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Astronomy after Lasik

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#26 Serial

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 03:53 PM

Thanks everyone.  

 

TLDR: Keep getting consults until you feel comfortable.  Get a procedure that measures higher order aberrations, like Contoura.  That said, I haven't had the surgery yet, so we'll see.  

 

 

I was completely unimpressed with my first consult.  They were not very friendly and rushed me through.  They didn't explain what they were doing or looking for.  At the end they just said, "You're a candidate, it will be 4 grand, when can I schedule you."  I didn't even talk to the doctor. 

 

I got another consult at what I know to be the most reputable place in town.  I didn't start there because I figured it would be much more expensive. (It was $4,500). 

 

It was night and day difference.  They were so helpful and friendly and spent tons of time with me.  They dilated my eyes and probably used 6 or 7 instruments to examine my eye.  They also made me stop wearing contacts a few days before so my eye could go to its normal shape.  (They other place did none of this).  

 

I told them I would be a tough sell and am concerned about things like night vision, coma, and other higher order aberrations (not the typical questions they get I'm sure). 

 

This doctor only does Contoura Custom Lasik.  Part of the screening for this procedure is to use an instrument that maps your eye's spherical aberration.  They showed me my eye maps and said that I have really good night vision and all my blurriness is coming from refraction error, not higher order aberrations.  This makes it much less likely that my night vision will be negatively impacted, in fact, the Contoura claims to make it even better.  

 

The doc spoke with me for 40 minutes and answered all my questions with good evidence.  So I'm taking the plunge.  I'll report back how it went.  


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#27 Dobs O Fun

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 10:09 PM

I guess it's bad when medical procedures are more like negotiating for a car. Something so important about your health like your vision should never be taken granted.

My ophthalmologist from long ago did not recommend lasik, perhaps due being in infancy or maybe didn't want to lose my glasses and contact business.

After reading the after effects here it made me wake up and realize that a doctor should discuss in length the effects it would do to you.

Edited by Dobs O Fun, 04 August 2021 - 10:10 PM.


#28 virajp

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Posted 05 August 2021 - 12:31 PM

I'm an ophthalmologist and perform LASIK surgery and other refractive procedures regularly.
Its unfortunate that there are quite a few bad experiences here. But LASIK is quite safe and effective. Pre operative work up done deligently (higher order aberrations, optical zone - which determines glares and haloes) reduces problems. Night vision problems including glares and higher order aberrations can be found out pre procedure.
An excellent alternative is an ICL (Implantable Collamer Lens) The visual outcome is better than LASIK and its reversible too if at all the need be.
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#29 therealdmt

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Posted 06 August 2021 - 03:37 AM

I'm an ophthalmologist and perform LASIK surgery and other refractive procedures regularly.
Its unfortunate that there are quite a few bad experiences here. But LASIK is quite safe and effective. Pre operative work up done deligently (higher order aberrations, optical zone - which determines glares and haloes) reduces problems. Night vision problems including glares and higher order aberrations can be found out pre procedure.
An excellent alternative is an ICL (Implantable Collamer Lens) The visual outcome is better than LASIK and its reversible too if at all the need be.

How about LASEK?



#30 Dobs O Fun

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Posted 06 August 2021 - 01:24 PM

How about LASEK?


I thought you were kidding
.. but no you were not.

https://www.webmd.co...r-eye-surgery#1
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#31 virajp

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 08:40 AM

How about LASEK?


LASEK is an outdated procedure and no longer advocated.

#32 Mike G.

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 09:45 AM

I considered LASIK for a while because of my severe astigmatism. But then I went to a good Ophthalmologist and after 2 hours of testing and discussion of what I wanted my vision to be, she told me I had cataracts and they could correct the astig with toroidal lenses. I get the first eye done in 2 weeks. I will update. We discussed my concerns with my existing halos and spikes, she seemed confident it would be much improved after the lens implants. 


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#33 Serial

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 08:50 AM

I received my Contoura Custom Lasik yesterday afternoon.  This morning I went for my post op check up.  I am now 20/15 from a staring point of 20/800 (-7 diopter).  

