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The 127mm Synta Mak - a little scope that CAN!

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#1 maroubra_boy

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 07:05 PM

Hi all,

 

I picked up for myself a little 127mm Synta made Mak not too long ago.  The brand name is of no consequence as Synta is the OEM to many different brands not only for which it is the parent company of but to many others.  And this little scope is available in many different flavours...

 

What was of most importance to me though was figuring out just how good this scope was.  Granted, it is just one random sample, but a good place to start all the same.

 

To begin with, I did compare it side by side with a C5.  The C5 was collimated to as good as it could be (I take my time with collimation and know how to work with mirror shift with this).  The Mak was straight out of the box and did need some collimation tweaking, but I couldn't wait to do a first up drag race.  Even though the Mak was running a little rough, it left the C5 for dead.

 

Acclimating?  Not a problem as both scopes were insulated so this was not a point of contention.

 

Eyepieces and diagonal?  The same diagonal was swapped between the two scopes and the same eyepieces used (yes the Mak has a slightly longer fl), but also compared at as close to the same magnification as I could get between them.

 

With all of this and the Mak not being collimated to its best, the Mak just left the C5 in its wake for clarity, focus and resolution.

 

Next was collimating the scope and pushing it to what it can really do.  And Oh My!  This baby can swing!

 

The scope does show some mirror shift.  Not a major problem and it can be worked with.  I'd rather not see mirror shift but this is how Synta does things.

 

Ok, now that it was collimated until I had it squealing the time came to thrash it.  My first test was splitting a couple of double star systems.  First up was Pi Lupi, a 1.6" pair of similar magnitude - Check!  An easy split.  Not especially testing for this aperture, but the quality of the image and spacing was really lovely.  Next was Antares, wider than Pi Lupi but the magnitude difference makes it a contrast test - Check!  This is not a scope I would be using to go splitting double stars myself as I have 9" Santel Mak that I would use for such an exercise, but this little scope has shown itself to be capable all the same.

 

The last test in the reckoning was to spot the trio of craters Armstrong, Collins and Aldrin.  The old orange tube C8 I had struggled to show them even under very good seeing conditions, the brand new Meade 8" SCT (brand new in 2017) I had totally failed to show them, the C5 just managed to show Armstrong, and this 127 Mak had no problem with the trio in just good seeing conditions.  WOOHOO!!  dancey.gif   Now here is a mass production scope that is really VERY good.

 

The 9" Santel shows much smaller craters around Aldrin and Collins, but this is a different beast.

 

I picked up this 127mm Mak as a grab'n'go for myself and for sidewalk astronomy, and I am really, happy with it.  Astonished actually.

 

No need to show what this Mak looks like - there is nothing unique about the appearance of this Synta Mak that isn't already available as an image on the Net.  The insulation wrap I made for it is from a sheet of Coreflute that I salvaged from the last local election that was being used as an advertising placard, costing me nix smile.gif .  But I did go to town on decorating it as it was a blank canvas that was goading me to take to it...  lol.gif  I will be most disappointed if the girls and boys in Blue are not called on me especially with the flashing LED I've put in it laugh.gif  I have also added a fan to the dewshield end of the wrap as this simple addition keeps the corrector nice and dry from dew - the flap that the fan sits under can be seen in the pic showing the LED light.

 

The last pic I took with an Oppo phone the other night, handheld, with a Prostar 20mm 68° eyepiece.  It is not the best photo of the Moon, but for a single frame point and shoot I think it is pretty good.  I can't wait to see what I can do using a smartphone adapter with this scope!  And as for more orthodox AP at least of the Moon and planets, I have to see if I go there with it - I kinda do like what the Santel does too... lol.gif

 

Thanks for reading my review,

 

Alex.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 127 Mak wrap (1) - Copy.jpg
  • 20210626_184302-1 - Copy.jpg
  • IMG_20210718_173254-1 - Copy.jpg

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#2 Maritime

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 07:25 PM

I infer this is the same as a Celestron 127slt, which I love and will never sell. 


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#3 maroubra_boy

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 07:29 PM

Yes, that is one of the many flavours this little Mak comes in :)



#4 rblackadar

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 07:41 PM

 

I will be most disappointed if the girls and boys in Blue are not called on me especially with the flashing LED I've put in it 

Not to mention all of that sinister-looking russkiy you put on it.

