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The unthinkable is starting to happen- a waning interest in astronomy

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#1 Tyson M

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 12:51 PM

A large portion of me has considered astronomy my primary life's interest, particularly for the past decade.  Whether it was learning about cosmology by reading various books, to the journey of trying many different telescopes and designs, to simply enjoying the solace that the night sky brings me the odd time I get to go out and escape the every day hustle and bustle I am so used to.  The hobby and knowledge base of astronomy has brought me order and structure to my life and even purpose.  It helped bring me out of the darkest period of my life, and to focus on something.  That new-found focus evolved into small life goals setting, and eventually life changes which has changed me for the better.

 

That being said, I am starting to feel astronomy burn-out. I recently bought a ton of astro books I definitely want to read, but cant be bothered to even pick them up right now- much to my guilt...

 

I have amazing telescopes which I will keep and love to use, when I get to use them. I rarely get to use them and I found myself daydreaming about astronomy more than anything. Ever-spending money on new ways to help me enjoy it more. I do not need to spend much more money at all, although the astro list still has some "nice to have or try" items on it: a small grab and go refractor for the backyard in winter, night vision, and to finish up an observatory of some kind.  Although I don't want to spend a great deal of money on it as long as it functions as I need it to.

 

Recently I finally got into another hobby, Warhammer 40k.  I used to play back in the day and thought I would dive in again. Yes, more money (unfortunately) but it can help keep me occupied regardless of the weather with painting models, or when I am finished that, playing war games against others. This has been my new vice that entertains a great majority of my thoughts these days.

 

I can't help but feel a bit ashamed to be no longer thinking about astronomy 24/7.  I find myself only checking CN for moderation purposes now, which before about a month ago, I was a regular contributor here and just HAD to keep up to date on a multitude of forums because I thoroughly enjoyed immersing myself in it all thoroughly.

 

I have time at work to check CN, which wont change, but I do not check CN much at home in my spare time besides the odd classified search for some reason. Old habits they say....

 

I find myself always having very little amounts of free time anyways, especially with the limited amount of days off I have been having.  I've worked more days than I have ever in my life this year with overtime, bought a house, a new vehicle, ect.  

 

Anyways, my astro hobby interest is waning and I feel guilt over it. I think my lack of free time this year has had a part in this waning interest and not getting out as much as I'd like.  

 

I think long term, a waning interest now is truly for the best for me and hobby, as it will give me a renewed interest in it. Invigorating me with a new zest for learning about astronomy, and providing much-needed ambition to complete the mountain of reading material I own (a source of guilt for me).

 

Of course any clear night I will use my telescopes, as this is like a mini-vacation for me when doing so. But no longer a clear day or night is this the ONLY thing I have to look forward to hobby-wise. It certainly makes it easier on me when the clear sky chart is wrong and my plans are foiled yet again.  I get a bit upset when that happens.

 

I have read countless other threads here on CN of people saying the exact same thing I am saying above, and I told myself it would never happen to me.  Now I can see why others recommend getting into another hobby, as astronomy as an only hobby is in itself- not sustainable or an exercise in frustration.

 

There is no point of this post but to share my thoughts. I am not quitting the hobby or even reducing my online CN time (more than it already has been reduced that is).  I would never get rid of my eyepieces, or sell a telescope without an immediate plan to replace it.  I get the majority of August off work and hope to get out under the stars a lot which could help my internal conflict.

 

Just looking to hear thoughts from others.  Perhaps others who have felt the same waning interest, took a break, and came back in "bigger and better". Cheers


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#2 RyanSem

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 01:14 PM

I'm not long enough into this hobby to really have phases, but I definitely suffer from new-hobbyitis. When I start a new hobby, everything about my life revolves around it for an unspecified period of time. For example...

 

I'm a big history buff, and I thought it'd be cool to read a biography about every president. So I spent a couple months only reading lengthy biographies, then got burnt out after Quincy and haven't yet continued. I have 2 bios on Jackson lined up and ready to go... but it was just too much too fast so I took a break. And my pile of fiction books were calling to me. (Wheel of Time currently has control of my life). 

 

I recently got introduced to Geocaching this year. It's a ton of fun. But I found 100 geocaches within my first 2 months and now I find only a couple per week. It's time-intensive and I realized kind of annoying during summer because of tall weeds and overgrowth, so I'm not hitting it as hard as I did initially. 