 

Every moderately bright to bright edge has large fuzzy halos around it, but it is less than 24 hours post surgery; I'm told this is very normal.  

 

I'm really excited about my vision and they think my prognosis is excellent.  Time will tell how the higher order aberrations subside. 


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#34 hoof

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Posted 04 September 2021 - 11:16 PM

I avoided Lasik for the last 15 years or so since I have no astigmatism in my observing eye and am able to refocus for sharp views. Did not want to risk wrecking the wavefront correction of my corneas since I valued the views too much.

Fast forward to two years ago and I stumbled upon a “natural” way to recalibrate my eyes (myopia is just a miscalibration of the eyes, largely due to full prescription correction used for close up viewing for long periods causing the eyes to adjust in a myopic direction). Two years into it my eyes are now at 3 diopters myopia vs my starting point of 4.75 diopters myopia. I estimate it will take at least another 4 years to get to “20/20”.

I don’t recommend this approach unless you want to prove it can be done, as it takes a long time (0.75 diopters of improvement per year). You also have to step down every 4 months or so with your glasses, and maintain two sets of glasses (one set for close up, another for distance). I have several dozen pairs of glasses for this project. So it’s kind of like wearing braces for years and years, except you change the braces every 4 months.

The reason I mention it because surgery isn’t the only way. I miscalibrated my eyes “naturally” by using too strong glasses for near work for two decades. Now I deliberately induce far sighted miscalibration to undo all that. It turns out that eyes can shift both ways. It’s just really slow :)
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#35 Starman1

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Posted 14 September 2021 - 07:01 PM

I was planning on getting it when I turned 50 so I wouldn't have to deal with glasses anymore. I started putting it off when I heard about potential complications. Now at 63, I have no intention of getting it. For some though, it's a game-changing experience, so I think you have to weight the pros and cons carefully.

Lasik will not stop the progress of presbyopia, which results from a hardening of the lens and the lessened ability of the lens muscles to control the shape of the lens.

The inability to focus closely will grow as long as you live.

Nearsightedness may mitigate, but normal vision will steadily grow less able to focus close up.

When the lenses in the eye get hard enough that accommodation diminishes substantially, you may end up needing correction for both near and far at the same time.

It is inconvenient that your vision doesn't freeze at infinity, LOL.

If you get cataracts at some point, replacement lenses can yield some improvement in focus at certain distances--that is something to discuss with the ophthalmologist.

At 70, I have no cataracts, but if I did need lens replacement, I'd be willing to accept perfect vision at infinity without glasses to eliminate glasses at the scope even though that would mean

wearing glasses for all other distances.


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#36 Mike G.

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Posted 15 September 2021 - 07:45 AM

My cataract surgery is now complete.  both eyes corrected, mono-focus toric lenses set to infinity focus.  there were other options, standard lenses with no astig correction, a relatively new technology with tri-focal lenses (for near, mid and far correction) and going with different mono focal correction in each eye (one set to close, one set to infinity).  the tri-focal lenses (available with astig correction as well) are a bit pricey but more important, are reported to produce a 'halo' around bright objects, particularly when against a dark background.  for obvious reasons, I did not select the tri-focal lenses.  in toric, mono-focal lenses, you can have one eye set to focus near, and the other eye set to far.  I had already actually had a pair of glasses already made in this configuration to deal with my indoor shooting hobby.  the 'far' eye lets you focus on the target ring, while the near focus lets you deal with loading, evaluating targets, etc.  this system worked perfectly for me and I was able to do close work and have infinity focus easily.  it's quite amazing what our brains can do - switching back and forth from one eye to the other was instant and effortless.  however, I do really enjoy using my many binos, particularly the APM 100's, and since my vision requires so much correction, I was afraid that the 'one eye close, one eye infinity' approach may end up with some of my binos not being able to accommodate the large differences, plus, sharing them would really be difficult.

so I chose to have both eyes set to infinity (and use readers for close up work, like now) and have my astigmatism corrected.  the results are nothing short of amazing.  I now have 20/20 vision uncorrected, and during the exam, I had the Dr. put up the 20/15 line and using both eyes, it was readable.  Jupiter no longer has spikes reaching out to it's moons, Luna is now a single image, not 3 separate ones and I can see immediately after getting up in the morning and when taking a shower.  the actual surgery is done in 10 minutes, you are awake but sedated, and you can see immediately after the surgery is completed (but not very well until about a day).  completely painless, until the bill comes... 