 

How did you do the graphics? It looks printed. Very nice job in any case.


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#5 Jethro7

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 07:48 PM

 

 

Acclimating?  Not a problem as both scopes were insulated so this was not a point of contention.

 

 

Hello Alex,

Thanks for the mini revue. I have not owned a MAK yet but I do want to get one at some point.You really can not get the whole picture just viewing through a scope at a Star party.

You really need to own one and live with it for a while before you can pass judgment upon it.

 

Reflectix is a cheap and very effective solution to the temperture acclimation problem. 

 

HAPPY SKIES TO YOU AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro


Edited by Jethro7, 19 July 2021 - 07:56 PM.

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#6 maroubra_boy

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 07:49 PM

Thanks!

 

Not printed.  Hand drawn using permanent markers/Sharpies laugh.gif

 

And yes, a bit of thought went into the design :lol:  I had the scope out in the front yard the same day as the lunar pic above - I got many a concerned look! :lol:  and no one was brave enough to ask what I was doing!

Attached Thumbnails

  • 127 Mak wrap (2) - Copy.jpg
  • 127 Mak wrap (3) - Copy.jpg

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#7 gene 4181

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 07:51 PM

 Has the air  inlet  of a Vought F 8 Crusader smile.gif


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#8 maroubra_boy

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 07:58 PM

 Has the air  inlet  of a Vought F 8 Crusader smile.gif

I looked at many different livery designs for inspiration, the Crusader was one of them!  The Phantom was another, as was the Atlas rocket, F-14, F-18 and the Tornado.  Delved a little into sci-fi too.



#9 teashea

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 07:58 PM

Hi all,

 

I picked up for myself a little 127mm Synta made Mak not too long ago.  The brand name is of no consequence as Synta is the OEM to many different brands not only for which it is the parent company of but to many others.  And this little scope is available in many different flavours...

 

What was of most importance to me though was figuring out just how good this scope was.  Granted, it is just one random sample, but a good place to start all the same.

 

To begin with, I did compare it side by side with a C5.  The C5 was collimated to as good as it could be (I take my time with collimation and know how to work with mirror shift with this).  The Mak was straight out of the box and did need some collimation tweaking, but I couldn't wait to do a first up drag race.  Even though the Mak was running a little rough, it left the C5 for dead.

 

Acclimating?  Not a problem as both scopes were insulated so this was not a point of contention.

 

Eyepieces and diagonal?  The same diagonal was swapped between the two scopes and the same eyepieces used (yes the Mak has a slightly longer fl), but also compared at as close to the same magnification as I could get between them.

 

With all of this and the Mak not being collimated to its best, the Mak just left the C5 in its wake for clarity, focus and resolution.

 

Next was collimating the scope and pushing it to what it can really do.  And Oh My!  This baby can swing!

 

The scope does show some mirror shift.  Not a major problem and it can be worked with.  I'd rather not see mirror shift but this is how Synta does things.

 

Ok, now that it was collimated until I had it squealing the time came to thrash it.  My first test was splitting a couple of double star systems.  First up was Pi Lupi, a 1.6" pair of similar magnitude - Check!  An easy split.  Not especially testing for this aperture, but the quality of the image and spacing was really lovely.  Next was Antares, wider than Pi Lupi but the magnitude difference makes it a contrast test - Check!  This is not a scope I would be using to go splitting double stars myself as I have 9" Santel Mak that I would use for such an exercise, but this little scope has shown itself to be capable all the same.

 

The last test in the reckoning was to spot the trio of craters Armstrong, Collins and Aldrin.  The old orange tube C8 I had struggled to show them even under very good seeing conditions, the brand new Meade 8" SCT (brand new in 2017) I had totally failed to show them, the C5 just managed to show Armstrong, and this 127 Mak had no problem with the trio in just good seeing conditions.  WOOHOO!!  dancey.gif   Now here is a mass production scope that is really VERY good.

 

The 9" Santel shows much smaller craters around Aldrin and Collins, but this is a different beast.

 

I picked up this 127mm Mak as a grab'n'go for myself and for sidewalk astronomy, and I am really, happy with it.  Astonished actually.