 

I've always been interested in collecting watches. So I spent a couple months reading all the watch forums, watching tons of YouTubers explain their watches, brands to look out for, etc. But it's an expensive hobby, and with a wedding, a house, a new job, it was just too much to stay invested in it, even as a casual viewer. 

 

My interest with astronomy is stronger and it has been part of my life for longer, but just like my other hobbies, my world no longer revolves around it. I had 321 observations in 2018, the first year my interest began. That dropped almost in half to 167 in 2019. 2020 saw 191 observations, but this year we're more than halfway through and I'm only at 50. I read 5-6 astro books last year, and so far this year I've read none. So, I'm currently in a little bit of an astro lull.

 

Part of the problem is the limit I'm able to see with my scope. Once I finished the Messier list I didn't have much reason to go back to the faint fuzzies. I get more enjoyment out of outreach events then just searching tiny objects. I bought an astro camera last year and that re-ignited the spark. I got pictures of most the planets, then sold the camera once I realized I needed to seriously size up for deep sky photography. I know that once I get a fast refractor and an expensive camera I'll be sucked back into astronomy in a huge way. But I need to save up first and have the time to dedicate towards astrophotography. 

 

And that goes for most my hobbies. I know I'll get back into the watch community soon. I just need to save up money. I know I'll get back into presidential biographies again. I just need more free time. And I haven't stopped geocaching yet, but when I do I know it will only be temporary. 

 

There's so much to do, see, and experience in this world, that even when I find something I love to do, there's a small part of me looking for the next thing to experience. When I move on from a hobby it's never a permanent good-bye, I know I'll be back, I just need to explore the next new thing I'm hooked on. And that's OK. 



#3 weis14

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 01:15 PM

I wouldn't worry about it too much.  We all need breaks now and then.  Its never good to get too obsessed over one hobby to the exclusion of your overall happiness.  


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#4 Astrojensen

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 01:16 PM

There's nothing wrong in having several hobbies. I have a small hobby farm, and that also takes time and frequently a bit of money, and I repair my farm machinery myself. I also like to read and write and have thousands of books. 

 

But not a day is passing, without me thinking and doing astronomy some time during the day. 

 

 

Clear skies!

Thomas, Denmark 


Edited by Astrojensen, 18 July 2021 - 01:17 PM.

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#5 skybsd

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 01:20 PM

Hello, 

 

...

That being said, I am starting to feel astronomy burn-out. 

...

Just looking to hear thoughts from others.  Perhaps others who have felt the same waning interest, took a break, and came back in "bigger and better". Cheers

I have been through this.., 

 

I took a break for ~3 years from the hobby (work, life etc) and marginally got back into observing (I'm visual-only and have only ever been interested in DSOs) but I guess since my now being split between the US and the UK, my observing time was nowhere near what it was like before. 

 

As for my participation on CN, I have to say - things seem different here and not in a good way.., As a result, I do not wish to post (nor bother to read beyond titles of) nor respond in most cases. Not wanting to take away from your post, so I'll leave that alone. 

 

What does help is the awareness of the need to actually maintain the equipment, so I do get motivated every now and then after spending time working on the mounts, OTAs and eyepieces - there's nothing quite like the feeling I get when mucking around with scopes, eyepieces and mounts that will get my motivation levels up.., 

 

So not quite "bigger" nor would I call it "better", but the fact that I actually go out every now and then ==> progress in my book.., 

 

Best.., 

 

skybsd 


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#6 siriusandthepup

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 01:33 PM

No worries.

 

Life is too short for guilt. Don't do it.

 

Keep your astro toys. Just store them safely in climate control conditions. Then forget about it all.

 

The toys will be ready when you are again.

 

Enjoy, guilt free, some new interests.

 

whee.gif

 

Oh, stop bye once in a while and visit us on CN.


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#7 Oyaji

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 01:36 PM

Not sure if the scopes listed under your signature are your only scopes, but 2 of them are big, beautiful monsters--a 25" Dob and a 9" refractor (I never knew there was such a thing!).  It must be a huge hassle setting them up, not to mention wear and tear on your back. 
 
