Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

The unthinkable is starting to happen- a waning interest in astronomy

  • Please log in to reply
157 replies to this topic

#76 Supernova74

Supernova74

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,760
  • Joined: 25 May 2020
  • Loc: Epsom surrey near (London)

Posted 25 July 2021 - 06:02 AM

Unhealthy? I think not. The acquisition of new gear creating new challenges and opportunities is what drives our interest and the industry that facilitates it.
 

And your entitled to your opinion however I’m going by the information received from the op!? No amount of gear or additional exspense will change matters if that spark and drive has disminished.

You can guide and lead a horse to water however you cannot make it drink same principle.

 


Edited by Supernova74, 25 July 2021 - 06:04 AM.


#77 Tyson M

Tyson M

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 6,070
  • Joined: 22 Jan 2015
  • Loc: Canada

Posted 25 July 2021 - 07:45 AM

Well that doesn’t make much sense!?

from your original post the impressions i got your interest was waning in astronomy you puchasing another scope I feel will not help matters for you at the moment. however that’s entirely up to you.however I don’t mean come across disrespectful to you or anything however there is a narrow line there between being passionate about something which could turn into a obsession and just be careful that’s all that your only receiving a buzz from the initial puchase as that could become unhealthy!?

I was hoping to have a smaller to deploy scope that can get me outside more when conditions are not perfect.   

 

I have passed on a few nights with intermitted cloud cover because my two main scopes are a bit of work to set up. One requires me to drive to a dark site, the other is just a lot of work to set up for the backyard.

 

It is the principle of grab and go to get a few more nights in a year with limited time.


  • csa/montana, russell23 and 25585 like this

#78 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,125
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 25 July 2021 - 08:18 AM

I was hoping to have a smaller to deploy scope that can get me outside more when conditions are not perfect.   

 

I have passed on a few nights with intermitted cloud cover because my two main scopes are a bit of work to set up. One requires me to drive to a dark site, the other is just a lot of work to set up for the backyard.

 

It is the principle of grab and go to get a few more nights in a year with limited time.

Good decision IMO.  A smaller refractor will give you better opportunities to just set up and observe.  There are some nights where that will be the best option.  


  • 25585 likes this

#79 Tyson M

Tyson M

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 6,070
  • Joined: 22 Jan 2015
  • Loc: Canada

Posted 25 July 2021 - 08:41 AM

To extend on my last post, my waning interest was brought on by my lack of observing, lack of opportunities to observe.

 

Astronomy is very much a passion of mine. Just was looking at exploring other hobbies to help with my lack of observing as of late.


  • 25585 likes this

#80 Ihtegla Sar

Ihtegla Sar

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,000
  • Joined: 02 Apr 2019
  • Loc: Pacific Northwest

Posted 25 July 2021 - 12:31 PM

To extend on my last post, my waning interest was brought on by my lack of observing, lack of opportunities to observe.

Astronomy is very much a passion of mine. Just was looking at exploring other hobbies to help with my lack of observing as of late.


You can't have too many hobbies. Even ones that get put on the back burner for years, like astronomy for me, can resurface later in life.

My grandpa lived to 99 and he had good physical and mental health until nearly 98 but he didn't have any hobbies and after his wife died he seemed pretty miserable for his last 20 years because he didn't have anything to do. No hobbies. And at that age he didn't seem to have any interest in picking up new hobbies.

Before I saw that you had purchased a 115mm refractor, I was going to recommend a grab and go refractor to compliment your larger instruments, especially since it sounded like you were more burned out with work than astronomy.

I have a 20" dob (about as large as I can handle by myself at my age) kept at a dark site, but driving out there takes time, set up and collimation takes time and energy, and then there are cooling issues.

My 4" Tak doublet is much easier to set up and cools down in just a few minutes all year round.

Like you I still have work obligations and the weather frequently gives me partly cloudy nights (or cloudy nights with maybe a break for an hour or two of clear sky) and the 4" refractor lets me get some observing in on nights where work obligations or weather conditions would preclude observing with a larger scope.

I've been amazed what I can see with just 4" refractor under light polluted skies. Planets, double stars, carbon stars, open clusters, globular clusters, a few of the brighter planetary nebula and of course the Moon are my targets of choice for evenings at home. Last week after the moon set I was able to find M71 and to my surprise my little Tak was able to resolve it even with the light pollution of an urban back yard. Just last night I got a good view of Jupiter. Although I couldn't make out Europa in transit, many bands, two barges and the GRS were visible. Epsilon Lyra was easily split at 100x (never gets old). The Nova v1405 in Cassiopeia looks like its brightened to about mag 6 again, and I spent about an hour trying to learn some of the main features on the Moon. Perhaps not as exciting as tracking down an Abell Nebula in a big dob under dark skies but an enjoyable two hour observing session in the back yard with a small scope, with very little set up time.