 

No need to show what this Mak looks like - there is nothing unique about the appearance of this Synta Mak that isn't already available as an image on the Net.  The insulation wrap I made for it is from a sheet of Coreflute that I salvaged from the last local election that was being used as an advertising placard, costing me nix smile.gif .  But I did go to town on decorating it as it was a blank canvas that was goading me to take to it...  lol.gif  I will be most disappointed if the girls and boys in Blue are not called on me especially with the flashing LED I've put in it laugh.gif  I have also added a fan to the dewshield end of the wrap as this simple addition keeps the corrector nice and dry from dew - the flap that the fan sits under can be seen in the pic showing the LED light.

 

The last pic I took with an Oppo phone the other night, handheld, with a Prostar 20mm 68° eyepiece.  It is not the best photo of the Moon, but for a single frame point and shoot I think it is pretty good.  I can't wait to see what I can do using a smartphone adapter with this scope!  And as for more orthodox AP at least of the Moon and planets, I have to see if I go there with it - I kinda do like what the Santel does too... lol.gif

 

Thanks for reading my review,

 

Alex.

creative graphics


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#10 pointedstick

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 07:59 PM

What was the collimation process like, if you don't mind sharing?



#11 aa6ww

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 08:18 PM

I have a few questions because I also regularly observe Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins craters and it's pretty fun locating them.

 

1. What eyepieces did you use to see the 3 craters.

2. Were any of them more difficult to see then the others?

3. What magnifications did you use to pull all 3 out? 

 

 

Also.

 

 4. What objects did look at that made the C5 left for dead?

 5. What was the magnifications of both scopes.

 6. How did these objects differ in how you saw them in each scope? 

 7. Did you have both scopes on a side by side set up or were there two different mounts?

 8. What was the temperatures these observations took place in.

 

 Finally, how long were you out that night. 

 Sounds like you are having a blast with your new scope.

 You've inspired me to search for them, in addition to the other Apollo landing sites again.

 

 ...Ralph

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acclimating?  Not a problem as both scopes were insulated so this was not a point of contention.

 

Eyepieces and diagonal?  The same diagonal was swapped between the two scopes and the same eyepieces used (yes the Mak has a slightly longer fl), but also compared at as close to the same magnification as I could get between them.

 

With all of this and the Mak not being collimated to its best, the Mak just left the C5 in its wake for clarity, focus and resolution.

 

Next was collimating the scope and pushing it to what it can really do.  And Oh My!  This baby can swing!

 

The scope does show some mirror shift.  Not a major problem and it can be worked with.  I'd rather not see mirror shift but this is how Synta does things.

 

Ok, now that it was collimated until I had it squealing the time came to thrash it.  My first test was splitting a couple of double star systems.  First up was Pi Lupi, a 1.6" pair of similar magnitude - Check!  An easy split.  Not especially testing for this aperture, but the quality of the image and spacing was really lovely.  Next was Antares, wider than Pi Lupi but the magnitude difference makes it a contrast test - Check!  This is not a scope I would be using to go splitting double stars myself as I have 9" Santel Mak that I would use for such an exercise, but this little scope has shown itself to be capable all the same.

 

The last test in the reckoning was to spot the trio of craters Armstrong, Collins and Aldrin.  The old orange tube C8 I had struggled to show them even under very good seeing conditions, the brand new Meade 8" SCT (brand new in 2017) I had totally failed to show them, the C5 just managed to show Armstrong, and this 127 Mak had no problem with the trio in just good seeing conditions.  WOOHOO!!  dancey.gif   Now here is a mass production scope that is really VERY good.

 

The 9" Santel shows much smaller craters around Aldrin and Collins, but this is a different beast.

 

I picked up this 127mm Mak as a grab'n'go for myself and for sidewalk astronomy, and I am really, happy with it.  Astonished actually.

 

No need to show what this Mak looks like - there is nothing unique about the appearance of this Synta Mak that isn't already available as an image on the Net.  The insulation wrap I made for it is from a sheet of Coreflute that I salvaged from the last local election that was being used as an advertising placard, costing me nix smile.gif .  But I did go to town on decorating it as it was a blank canvas that was goading me to take to it...  lol.gif  I will be most disappointed if the girls and boys in Blue are not called on me especially with the flashing LED I've put in it laugh.gif  I have also added a fan to the dewshield end of the wrap as this simple addition keeps the corrector nice and dry from dew - the flap that the fan sits under can be seen in the pic showing the LED light.