Maybe you sell one of your big, beautiful monsters and invest the proceeds in an astrophotography rig.  That won't solve your weather problem, of course, and it's still a bit of a hassle to set up and polar align an astrophoto rig, but your astro journey would veer off in an exciting new direction. 
 
Plus, while your photo rig is collecting photons, you could still collect photons the old fashioned way--with your eyes.  Maybe get a used c8, which takes zero time to set up with a simple alt-az mount.  
 
And, after all, the universe does look better in color!
 
P.S.  Processing astrophotos is a lot more fun than playing computer games, IMHO. I speak from experience.

Edited by Oyaji, 18 July 2021 - 02:34 PM.

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#8 Sky King

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 01:37 PM

Maybe a little inspiration is all that's needed. Try watching this a few times. Galileo Galilei would flip if he could see this. Enjoy. 

 

"Part of the problem is the limit I'm able to see with my scope. Once I finished the Messier list I didn't have much reason to go back to the faint fuzzies. I get more enjoyment out of outreach events then just searching tiny objects. I bought an astro camera last year and that re-ignited the spark. I got pictures of most the planets, then sold the camera once I realized I needed to seriously size up for deep sky photography. I know that once I get a fast refractor and an expensive camera I'll be sucked back into astronomy in a huge way. But I need to save up first and have the time to dedicate towards astrophotography."

 

Consider EAA to start with.  A entry camera like the ASI224MC and a old laptop will work. It's a lot of fun, less expensive, forgiving and works, with the power of stacking. Here's a great imaging book.

 

Even if you take a break, the sky will be there waiting. 


Edited by Sky King, 18 July 2021 - 02:16 PM.

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#9 bobzeq25

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 01:42 PM

Guilt is totally inappropriate.  You like what you like.

 

I quit astronomy after many years, because my old eyes were inadequate.  Astrophotography brought me back, I now do more than ever.  See things I never could have seen before, with my equipment, in my skies.  It is expensive, in money, time, and effort.  Definitely not for everyone.

 

But it's how modern professional astronomy is done.


Edited by bobzeq25, 18 July 2021 - 01:42 PM.

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#10 xvariablestarx

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 01:51 PM

My hobbies are, anything to do with science, and listening and attempting to play music; any thing related to those, I am interested in. I also like playing MMOs, and reading. It is good to alternate in hobbies. Don't go away from astronomy, just don't make it the center of your life.


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#11 grif 678

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 02:00 PM

Hi

This thread you started is now happening to me as well, and though most of the responses have been positive, it finally gets to a point to where positivity is no longer an option for later.

I remember about 65 years ago, when I started to notice the night sky, especially at Christmas when Orion and the brightest stars filled the night sky, I would often wonder which one was the Christmas star. Astronomy has been the most important hobby in my life since that time. I spent numerous hours reading astronomy books back in the 60's, The Golden Guide to Astronomy, The Sky Observers Guide, many Field guides, etc. It happened that the space race was at a fever pitch, and that added to the fun of the hobby. After several toy telescopes, finally got a 76mm Sears, and serious observing started. and I never thought that this time would ever come, when I would start to lose interest.

But besides age, other things creep into the picture. Astronomy is not as exciting as it once was, because about everyone in the world knows about everything about our solar system, galaxies, and all the other things in the night sky. You can find anything you  want to find by holding small electronic devices in your hands, and press buttons, and there it is. Even 5 year olds can do this, they do not need a telescope.

Sure, if you are a middle age observer, things may change again, and you may regain interest. But honestly, for us older ones,  things are not the same as they were when we started our interests, so it is hard to regain interest the way things are today. Imagine, if us older generation, if we had the things that kids have today, and we could find out about anything going on in the world and the sky in just seconds, we probably would have not ever got started in the hobby the way we did.

We began the hobby by learning as we went, the fun way and exciting way, and that way can not be replaced with electronic gadgets. Nights after nights out with our telescopes, much darker skies, trying to see detail on Mars, seeing Jupiter's moons, Saturn's rings, maybe one day being able to see Pluto. Those were the days.

Now a young person can see all that and more with the press of a button, and that is not astronomy to me.

So back to the original thought, to me, getting back into the interest of observing, things would have to be like they were when I first started, and it will never be that way again, and to be honest, it is depressing. The simple things in life are the best, and the simple beginnings of learning astronomy in the early years were the best, and we can not bring them back, no matter how hard we try, no matter how hard we pray, it can't be done. I have tried different things, bought the same telescopes over that I had in earlier years, hoping to rekindle the interest, but it may work for a month or two, then reality sets back in.

