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A new star in NGC6951?

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#1 Eric B.

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 09:13 PM

Good evening,

 

First of all, I apologise for my poor english, I am a Frenchie form Normandie, homeland of snails and frogs because of the rain ! Thanks to Google's translate.

I am a regular on your site even if I do not write there. I learned a lot of things there and admired magnificent images. Mine not being by far as beautiful, I never saw fit to publish them.

I am 3/4 of a century old and am fairly "restored" by medical science which keeps me alive with scalpels and drugs, which does not simplify the practice of amateur astronomy. But I persist!

Now having trouble seeing through an eyepiece, I went back to astronomical photography. I live in the north of Rouen in what used to be the countryside and find myself increasingly eaten away by the city and its lights. There are only half a mile without lampposts between Monet's cathedral and my home ...

As summer has finally come to our region for a few days and we can see a few stars, I took the opportunity to portray galaxies and nebulae. However, trying to take NGC 6951, a little thing lost in the stars, I was amazed to find an additional star in  it. If this star is really in the galaxy and not in front of it, it's a hell of a supernova! Otherwise, I don't know what it is.

I compared my photo with many others on the net, none shows this strange supernumerary star.

I resumed my observation this evening, and the star is still there, apparently a little brighter even, but that may be due to better atmospheric transparency. I am at the limits of what my equipment can acquire. I deliberately did not process the image so that one can judge on the spot.

In your opinion, is it a supernova? In that case, it would be surprising if it hadn't already listed somewhere. I do not pretend to discover anything with a small telescope at the bottom of a garden.

Can you help me with your advice because I am very intrigued.

 

Thanks in advance and have a good starry night!

Eric

 

Ps : you will find the complete picture on my site here : http://dioptrique.in...51/ngc 6951.jpg


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#2 Eric B.

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 09:19 PM

Well, my picture desapeared ...

nova 1a

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#3 Dynan

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 09:21 PM

Denied permission to view the image. (Second post)

 

Can you indicate the star you are referring to?


Edited by Dynan, 20 July 2021 - 09:25 PM.


#4 MikeRatcliff

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 09:23 PM

Welcome to Cloudy Nights!

 

I am no expert. I found a website with currently listed supernovae, and there is one in NGC6951!   

 

https://www.rocheste.../supernova.html

 

They give the brightness (magnitude) and location of the SN. 

 

Mike

 

(You listed 6910 in your thread title but later said 6951)


Edited by MikeRatcliff, 20 July 2021 - 09:26 PM.

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#5 Eric B.

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 09:24 PM

Thank you, I'll correct it this after-noon. It's now 4h in the morning and the day is rising. I have to go to sleep quickly ! :)



#6 Eric B.

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 09:25 PM

Thank you, Mike !

You are wonderful on CN ! smile.gif



#7 SNH

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 10:09 PM

Okay, so Eric B. did photograph a supernova! It was in the 11th-magnitude barred spiral galaxy NGC 6951 in Cepheus. The supernova was first discovered on July 7th by by the ZTF and reached a peak magnitude of +15.9 on July 13th. As of July 16th, it was down to magnitude +16.4.

 

On the image below that Eric B. took, I have zoomed into the galaxy and labeled the supernova:

ngc 6951 Eric B.jpg

 

 

Scott


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#8 Creedence

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Posted 20 July 2021 - 10:39 PM

Congratulations Eric!  What an incredible independent discovery.  


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#9 Tyson M

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 01:56 AM

Moved to Scientific Amateur astronomy forum for a better fit. 



#10 Eric B.

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 11:28 AM

Thank you Scott ! But that is a matter of pure chance. My only merit was to check what I had taken. Not enough "shoot a line" ! wink.gif

And I am very proud of your compliments.

All my wishes for a beautiful starry night from a small village in upper Normandy.

Eric


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#11 dave253

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 06:39 PM

Well done, Eric! 



#12 godelescher

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 06:48 PM

Incredible. That's a once in a lifetime feeling: Seeing a new supernova and having it validated. Well done!


Edited by godelescher, 21 July 2021 - 06:48 PM.


#13 Eric B.

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 06:49 PM

Thank you Dave, dear colleague in music teaching ! I was a music teacher for many years, and I am a doctor in Musicology. I am a recorder player when I am not in my backyard for the night. let us be proud to be the distant descendants of William Herschel, the musician-astronomer of the king of england. He was, moreover, much better as a scientist than as a composer. His music is not worth much!

Best regards


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#14 Eric B.

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 06:57 PM

Oh no, Godelescher, somebody found it two weeks before me, as you can read it here. And yes, it's a lifetime feeling : one new star for more than 60 years looking at the sky. And I insist: it is a pure coincidence that I came across it. I just got lucky.

I hope you find the next !

Thank you for your kind message !!



#15 gwd

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 08:51 PM

Eric B. might enjoy being the person to update the wikipedia page for NGC 6951.  The last line in the article reads:

 

"Four supernovae have been observed in NGC 6951; SN 1999el (Type IIn, mag 15.4), SN 2000E (type Ia, mag 14.3), SN 2015G (type Ibn, mag 15.5),[13] and AT2016ejj (mag 16.0).[14][15]"

 

His supernova is 2021sjt 

 

https://www.rocheste...va.html#2021sjt


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#16 godelescher

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Posted 21 July 2021 - 10:07 PM

Eric,

I know someone else found it before you, but the incredible part is that you didn't know that, yet you found it anyway. I think that's a great accomplishment. It could just as easily been you who was credited with the discovery if it weren't for timing.
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#17 robin_astro

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Posted 22 July 2021 - 06:20 AM

It is a rather interesting unusual supernova, a type IIb.  Core collapse supernovae are normally either classified as type II showing Hydrogen in their spectra or type Ib/c with no Hydrogen where the outer layers of the progenitor star containing Hydrogen have been lost before the explosion. This one has apparently evolved from one to the other, the initial spectrum showing Hydrogen which later disappeared. It has therefore been reclassified as a type IIb

https://www.wis-tns.org/object/2021sjt

There is a brief description of type IIb supernovae here

https://link.springe...-662-55054-0_15

 

Cheers

Robin


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#18 Eric B.

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Posted 22 July 2021 - 03:25 PM

Thank you, Robin ! I'll go to read these links quickly. These spectro-analysis are very interesting, but my Ts 115 is far too small to study such faint stars.

Cheers

Eric



#19 Eric B.

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Posted Yesterday, 01:51 PM

Hello George,

I corrected Wikipedia : funny feeling !




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