 

The last pic I took with an Oppo phone the other night, handheld, with a Prostar 20mm 68° eyepiece.  It is not the best photo of the Moon, but for a single frame point and shoot I think it is pretty good.  I can't wait to see what I can do using a smartphone adapter with this scope!  And as for more orthodox AP at least of the Moon and planets, I have to see if I go there with it - I kinda do like what the Santel does too... lol.gif

 

Thanks for reading my review,

 

Alex.



#12 kel123

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 08:18 PM

Great review.
You can also adapt it to use SCT or 2 inch accessories with a mak to SCT adapter sold by a couple of vendors.

The least expensive I have seen is this one at just $5 at aliexpress.

https://a.aliexpress.com/_mrtoytp

I wouldn't say I know why others sell it for almost $30. Probably cheaper labor somewhere but the difference is just much. I ordered one myself but it is still in transit.

Enjoy your new scope.

#13 maroubra_boy

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 08:20 PM

Pointedstick,

 

The collimation process I used was the one in the link below.  I used high magnification for the process and a tracking mount.  The tracking is for convenience:

 

https://www.manualsl...?page=31#manual

 

HOWEVER, what the manual does not say is that the collimation process is a two step doughnut process:

 

1,  The first is by using a large doughnut - this is for gross collimation.  This is because as the symmetry of the doughnut is brought in, whatever errors remain are evened out because of the large shape.

 

2,  The second is with a very small doughnut - this is for fine collimation.

 

The other thing that the manual does not mention is that with a scope that shows mirror shift, you CANNOT collimate both inside and outside of focus.  Well, you can, but I say it this way because you need to get into the habit of focusing by moving the focus knob ONLY in one direction.  If you go too far past focus you wind back through focus and then ONLY wind back in the original direction to focus.  The way I do it is I wind counter-clockwise to focus.  If I go past focus then I wind back clockwise and then back counter-clockwise.  This puts the mirror back into the same position.  With collimation you need to do the same - wind in one direction to get your doughnut, say for your large doughnut, then do a minor adjustment as if you were focusing - you will still have you large doughnut, but the mirror is placed into the exact same position as if you were actually focusing.  You do exactly the same with the small doughnut.

 

Only this way will you be putting the mirror back into the same place each time and optimising the collimation conditions for the scope.  Do this with any scope that shows mirror shift, be it a Mak or SCT.

 

Alex.


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#14 erin

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 08:35 PM

Alex, awesome artwork! I enjoy re-painting my scopes, but what you did takes the cake waytogo.gif

 

I just picked up a 102 Synta Mak and love it! Thanks for the review. I will have to go looking for those craters.


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#15 Cali

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 08:41 PM

Great review.
You can also adapt it to use SCT or 2 inch accessories with a mak to SCT adapter sold by a couple of vendors.

The least expensive I have seen is this one at just $5 at aliexpress.

https://a.aliexpress.com/_mrtoytp

I wouldn't say I know why others sell it for almost $30. Probably cheaper labor somewhere but the difference is just much. I ordered one myself but it is still in transit.

Enjoy your new scope.

Please let us know how things work out after you install the adapter.

 

- Cal



#16 maroubra_boy

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 08:53 PM

Ralph,

 

I'll take each Q. in turn.

 

1,  If you are asking what brand, then irrelevant.  More important is the consistency of quality.  If you are using modest eyepieces, then that is what you are using in both scopes.  Likewise with better EPs.  If you have a mix, then you can test more thoroughly.  Using the same EPs in both scopes also helps even out aspects such as hue influence by the individual eyepieces - some EPs give a more yellow tint to the image, others more white.  Also evens out contrast issues.

 

What is important is high magnification and GOOD seeing conditions.  If seeing is not good or great, then you will have no chance.  For what its worth, the longest EP I saw the trio with was a 9mm under good seeing conditions.

 

2,  Armstrong is the largest of the trio and easiest to see, followed by Collins and them Aldrin.