Things change, and for us old school viewers, it may not be fr the best as far as our fading hobby goes. But we can be thankful for one thing. Even though it may be coming to an end, I would not trade the years of learning with my scope, night after night, and the excitement I enjoyed, for any other hobby.


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#12 Supernova74

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 02:09 PM

Well to start off with don,t beat yourself up about it and like you already said yes,it’s only a hobby at the end of the day.

and the night sky will not go anywhere and will always be there for you when and if you return.anyway after I’ve read your post you do come across as an all or nothing type of guy that absolutely fine however the problem there is if you go all guns blazing and literally jump into the deep end so to speak then can kind of leave you deflated and over whelmed.then any hobby doesn’t become enjoyable anymore and in some part a tad un healthy.

 

And this is comming from someone me!? Lol who does suffer from severe depression and anxiety and i at times can become possessive over things Astronomy included.however now I’ve got a little bit older I’ve started to learn it’s ok to take a step back once and a while,take a deep breath and re analyse the situation hopefully for the better.So my story is i might have to give up the hobby for a while not because i want to more to change of circumstances kind of scenario and instead of me just panicking in not being able to observe at the moment,So then I’m left in a predicament shall i sell all my Astro kit or should I just hold on to it and see what happens.so what ever happens I’m sure the universe will help me along the way in my decision making and what will be will be i guess and even if I did sell my kit I’ve still got 1000,s of things i can learn and brush up on my knowledge in my own time and pace.and at the end of the day i have to give up observing for a while

yes i will come back stronger as for me Astronomy is in my DNA and a form for therapy and astronomy is for life not just for Christmas.


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#13 MarMax

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 02:25 PM

I'm new to astronomy but have been a fisherman all my life. Mostly saltwater fishing and the past 20 years with a boat. I would consider it expense and equipment-wise very similar to astronomy. The equipment is specialized, it can be very expensive, it requires use and maintenance, and most importantly, it's very physical.

 

So at 62 with a waning interest I'm considering dropping the fishing hobby. But the main reason is the physical effort necessary to go fishing and clean up. It's long days, sometimes multiple days, sometimes quite rough and definitely physically demanding. With astronomy it can be physical if you choose but for the most part it's a much more forgiving hobby.

 

If I flipped these two hobbies so that I was in your shoes and feeling about astronomy the way I feel about fishing now, I would say don't feel bad about losing interest in something you've loved for many years. It's just how life progresses and you must have something important that is replacing this time.

 

You plan to keep the gear and you can always re-start down the road a bit.


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#14 kfiscus

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 02:47 PM

I was in a multi-year lull in my astronomy life when I lucked into an observing buddy.  He and I share the same interests in targets and have the same visual accuity.  There is no way to guarantee such a happy result for the OP but I would recommend looking for someone that you could share the fun, work, and hassles with.  It could be a kid, a geezer, or someone in between.  Good luck.


Edited by kfiscus, 18 July 2021 - 02:47 PM.

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#15 DeanS

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 02:56 PM

With our run of poor weather I have lost some of my drive to get out.  Even on nights I would normally go out and mess around, I just make an excuse.  I keep saying next season will be different, but seems like they are over before you know it and have not done much imaging or viewing.


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#16 The Ardent

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 03:13 PM

Go back ten years and very few of the frequent posters are still around. From my few years in the hobby, I’d say 99% of people who get into astronomy are gone soon after , like meteors that briefly shine and are never seen again . Until 10 years later they contact the club only to sell the telescope they were advised against in the first place. 

 

I think the biggest problem of out hobby is that it is fundamentally opposed to our civilization. The world wants us to be up at day and sleep at night. Watch TV and internet instead of sitting outside alone at night. Spend money on necessities , superfluous money on dining out, travel, vehicles, entertainment, cheap junk goods and trifles; not scientific instruments. Light up every corner of the world , not preserve dark sky. Learn obscure trivia about celebrities, not science. 
 

Every need and tradition of typical everyday living precludes astronomy. 
 

It’s a hobby that very few can make a living off. 

 

I feel that to be successful at astronomy one must reject the temporal world (to a degree) like John Dobson and Robert Burnham Jr. 