And it's not like your 115mm refractor is going to lose value. So if you ever decide to sell it you can get your money back. I see no downside to the purchase.

Some of the older folk around here are going to recommend something smaller for grab and go, but at 36 you won't have any problem with setting up a 115mm quickly and with very little effort. I had about ten times as much strength and energy at 36 as I do now at 54. The advancing years and some health issues have slowed me down a bit. One reason I got back into astronomy two years ago, I suppose -- the amount of energy required for astronomy is much less than the hobbies I was pursuing at 36. "Once I moved about like the wind." Not anymore, but I can't complain. At least I'm still moving.
  • Tyson M likes this

#81 Supernova74

Supernova74

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,760
  • Joined: 25 May 2020
  • Loc: Epsom surrey near (London)

Posted 25 July 2021 - 12:43 PM

You can't have too many hobbies. Even ones that get put on the back burner for years, like astronomy for me, can resurface later in life.

My grandpa lived to 99 and he had good physical and mental health until nearly 98 but he didn't have any hobbies and after his wife died he seemed pretty miserable for his last 20 years because he didn't have anything to do. No hobbies. And at that age he didn't seem to have any interest in picking up new hobbies.

Before I saw that you had purchased a 115mm refractor, I was going to recommend a grab and go refractor to compliment your larger instruments, especially since it sounded like you were more burned out with work than astronomy.

I have a 20" dob (about as large as I can handle by myself at my age) kept at a dark site, but driving out there takes time, set up and collimation takes time and energy, and then there are cooling issues.

My 4" Tak doublet is much easier to set up and cools down in just a few minutes all year round.

Like you I still have work obligations and the weather frequently gives me partly cloudy nights (or cloudy nights with maybe a break for an hour or two of clear sky) and the 4" refractor lets me get some observing in on nights where work obligations or weather conditions would preclude observing with a larger scope.

I've been amazed what I can see with just 4" refractor under light polluted skies. Planets, double stars, carbon stars, open clusters, globular clusters, a few of the brighter planetary nebula and of course the Moon are my targets of choice for evenings at home. Last week after the moon set I was able to find M71 and to my surprise my little Tak was able to resolve it even with the light pollution of an urban back yard. Just last night I got a good view of Jupiter. Although I couldn't make out Europa in transit, many bands, two barges and the GRS were visible. Epsilon Lyra was easily split at 100x (never gets old). The Nova v1405 in Cassiopeia looks like its brightened to about mag 6 again, and I spent about an hour trying to learn some of the main features on the Moon. Perhaps not as exciting as tracking down an Abell Nebula in a big dob under dark skies but an enjoyable two hour observing session in the back yard with a small scope, with very little set up time.

And it's not like your 115mm refractor is going to lose value. So if you ever decide to sell it you can get your money back. I see no downside to the purchase.

Some of the older folk around here are going to recommend something smaller for grab and go, but at 36 you won't have any problem with setting up a 115mm quickly and with very little effort. I had about ten times as much strength and energy at 36 as I do now at 54. The advancing years and some health issues have slowed me down a bit. One reason I got back into astronomy two years ago, I suppose -- the amount of energy required for astronomy is much less than the hobbies I was pursuing at 36. "Once I moved about like the wind." Not anymore, but I can't complain. At least I'm still moving.

Yes even when your mind says you can still move heavier scopes around etc your body says otherwise.



#82 MarMax

MarMax

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,542
  • Joined: 27 May 2020
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 26 July 2021 - 12:27 AM

Depending on your storage space and access you can always go to wheels. My two grab and go scopes are the C11 and AT130. I can be set up and running in 15 minutes with either rig.

 

gallery_332504_14303_63998.jpg

 

gallery_332504_15525_49789.jpg


  • George N and LauraMS like this

#83 B. Hebert

B. Hebert

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 529
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2006
  • Loc: Southern California

Posted 26 July 2021 - 12:55 AM

This is an interesting and important topic.  Most of us are here because this is a hobby and not a life's work, but even in a life's work one topic can get boring (I am old enough to make a qualified statement).

