41 PM.


#5 mikenoname

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Posted 13 July 2021 - 08:19 PM

Have a look at my latest live stream where I go over my setup at the beginning. Then you can also see the software I am using throughout the video (mostly SharpCap):

 

https://youtu.be/zi7bO5z46Fk

 

Also, you can look at one of Gary Hawkins' live streams. He goes over not only his gear list but all of the software he uses to do his streams (he had technical difficulties at the beginning of this stream so start at ~17:10):

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=CRYybAGTHzI


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#6 EmeraldHills

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Posted 14 July 2021 - 07:12 AM

DriveElectric, we're glad for Willis Observatory (and all their constituents) that you're asking these questions. Your entire community will thank you!

 

There is no doubt - adding live-streaming to an already complex hobby will increase the tech burden of your astronomy. But you really do have much of the hard work already in the bag - if you have a working scope and mount. According to your website, you already have a UFO landing pad -- maybe the only one in the United States! You simply HAVE to add livestreaming! : )

 

Can you tell us which scope you were thinking of outfitting with live-streaming? That might speak a bit into the process. But, in general, you will need an astro camera, of course. (But maybe you already have one somewhere in the observatory?) Most any camera will do - but the easiest kind would be the kind of camera with a USB output. Most any modern ZWO-type camera is perfectly suited to live-stream. If you've already configured the camera to the scope you plan to use (say, for astrophotography), you're halfway there. If not, please consult the camera manufacturer's website or your vendor for help hooking up the camera to the scope. If you haven't purchased a camera, there are many. One popular camera here on CloudyNights is the ZWO ASI183MC Pro - but ...warning... ask 10 astrophotographers which would be the best all-round camera to buy and you'll get 21 different answers. No lie. Still, even though I no longer own the 183, it's a great choice. Your vendor can help you adapt it to your scope.

 

The second element you'll need is some kind of livestreaming software and a laptop upon which to run it. Most of this stuff seems to assume a Windows PC. Any current laptop would do - but I personally would recommend something designed for video. If you have the dollars, get something with a fairly powerful chip. Tell your vendor you're going to create and edit videos - and you'll be in the right ball park. (Lesser laptops will work. But the first time you try to edit a two-hour live-streaming video, you'll be glad you stretched.) Gary is right -- OBS has become the de facto standard. It's free -- and amazing. Using OBS, you'll choose and configure the camera as the source of content for a "scene." To learn how to use it, just go to YouTube and search for "livestream with OBS."

 

Next you'll need a streaming service - like YouTube (again, the de facto). On YouTube itself, search for "create a YouTube channel for livestreaming." There will be clear instructions to connect your OBS setup with your new YouTube channel.

 

Those are the main components. Isn't it amazing that you don't need any more equipment than that? Just a camera, a laptop, and some software. YouTube (and other streaming platforms) have made it super easy.

 

Questions?



#7 driveelectric

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Posted 14 July 2021 - 09:05 AM

DriveElectric, we're glad for Willis Observatory (and all their constituents) that you're asking these questions. Your entire community will thank you!

 

There is no doubt - adding live-streaming to an already complex hobby will increase the tech burden of your astronomy. But you really do have much of the hard work already in the bag - if you have a working scope and mount. According to your website, you already have a UFO landing pad -- maybe the only one in the United States! You simply HAVE to add livestreaming! : )

 

Can you tell us which scope you were thinking of outfitting with live-streaming? That might speak a bit into the process. But, in general, you will need an astro camera, of course. (But maybe you already have one somewhere in the observatory?) Most any camera will do - but the easiest kind would be the kind of camera with a USB output. Most any modern ZWO-type camera is perfectly suited to live-stream. If you've already configured the camera to the scope you plan to use (say, for astrophotography), you're halfway there. If not, please consult the camera manufacturer's website or your vendor for help hooking up the camera to the scope. If you haven't purchased a camera, there are many. One popular camera here on CloudyNights is the ZWO ASI183MC Pro - but ...warning... ask 10 astrophotographers which would be the best all-round camera to buy and you'll get 21 different answers. No lie. Still, even though I no longer own the 183, it's a great choice. Your vendor can help you adapt it to your scope.

 

The second element you'll need is some kind of livestreaming software and a laptop upon which to run it. Most of this stuff seems to assume a Windows PC. Any current laptop would do - but I personally would recommend something designed for video. If you have the dollars, get something with a fairly powerful chip. Tell your vendor you're going to create and edit videos - and you'll be in the right ball park. (Lesser laptops will work. But the first time you try to edit a two-hour live-streaming video, you'll be glad you stretched.) Gary is right -- OBS has become the de facto standard. It's free -- and amazing. Using OBS, you'll choose and configure the camera as the source of content for a "scene." To learn how to use it, just go to YouTube and search for "livestream with OBS."

 

Next you'll need a streaming service - like YouTube (again, the de facto). On YouTube itself, search for "create a YouTube channel for livestreaming." There will be clear instructions to connect your OBS setup with your new YouTube channel.

 

Those are the main components. Isn't it amazing that you don't need any more equipment than that? Just a camera, a laptop, and some software. YouTube (and other streaming platforms) have made it super easy.

 

Questions?

Your response is so helpful.  Thank you so much.

 

We have 2 telescopes dedicated to DSO astrophotography:  PlaneWave20 and Astro-Physics 140.  Don't want to change those.  We have Astro-Physics 715 and Takahashi 300 for star gazing. I'm still a "newbie - 2 years in" but I've learned every telescope has advantages and disadvantages.  I'm thinking of using primarily the Tak 300 for livestreaming (really like it on the moon, planets, globs, and double stars) but we love to use the Astro-Physics to scour the universe so would maybe use that one too.

 

I have a Basler acA1920-155um Ace - IMX174, 1/1.2", C-Mount, 1920x1200, 155fps, Mono.  Figuring out how to use it for solar imaging is next up on my to do list.

 

I've learned a lot in 2 years.  So much more to learn. So much more to do.  Solar up next, observing and imaging.  We have a Lunt 152.  But next after that is livestreaming.  We have gotten several requests for livestreaming.

 

Thank you so much for your help.



#8 EmeraldHills

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Posted 14 July 2021 - 12:12 PM

Can't wait to see your work!




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