 

How many times has a perfect night gone unseen because the life demanded ___________ instead? Many times for me. 
 

Another thing I see is the “What so I observe post Messier? “ The astronomy media has ingrained on us to observe “objects” as an end in itself. While study of Messiers can be a laudatory lifelong end in itself, the sky offers much more than the traditional objects. 
 

I believe the Messiers are a great introduction to observing. It should lead to the observer wanting more, and making their own choices about what next. 
 

Im working on lists of objects, some official , some my own. However in the past couple of years a have just observed and let the targets come to me. It’s as if I’m lazily sitting by the river , thrust in my hand,  and scoop up a litter of gold and diamonds without effort. If I see some faint galaxies glowing amidst the stars, that’s very nice, but if it’s too faint for my conditions, I don’t worry about and move on. 

 

Earlier this year I observed much of Canis Minor. To begin each session I used Delta Mon to align my finder . It’s also a good skymark for excellent planetary nebula NGC 2346. To my discovery the very Milky Way in the vicinity of Delta is a worthy target of interest. I could spend an entire evening exploring this area , without any specific objects in mind. 
 

Now Jupiter is coming back to the evening sky. How many have seen a shadow transit? Seen a moon suddenly appear out of Jove’s shadow? Or slowly fade as it enters? That’s a whole field of study in itself. And with all the moons, dozens of chances to see something wondrous. 

So my advice for anyone feeling burnout. Give it a break for a while. Come back when the desire hits. Try some different things. Read up. Learn the names of the stars or the Big Dipper. Recite the Greek alphabet. Keep some binoculars handy and attempt to spy the most southerly thing possible (Like Gamma Velorum from my latitude) 
 

 

 


 


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#17 csrlice12

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 03:23 PM

"Anyways, my astro hobby interest is waning and I feel guilt over it. I think my lack of free time this year has had a part in this waning interest and not getting out as much as I'd like. "

 

This.......all work and no play is not healthy and very, very true.  It affects our health both physically and mentally.


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#18 sickfish

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 03:32 PM

If it goes on the back burner for a while thats fine.

It will come back.

Although my love for fishing has never waned. Weird.


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#19 Supernova74

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 03:52 PM

Just to add it’s not unheard of in this hobby,infact quite common folks can loose that connection with astronomy however from my understanding the main reasons seem to be change of circumstances or health related issues this is my third time round now and even tho I’m unable to observe at the moment im lucky that the spark,and passion still remains intact.its a very difficult bug to shift once you had that taste.ironic as it may sound you reach a certain age in your life you finally can afford perhaps your dream telescope which you once drawled over as a kid only to find out that the stresses of life and change of circumstances get in the way.


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#20 Tyson M

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 05:40 PM

It is possible I could just be burned out too much from my job, NOT astronomy.

Not sure if the scopes listed under your signature are your only scopes, but 2 of them are big, beautiful monsters--a 25" Dob and a 9" refractor (I never knew there was such a thing!). It must be a huge hassle setting them up, not to mention wear and tear on your back.

Maybe you sell one of your big, beautiful monsters and invest the proceeds in an astrophotography rig. That won't solve your weather problem, of course, and it's still a bit of a hassle to set up and polar align an astrophoto rig, but your astro journey would veer off in an exciting new direction.

Plus, while your photo rig is collecting photons, you could still collect photons the old fashioned way--with your eyes. Maybe get a used c8, which takes zero time to set up with a simple alt-az mount.

And, after all, the universe does look better in color!

P.S. Processing astrophotos is a lot more fun than playing computer games, IMHO. I speak from experience.

Yes I still have the scopes and dont plan on getting rid of them. I do agree that I need a grab and go though but im not really an imager. Some dabble in lunar or solar imaging work only. Maybe EAA in the future but not jumping for it.
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#21 Tyson M

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 05:42 PM

Guilt is totally inappropriate.  You like what you like.

 

I quit astronomy after many years, because my old eyes were inadequate.  Astrophotography brought me back, I now do more than ever.  See things I never could have seen before, with my equipment, in my skies.  It is expensive, in money, time, and effort.  Definitely not for everyone.

 

But it's how modern professional astronomy is done.

Visual astronomy is my passion, but to each's own.  Everyone can enjoy the hobby in different ways.