 

Perhaps this is an aspect of the human mind.  We don't function in a steady state and we need constant change, not just to keep us interested, but down to a molecular level we process change and trying to maintain interest when we have aquired the informatin or skill we sought might be one of life's challenges.  Even in relationships monotony gets boring.

 

Eyesight is an example.  A toad, sitting on a ground sees nothing unless it moves - everything is black.  For a toad this isn't much of a problem.  If something big moves it is probably dangerous, if it is small it is probably food.  You can do this by focusing on one point and keeping your eyes and body completely still.  If you can maintain absolute stillness everything will go black.  We only see because our eyes are continuously in motion and our brain recreates the scene we see from the motion.

 

At a larger level we need constant change to maintain consciousness and interest.  Even in meditation, where one is holding still and (usually) concentrating only on breathing or a mantra or koan there must be some constant change for our minds to perceive reality, forming a "loop" of consciousness.

 

So, perhaps we need some way to constantly make our interst new and every changing.... like buying new equipment!


  • 25585, David Mercury and ayadai like this

#84 The Ardent

The Ardent

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 5,473
  • Joined: 24 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Virginia

Posted 26 July 2021 - 01:51 AM

I’m transcribing my written observing logs from last year into the PC spreadsheet. In Lyra alone I have 12.5 handwritten notebook pages of observations with my 18” NMT dob.  Each page is notes 15-25 individual targets. 
 

Observing is fun, going back and doing “work” isn’t . Especially since I can’t read my handwriting. Then I check each observation in SkySafari for accuracy. Is it Struve 2444 or 2449? UGC 11368 or 11371? I may have seen one and written down the other. That it’s a year later shows my aversion to constructive activity. 
 

Im going back to Lyra this summer with a 1968 vintage  8” f/4.5 Cave Newtonian I picked up dirt cheap in the classifieds. Here is a scope where the mirror, tube , and cell are  older than I am. An excellent mirror from what I can tell. Its awe inspiring to use this ancient artifact, although I don’t think Cave envisioned  a Paracorr and 2” Ethos 17mm eyepiece. 
 

The last time I used a Newtonian on EQ mount it didn’t go well because the tripod was too tall and too heavy for comfortable portable use. Here the short and lightweight pier is the right height for seated observing. 
 

Now why would I repeat observations with less aperture ? Because nobody in their right mind wants to look at HD 168693. Don’t waste your time. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 6067A341-CC06-4BFE-B40D-D4918694E330.jpeg

  • Tyson M likes this

#85 Javier1978

Javier1978

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,399
  • Joined: 12 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Posted 26 July 2021 - 08:59 AM

I think of my current stage of the hobby as "Calm Astronomy". While it is true that my enthusiast is not the same as it once was, I can now harvest the experience that came from the countless nights that I spent under the stars. Any clear night, I can set up my dob in less than 5 minutes, find some showpiece targets in seconds, and roughly understand what I am observing. Even more, I can share my knowledge with others. How cool is that?

 

The future might or might not bring a renewed enthusiasm for astronomy, but I will always treasure what astronomy brought to my life.


Edited by Javier1978, 26 July 2021 - 08:59 AM.

  • weis14 and Stardust Dave like this

#86 rajilina

rajilina

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 289
  • Joined: 25 Jul 2019
  • Loc: UT, USA

Posted 26 July 2021 - 09:55 AM

 

There's so much to do, see, and experience in this world, that even when I find something I love to do, there's a small part of me looking for the next thing to experience. When I move on from a hobby it's never a permanent good-bye, I know I'll be back, I just need to explore the next new thing I'm hooked on. And that's OK. 

This is me. I've gone through geocaching, dressmaking, hatmaking, embroidery, pysanky, stained glass, dancing, skating/skiing, trap shooting, cowboy action shooting, and a bunch of other hobbies and interests, as well as astronomy. I get bored of doing the same thing over and over though, and I find that I move through these hobbies as they interest me and drop them again when they don't. But fundamentally, I love all of them, and I know they will always come back around at some point... as you said, never a permanent goodbye. 


  • csa/montana and George N like this

#87 George N

George N

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,441
  • Joined: 19 May 2006
  • Loc: Binghamton & Indian Lake NY

Posted 26 July 2021 - 10:10 AM

......

 

So, perhaps we need some way to constantly make our interst new and every changing.... like buying new equipment!