 

3,  As with Q1, a 9mm gives 167X with this scope - surprisingly low magnification, but as I mentioned in my OP, the C8 struggled to show them and this was at 400X, and the Meade failed altogether.  But it is not an easy task to see them at 167X.  It is actually very difficult.  What makes things easier for me is I know where these three craters are and I can locate them very easily.  A 6mm EP showed them a little more easily.

 

4,  It was the Moon & Omega Centauri.  Contrast, focus and resolution capability.

 

5,  As mentioned in Q1, I used the same EPs in both scopes and tried different EPs to get the same magnification in both - I have many eyepieces.  I used different magnifications as well from low though to high to get the best feel of each scope.

 

6,  See point 4.  In a nutshell though, the image was softer in the C5.

 

7,  Side by side on different mounts.  Not relevant how though.  More important is making sure that the scopes are compared under the same conditions.

 

8,  Temperature - irrelevant.  More important here is seeing conditions and quality of transparency - these also need to be the same for both scopes, so can only be at the same time.

 

(9),  No idea.  I guess at least a couple of hours.  It was on the same night with a young phase Moon so it was very far away from Omega Centauri.  There were MANY changes of eyepieces and swapping of diagonals, and a lot of toing and froing.  "Did I see this" or "****!  What was I looking at"... you get the picture.  The majority of the time though was spent verifying the appearance of the crater trio.

 

Like I said in my OP, seeing needs to be good to very blooming good to see this trio.  They are a high magnification prospect.  The Moon also needs to be nearly at 1st quarter or soon after 1st quarter phase in order to have any chance of seeing them.  This is important too with them.  And it is exciting to chase them! :)  The neat thing about this trio is they are also very close to the Apollo 11 landing site.  And no, you cannot see the flag! :lol:  Crater Aldrin is 2.5km in diameter and difficult to spot.  The flag then, no chance...

 

This trio certainly makes for a good initial test of optics if your scope is 5" or larger.  A good 4" may be able to show Armstrong - you can only try.  Would be good to hear about what the smallest aperture someone has seen this trio with or if only Armstrong (which is the largest at 4.6km diameter).

 

Alex.


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#17 kel123

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Posted 19 July 2021 - 08:53 PM

Please let us know how things work out after you install the adapter.

- Cal


Sure

#18 Cali

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 06:04 AM

I picked up one of these for my 127mm Mak and it turned it into a whole new instrument regarding local orbs.

 

- Cal



#19 Brollen

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 09:57 AM

This is an interesting read for me as I've had probably 3 of these Synta 127mm MCTs ( 1 Celestron & 2 Orion) over the years - all were quite good and the most recent one I sold was no exception. I think the 127mm model hits a sweet spot in terms of size, weight and capability. But I did sell the last one off a few months back and opted for an older white-bodied C5 - an object of desire for some time.

 

The C5 has charmed me - great form factor and build quality while being lighter and smaller than the 127mm MCT - and possibly a slightly larger aperture hmm.gif . My scope, with Starbright coatings, is quite good. It did need collimation when I received it and since that it has been very good. I had very impressive views of the moon at medium & high power soon after receiving it and its stellar views are very satisfying. I have it paired with an AT70ED and the two play very well together on a single mount. Super light, out the door, etc.

 

Regarding the C5 vs. the 127mm MCT, its very close possibly the edge going to the MCT on sharpness alone. But this older C5 is very impressive overall - and being 2-3 pounds lighter and a bit shorter, to me it's a worthy tradeoff.

 

Clear skies!


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#20 Bill Barlow

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 10:50 AM

I would like to try a 5” MAK but the extra two pounds weight over the C5 meant I couldn’t use it on my light altaz mount.  The C5 I got through Company 7 has exceptionally sharp optics, maybe the best I have seen from a SCT.  It seems I am looking through a 4” Tak fluorite doublet but at a longer focal length.  Alex, I would put my C5 against your 5MAK anytime but since you live halfway around the world from me, not going to happen.  But glad you got an excellent optical sample.  I’m sure there are exceptionally good optical samples of mass produced SCT’s and MAK’s but getting one is the luck of the draw it seems.
 