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#22 Tyson M

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 05:45 PM

Hi

This thread you started is now happening to me as well, and though most of the responses have been positive, it finally gets to a point to where positivity is no longer an option for later.

I remember about 65 years ago, when I started to notice the night sky, especially at Christmas when Orion and the brightest stars filled the night sky, I would often wonder which one was the Christmas star. Astronomy has been the most important hobby in my life since that time. I spent numerous hours reading astronomy books back in the 60's, The Golden Guide to Astronomy, The Sky Observers Guide, many Field guides, etc. It happened that the space race was at a fever pitch, and that added to the fun of the hobby. After several toy telescopes, finally got a 76mm Sears, and serious observing started. and I never thought that this time would ever come, when I would start to lose interest.

But besides age, other things creep into the picture. Astronomy is not as exciting as it once was, because about everyone in the world knows about everything about our solar system, galaxies, and all the other things in the night sky. You can find anything you  want to find by holding small electronic devices in your hands, and press buttons, and there it is. Even 5 year olds can do this, they do not need a telescope.

Sure, if you are a middle age observer, things may change again, and you may regain interest. But honestly, for us older ones,  things are not the same as they were when we started our interests, so it is hard to regain interest the way things are today. Imagine, if us older generation, if we had the things that kids have today, and we could find out about anything going on in the world and the sky in just seconds, we probably would have not ever got started in the hobby the way we did.

We began the hobby by learning as we went, the fun way and exciting way, and that way can not be replaced with electronic gadgets. Nights after nights out with our telescopes, much darker skies, trying to see detail on Mars, seeing Jupiter's moons, Saturn's rings, maybe one day being able to see Pluto. Those were the days.

Now a young person can see all that and more with the press of a button, and that is not astronomy to me.

So back to the original thought, to me, getting back into the interest of observing, things would have to be like they were when I first started, and it will never be that way again, and to be honest, it is depressing. The simple things in life are the best, and the simple beginnings of learning astronomy in the early years were the best, and we can not bring them back, no matter how hard we try, no matter how hard we pray, it can't be done. I have tried different things, bought the same telescopes over that I had in earlier years, hoping to rekindle the interest, but it may work for a month or two, then reality sets back in.

Things change, and for us old school viewers, it may not be fr the best as far as our fading hobby goes. But we can be thankful for one thing. Even though it may be coming to an end, I would not trade the years of learning with my scope, night after night, and the excitement I enjoyed, for any other hobby.

Perhaps sketching the planets or the sun might kindle some interest?  The sun always changes and Jupiter especially can be exciting, as well as Mars and Saturn. Yes we might know more than ever now than ever, but planetary observing is different each outing. Sketching trains you on new skills.  I have only dabbled but want to do more at a future time for sure.

 

Nowadays not many people are regularly looking at the planets with telescopes. 


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#23 Tyson M

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 05:51 PM

*snip I’ve still got 1000,s of things i can learn and brush up on my knowledge in my own time and pace.and at the end of the day i have to give up observing for a while

yes i will come back stronger as for me Astronomy is in my DNA and a form for therapy and astronomy is for life not just for Christmas.

This is just it, I am not done with learning. There is 1000's of things left to learn still, and to see, if I can ever get out on a clear night with a day off, or when I decide to have ambition to pick up an astro book.


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#24 Creedence

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 05:52 PM

I too have difficulty immersing myself in more than one passion at a time. I’m just coming back, and knocking the dust off all of my astro stuff after a 6 month absence where I’ve been focused on sailing- my other money pit.

Though I may shift my focus from time to time (for months, or in some cases, years), astronomy is always there for me, ready to be picked back up. It’s a gravitational pull- gentle, almost unnoticeable, but it’s persistence always seems to bring me back- whether that’s later or sooner.
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#25 Tyson M

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Posted 18 July 2021 - 05:53 PM

"Anyways, my astro hobby interest is waning and I feel guilt over it. I think my lack of free time this year has had a part in this waning interest and not getting out as much as I'd like. "

 

This.......all work and no play is not healthy and very, very true.  It affects our health both physically and mentally.

I think this is a big point.  I might not even be feeling astronomy burn out.  I might just be feeling burn out in general from work that has spilled over to astronomy.  Combined with not many clear skies on my very few days off.


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