#37 javad

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Posted 15 September 2021 - 09:22 AM

I'm considering Lasik surgery. I just read there is a decent chance I'll suffer from Higher Order Aberrations like coma and spherical aberrations, especially in low light conditions. If this surgery corrects my blurriness but causes halos, diffraction spikes, and coma around stars at night, I'd be really bummed.

Can anyone speak from experience on this?


I had lasik last year, I had near sightedness and ver mild astigmatism. I can live free of glasses.
My observing eye is as good as ever, my left eye has some distortions, probably because I started observing next day of the surgery. Squinting might have distorted the cornea before it fully healed. But, in general, pretty pleased. In azerbaijan it only costs 800$ compared to 5-6k in the us, so you could take a trip here to have your lasik and go back there with money to spare :))

#38 javad

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Posted 15 September 2021 - 09:24 AM

Lasik will not stop the progress of presbyopia, which results from a hardening of the lens and the lessened ability of the lens muscles to control the shape of the lens.
The inability to focus closely will grow as long as you live.
Nearsightedness may mitigate, but normal vision will steadily grow less able to focus close up.
When the lenses in the eye get hard enough that accommodation diminishes substantially, you may end up needing correction for both near and far at the same time.
It is inconvenient that your vision doesn't freeze at infinity, LOL.
If you get cataracts at some point, replacement lenses can yield some improvement in focus at certain distances--that is something to discuss with the ophthalmologist.
At 70, I have no cataracts, but if I did need lens replacement, I'd be willing to accept perfect vision at infinity without glasses to eliminate glasses at the scope even though that would mean
wearing glasses for all other distances.


Don,

You are 70?

Wow.

#39 FloridaFocus

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 01:06 PM

I had lasik last year, I had near sightedness and ver mild astigmatism. I can live free of glasses.
My observing eye is as good as ever, my left eye has some distortions, probably because I started observing next day of the surgery. Squinting might have distorted the cornea before it fully healed. But, in general, pretty pleased. In azerbaijan it only costs 800$ compared to 5-6k in the us, so you could take a trip here to have your lasik and go back there with money to spare :))


I considered something similar (Bolivia, though, instead of Azerbaijan). It's strongly recommended to avoid flying for a couple of weeks after lasik, which deterred me from pursuing the option further. Anyone know if that's still the case?

#40 CowTipton

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Posted 16 September 2021 - 01:14 PM

I had Lasik 5-6 years ago.

Best thing I ever did for my vision.

 

The first few weeks were a little uncomfortable with the all the eye drops and healing, night vision was a little strange with halos.  It went away within a month or so.

I haven't had any negative effects from it.  Vision is 20/15 with the right eye and 20/20 with the left.

 

I do have floaters now and I do need reading glasses now (both started about two years ago) but that's to be expected as I entered the ranks of the middle aged.

I'd do it again in a heartbeat.


Edited by CowTipton, 16 September 2021 - 01:14 PM.

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#41 Serial

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Posted 17 September 2021 - 08:25 AM

I had lasik last year, I had near sightedness and ver mild astigmatism. I can live free of glasses.
My observing eye is as good as ever, my left eye has some distortions, probably because I started observing next day of the surgery. Squinting might have distorted the cornea before it fully healed. But, in general, pretty pleased. In azerbaijan it only costs 800$ compared to 5-6k in the us, so you could take a trip here to have your lasik and go back there with money to spare smile.gif)

 

Hahaha.  Yeah, it did cost me 4.5k.  But I'll be sure to recommend that people head over to Azerbaijan for their lasik.  



#42 Serial

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Posted 17 September 2021 - 08:29 AM

Well, I'm two weeks out from my Lasik.  I think the halos are getting a little smaller but is still far from perfect.  My eyes are quite dry in the mornings and evenings.  I'll be totally happy if these things go away.  Apparently it can take 6 months to resolve. 


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