That's why I suggest trying several aspects of 'hobby astronomy' - like planetary imaging -- and if the planets are playing 'hard to get' - grab a pair of binoculars - even large ones on a mount - and scan for big clusters and nebulae - even under light polluted sky - or head to a quite dark-sky field with just a lounge chair 6th mag star map and watch for meteors while re-connecting with the sky "the ancients" saw and memorize the stars of those dim Constellations that you use to point to an area and say "something in there". Go bug scope owners at a club observing area for views and info - attend a big star party and haunt the 'talks'. Rotate between interests and it will remain fresh.

 

One example -- just last night it was 'clear' but hazy with one-day past full moon - not worth opening up my little observatory (had it open the night before) -- so I hauled my "mirrorless" on a tripod outside to grab images of the rising moon, Jupiter, and Saturn over the tree line. They came out nice.



#88 Messyone

Messyone

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,772
  • Joined: 02 May 2012

Posted 26 July 2021 - 05:28 PM

Hello, 

 

I have been through this.., 

 

I took a break for ~3 years from the hobby (work, life etc) and marginally got back into observing (I'm visual-only and have only ever been interested in DSOs) but I guess since my now being split between the US and the UK, my observing time was nowhere near what it was like before. 

 

As for my participation on CN, I have to say - things seem different here and not in a good way.., As a result, I do not wish to post (nor bother to read beyond titles of) nor respond in most cases. Not wanting to take away from your post, so I'll leave that alone. 

 

What does help is the awareness of the need to actually maintain the equipment, so I do get motivated every now and then after spending time working on the mounts, OTAs and eyepieces - there's nothing quite like the feeling I get when mucking around with scopes, eyepieces and mounts that will get my motivation levels up.., 

 

So not quite "bigger" nor would I call it "better", but the fact that I actually go out every now and then ==> progress in my book.., 

 

Best.., 

 

skybsd 

Sums me up too. I didn't look through a scope for three + years and didn't miss it. My main interest is in ATMing not in the actual use. 

I recently put my 6" f12 and ATM pillow block mount up for sale here in Australia...got a few bites but withdrew the sale as it was actually enjoyable to use it, even though I got it working to do a facetime call with a potential buyer. 

I sold my 'good' stuff a few years ago too...now have cheap but good which suits fine. 

As for CN I agree with skybsd that things are different. Too much 'social media' type of thing.

My 'real' hobby is cycling....gotta go and get on zwift.



#89 pointedstick

pointedstick

    Explorer 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 75
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2021
  • Loc: New Mexico

Posted 27 July 2021 - 06:57 PM

Hah, you're like the opposite of me. I'd been a Warhammer 40K hobbyist for a very long time but 8th and 9th editions just didn't sit right with me--the game simply felt wrong compared to how it was before. And having lost my local circle of 40K gamer friends, I turned to the wider community and didn't really click with anyone else involved in it. I'd been feeling exactly the same things you're feeling now about astronomy. For me, astronomy was the hobby lifeline, entering my life just when another hobby was disappointingly winding down.

The obvious solution of course is for us to trade 40K stuff for astro equipment.lol.gif


  • Gregg Carter likes this

#90 alphatripleplus

alphatripleplus

    World Controller

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 125,336
  • Joined: 09 Mar 2012
  • Loc: Georgia

Posted 28 July 2021 - 10:28 AM

 

 

Even with the incredible power of EAA my interest still waned. For most of late 2020 and early 2021 I've been playing multiplayer video games(Sea of Thieves) with friends. It has been a great supplement to offset the isolation of the pandemic. At times I did feel a little guilty playing on clear moonless nights, but it was a lot of fun and I don't regret it, the stars aren't going anywhere.  

 

I'm just now starting to come out from under my rock and getting back into EAA and visual astronomy. Just like clockwork, the cycle goes on. 

Glad that you are  coming back. Sometimes it feels good to ease back into a groove, after taking a holiday.


  • cmooney91 likes this

#91 MeridianStarGazer

MeridianStarGazer

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,737
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 28 July 2021 - 11:28 PM

A large portion of me has considered astronomy my primary life's interest, particularly for the past decade.  Whether it was learning about cosmology by reading various books, to the journey of trying many different telescopes and designs, to simply enjoying the solace that the night sky brings me the odd time I get to go out and escape the every day hustle and bustle I am so used to.  The hobby and knowledge base of astronomy has brought me order and structure to my life and even purpose.  It helped bring me out of the darkest period of my life, and to focus on something.  That new-found focus evolved into small life goals setting, and eventually life changes which has changed me for the better.

 

...

