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Equatorial Wedge Adjustment and LX200 Alignment

Polar Alignment Meade Beginner
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#1 dellavolpe

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Posted 15 July 2021 - 02:00 PM

Hello everyone; I'm a beginner in astronomy and astrophotography (and sorry for the big text). Two months ago I purchased a 10" Meade LX200 GPS (I haven't updated the Autostar yet because I bought the cable via internet and it's about to arrive). I'm Brazilian, I live in the state of São Paulo (22° 45' 17'' South, Longitude : 47° 24' 52'' West), so the alignment differs from the manual. I also acquired an equatorial wedge; to calculate the complementary angle, I take into account Zenith - latitude = 90o - 22o = 68o (approximately - a clinometer on the cell phone can be used to check these 68o?) Is the angle I should mark on the wedge correct?
I entered my city (latitude and longitude, changed the alignment to polar), date and time, before doing the alignment by Sigma Octanis. I did the "one star" alignment, but when I enter the Go To command (for Saturn, for example), there is poor accuracy; I make new adjustments and can't keep up. Probably, due to my very little experience, I am making mistakes in the process, made difficult by living in the southern hemisphere. Could someone help me with a verification tutorial for my condition? Most of the videos I find on YouTube refer to Alignments in the Northern Hemisphere, by Polaris. Thank you very much for your attention.



#2 diceless

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Posted 15 July 2021 - 02:47 PM

Dellavolpe, you are outside the latitude range for the wedge. At a latitude of 22 you are under the min latitude of 25.

#3 diceless

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Posted 15 July 2021 - 02:53 PM

Let me expand the answer. North/South latitudes use the same scale, the only difference is which way you point the wedge. In the northern latitudes, you point it north. And in the southern latitudes, south. At 22 degs south, you need to set the wedge to 22 degs on the scale and the telescope points south. The most wedges will not support 22 north or south.

#4 TimK

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Posted 15 July 2021 - 03:19 PM

I believe the old style Equatorial wedge (not the SuperWedge) could go down to zero degrees if you removed the deluxe altitude adjustment rod.



#5 carolinaskies

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Posted 15 July 2021 - 03:27 PM

If you can't get your proper adjustement on the wedge simply adjust your tripod legs to dip a bit lower to give you the extra few degrees of adjustment you need.  Long term you could have wedge made to fit between the base of the telescope and the wedgeplate to raise up the back of the telescope enough to provide adjustment.  In these two cases you can ignore the actual scale on the side of the wedge.  Consider using your cellphone to properly find the south celestial pole,  https://skyandtelesc...olar-alignment/



#6 Supernova74

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Posted 15 July 2021 - 03:34 PM

Well another alternative if you have a reasonable mechanical mind set,and are good with your hands I’ve seen amateurs make there own wedge!?



#7 nitegeezer

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Posted 15 July 2021 - 05:14 PM

If you extend the range with the tripod, I have done this and it works great, make sure the tripod is still well balanced and stable with your scope. If it is a bit tipsy, it is counterintuitive but extend the tripod legs out further. While it does raise the scope up which would make a fall worse, it also increases the foot print which makes it more stable.


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