I have also tried to view the Armstrong, Collins and Aldrin craters at first quarter moon a few times but have only seen Armstrong in my 8” ACF Meade.  I will try again when it cools off a bit and use the C5 or the C6-which also has excellent optical quality.  
 

Bill



#21 lakeorion

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 11:11 AM

Never selling my 127 Mak.  It's primarily used for outreach now, if I'm going to do a visual night I'll pull out the 180 Mak.

 

I know when I have a keeper during a large public event and several people comment, "That's the clearest picture I've seen all night" after walking through a field of 50 scopes.



#22 aa6ww

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 12:48 PM

Thank you Alex for the details on your response to my questions.

Two years ago during the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing, I created this thread on observing the Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins craters.

 

I think everyone here will find this interesting:

 

https://www.cloudyni...ollins-craters/

 

This is definitely one of the better threads I have started out here, which at the time two years ago, created lots of excitement because of the 50th Anniversary of the first lunar landing.

 

Thanks again for sparking my interest in Observing Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins craters and other Lunar landing sites.

 

...Ralph


Edited by aa6ww, 21 July 2021 - 09:24 AM.

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#23 aa6ww

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 12:55 PM

I also have an extremely sharp C5 SCT. Its my 3rd one and the best of the 3. I have a C6 also but I seem to always prefer the C5 over the C6, especially now that I am using it on my Skywatcher AZ-GTi mount. My focuser is buttery smooth with zero image shift.

I plan to use it this weekend for the first time with my Televue Binoviewer.

 

I've always been very interested in Skywatchers largest Mak, their 180 F/15. I may explore this an an option soon, despite having a similar size C8HD, C11 and 6" APO.

 

..Ralph

 

I would like to try a 5” MAK but the extra two pounds weight over the C5 meant I couldn’t use it on my light altaz mount.  The C5 I got through Company 7 has exceptionally sharp optics, maybe the best I have seen from a SCT.  It seems I am looking through a 4” Tak fluorite doublet but at a longer focal length.  Alex, I would put my C5 against your 5MAK anytime but since you live halfway around the world from me, not going to happen.  But glad you got an excellent optical sample.  I’m sure there are exceptionally good optical samples of mass produced SCT’s and MAK’s but getting one is the luck of the draw it seems.
 

I have also tried to view the Armstrong, Collins and Aldrin craters at first quarter moon a few times but have only seen Armstrong in my 8” ACF Meade.  I will try again when it cools off a bit and use the C5 or the C6-which also has excellent optical quality.  
 

Bill



#24 maroubra_boy

maroubra_boy

    Apollo

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 06:49 PM

The last C5 I had was able to show Armstrong.  I would have been happy to keep it just on that, but when the little Mak became available I couldn't resist a drag race between the two.  That C5 was good.  This 127mm Mak is better.  These Maks show that mass production techniques can reach a level of proficiency that can rival the very best boutique optics, even throwing up units to equal (whether manufacturers chose to improve things or not is a separate matter).  Thing is that I am also at a point in my experience that just accepting what is given to me is just not good enough.  It does take knowing what good optics are able to do to be able to distinguish between average and very good.  What I hope to do in part with this thread is offer a very easy test platform to start gauging the quality of the optics that reader have for themselves.

 

Reckon that your optics are hot stuff?  Then start with the Apollo 11 trio.  Here's a mass production 5" Mak that can show the three.  One brand new 8" SCT I had couldn't...

 

...

 

It is interesting that my thread should coincide with the 52nd anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing, and that the craters that now bear the names of the three astronauts should also be a testbed for telescopes.

 

On the topic of coincidence, I happened to be doing a sketch of the Moon the very night that turned out to be the last one for Niel Armstrong.  A "NO WAY!" bigshock.gif  moment for me when the sad news came through.  You know, one of those moments that you remember what you were doing when a monumental event takes place...

 

Alex.


Edited by maroubra_boy, 20 July 2021 - 07:04 PM.

  • alnitak22 and Jethro7 like this

#25 vtornado

vtornado

    Skylab

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 10:12 PM

Thanks Alex, I have similar findings.   My 127 synta is slightly sharper than my C5 (xlt version), but just by a little.

The C5 has a shorter focal length, and lighter so for some folks those advantages may tip the scale.




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