 

I have amazing telescopes which I will keep and love to use, when I get to use them. I rarely get to use them and I found myself daydreaming about astronomy more than anything. Ever-spending money on new ways to help me enjoy it more. I do not need to spend much more money at all, although the astro list still has some "nice to have or try" items on it: a small grab and go refractor for the backyard in winter, night vision, and to finish up an observatory of some kind.  Although I don't want to spend a great deal of money on it as long as it functions as I need it to.

 

...

 

I find myself always having very little amounts of free time anyways, especially with the limited amount of days off I have been having.  I've worked more days than I have ever in my life this year with overtime, bought a house, a new vehicle, ect.  

 

Anyways, my astro hobby interest is waning and I feel guilt over it. I think my lack of free time this year has had a part in this waning interest and not getting out as much as I'd like.  

 

...

 

Of course any clear night I will use my telescopes, as this is like a mini-vacation for me when doing so. But no longer a clear day or night is this the ONLY thing I have to look forward to hobby-wise. It certainly makes it easier on me when the clear sky chart is wrong and my plans are foiled yet again.  I get a bit upset when that happens.

 

I have read countless other threads here on CN of people saying the exact same thing I am saying above, and I told myself it would never happen to me.  Now I can see why others recommend getting into another hobby, as astronomy as an only hobby is in itself- not sustainable or an exercise in frustration.

...

How much of your burn out is from gear being too much work to bring outside for the view you get, and how much is just too much professional work or skies that are not clear?

 

If you had a fast set up observatory to block neighbor lights, would that make you more likely to view?

If you had larger aperture that is lighter, would that get you viewing much more?

The fact you have time to play video games tells me that your professional time is not the main driver, though it can make you miss a few good nights. Poor skies seems like a bigger reason, which is why the gaming is more consistent. For me, instead of gaming, I just post on CN.

 

 

Do you feel there is anything that vendors could carry or scope designers could build differently that would get people to observe more and be less likely to leave the hobby? I know some people are using electronic assisted viewing. Maybe the price on that needs to come down.



#92 Tyson M

Tyson M

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 6,070
  • Joined: 22 Jan 2015
  • Loc: Canada

Posted 29 July 2021 - 12:27 AM

How much of your burn out is from gear being too much work to bring outside for the view you get, and how much is just too much professional work or skies that are not clear?

 

If you had a fast set up observatory to block neighbor lights, would that make you more likely to view?

If you had larger aperture that is lighter, would that get you viewing much more?

The fact you have time to play video games tells me that your professional time is not the main driver, though it can make you miss a few good nights. Poor skies seems like a bigger reason, which is why the gaming is more consistent. For me, instead of gaming, I just post on CN.

 

 

Do you feel there is anything that vendors could carry or scope designers could build differently that would get people to observe more and be less likely to leave the hobby? I know some people are using electronic assisted viewing. Maybe the price on that needs to come down.

I don't play video games.  I am starting a wargame with plastic miniatures to paint and eventually play on table tops.

 

I think the main issue has been too much professional work and the scopes being a lot of work on nights with not a lot of time to observe. I rectified the latter issue with a 115mm grab and go.  Went out last night caught Jupiter for about 10 mins but clouds ruined my night.

 

An observatory will certainly help.  I have a pier coming to me soon.


  • MeridianStarGazer likes this

#93 The Ardent

The Ardent

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 5,473
  • Joined: 24 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Virginia

Posted 29 July 2021 - 01:43 AM

Astronomy we can see into the past , and pier into the future.

#94 havasman

havasman

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 13,095
  • Joined: 04 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Dallas, Texas

Posted 29 July 2021 - 01:54 AM

I think the main issue has been too much professional work and the scopes being a lot of work on nights with not a lot of time to observe. I rectified the latter issue with a 115mm grab and goWent out last night caught Jupiter for about 10 mins but clouds ruined my night.

 

An observatory will certainly help I have a pier coming to me soon.

waytogo.gif waytogo.gif



#95 Ron-Fr

Ron-Fr

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 84
  • Joined: 05 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Way too close to Paris, France

Posted 29 July 2021 - 04:58 PM

 

I can't help but feel a bit ashamed to be no longer thinking about astronomy 24/7.  

You are being ashamed to be no longer victim of a hobby burnout it seems to me...



#96 csrlice12

csrlice12

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 28,824
  • Joined: 22 May 2012
  • Loc: Denver, CO

Posted 30 July 2021 - 10:10 AM

Retirement....life's BIG gamechanger


  • Bill Jensen, BRCoz, doctordub and 2 others like this

#97 George N

George N

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,441
  • Joined: 19 May 2006
  • Loc: Binghamton & Indian Lake NY

Posted 01 August 2021 - 01:08 PM

.......

 

Do you feel there is anything that vendors could carry or scope designers could build differently that would get people to observe more and be less likely to leave the hobby? I know some people are using electronic assisted viewing. Maybe the price on that needs to come down.

Over the past dozen years we've seen the 'rise of the small APO' - a good thing - especially when deployed as a 'grab-n-go' set-up. There has also been improved small-scope imaging gear. One nice thing about "imaging" -- 2/3 of the 'effort' is processing on a computer - that can be done on those snowy nights or rainy Saturday afternoons - and with access to the 'net to learn more about the subject - and then posting the image for discussion with friends. From what I've seen just this year at dark sky sites - it is becoming the most popular part of the hobby.

 

We have seen the coming of the 'compact' and light-weight Dob with fast enough optics that 'the ladder' can become a thing of the past - but at least the commercial versions have not (yet) addressed set-up time. In some ways these newer Dobs are more complex to assemble.

 

        >> My personal solution is an on-order 20" F/3.5 NMT Dob that I intend to keep fully assembled - ready to push 15 feet to the observing area - tweak collimation - observe - if it starts snowing - push it back in the house. However, it is not an inexpensive telescope. Even assembly is an easy 3 to 5 minute exercise. <<

 

I would like to see better quality small alt/az mounts for 'grab & go' scopes and binoculars. I love to use my 20x80 binoculars nearly as much and imaging gear or 20" Dob - especially under dark sky - but my parallelogram binocular mount can be a pain - not with assembly and use - be dealing with an awkward-to-move contraption to drag around in the dark. I've thought of installing a permanent post in the yard and at 'the lake' that would eliminate at least the tripod part -- and my parallelogram mount is rust-proof - so I just leave the thing out in the rain at times - no issues.


Edited by George N, 01 August 2021 - 01:08 PM.

  • Tyson M likes this

#98 ayadai

ayadai

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 725
  • Joined: 01 Feb 2021
  • Loc: Northern Mariana Islands, Micronesia

Posted 01 August 2021 - 05:56 PM

I would like to see better quality small alt/az mounts for 'grab & go' scopes and binoculars...

For binoculars (including my very weighty Celestron Sky Master Pro 20x80; yeah, go ahead and scoff) I use an Orion Precision Slow-Motion Adapter (yeah, go ahead and scoff some more) on top of a ball head on my Manfrotto element tripod. I've tried fluid heads, pan/tilt heads and ball heads and this combo is far and above IMHO. Precise, fast, lightweight, very inexpensive, durable, easy to use and no setup. I like it so much, I bought another to mount on my venerable Velbon tripod.



#99 Gregg Carter

Gregg Carter

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 152
  • Joined: 10 Aug 2010
  • Loc: Northern New Mexico

Posted 01 August 2021 - 07:50 PM

I don't play video games.  I am starting a wargame with plastic miniatures to paint and eventually play on table tops.

 

I think the main issue has been too much professional work and the scopes being a lot of work on nights with not a lot of time to observe. I rectified the latter issue with a 115mm grab and go.  Went out last night caught Jupiter for about 10 mins but clouds ruined my night.

 

An observatory will certainly help.  I have a pier coming to me soon.

  Which wargame?



#100 Mrcloc

Mrcloc

    Vendor - SvBony Eyepieces

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 211
  • Joined: 19 Jun 2020
  • Loc: Pretoria, South Africa

Posted 02 August 2021 - 10:32 AM

 

you can't have too many hobbies

I think I do... :)

 

Seriously though, I took a short hiatus when babies came along. Then my daughter did space in school, and I got the ol' scope out, and now I've built a tripod, bought new eyepieces, started a shop so that people aren't scared out of the hobby. I feel guilty these days when I want to go look at something, but I'm tired from really busy work days, and so I rather fall asleep or play StarCraft or something. But these tiring times will pass, and my awake excitedness will last to the dark night, and I will again look up more regularly (I mean, once a week isn't regular enough for me).

 

I think the most important thing here is that the best telescope is the one you use. Having a 16" cat which hangs around in the living room isn't going to be easy to use. It's the same sentiment I had when trading my 8" dob for a 5" mak. The mak got a lot more use because it was easier and more fun. (Now it'll be easy to use the 8", so I'm going to get one when I can, but that's not the point).

 

Enjoy the games. The stars aren't going anywhere (at least, that's the theory; these days anything's possible).


  • weis14 likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics