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Differences between 10 and 12"

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#51 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 07:46 AM

I continue to see the same or similar statements about size and weight comparos in relation to observing areas.  In the case of the topic at hand, I'd much rather transport a 12" or 12.5" truss assembly in my SUV than a 10" f5 tube. The latter is bulky and therefore a handfull while a truss assembly can be easily disassembled and reassembled in the field. I understand a 12" tube assembly would be even more difficult to move in many instances but the weight and dimensions are known factors from their descriptions on the websites that you buy them from. In other words, a modicum of planning needs to take place before you buy. That said, I'd even prefer to transport my 12" ES truss structure assembled and throw that into the back of my SUV than I would a 10" f5 tube...    

 

I consider my GSO 10 inch F/5  an easy scope. It's not a handful, it's super easy and I am 73 years old.  I carry it in two pieces, the OTA and the base.. And it only takes a moment to assemble it. 

 

For numbers:  The OTA weighs 33 lbs, the base somewhat less. 

 

I normally take either my 12.5 inch or 16 inch when traveling in the motor home, the extra aperture is nice.  But the 10 inch is the easiest to deal with.

 

Anyone worried about transporting a tube Dob horizontally, they travel across the ocean in a container on their side.  Mine 10 inch F/5 is 19 years old and so far has no apparent effects of traveling on it's side.   

 

Jon


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#52 turtle86

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 09:13 AM

I consider my GSO 10 inch F/5  an easy scope. It's not a handful, it's super easy and I am 73 years old.  I carry it in two pieces, the OTA and the base.. And it only takes a moment to assemble it. 

 

For numbers:  The OTA weighs 33 lbs, the base somewhat less. 

 

I normally take either my 12.5 inch or 16 inch when traveling in the motor home, the extra aperture is nice.  But the 10 inch is the easiest to deal with.

 

Anyone worried about transporting a tube Dob horizontally, they travel across the ocean in a container on their side.  Mine 10 inch F/5 is 19 years old and so far has no apparent effects of traveling on it's side.   

 

Jon

 

My Orion 10" XTi is much the same.  I quickly carry the tube and base outside in two trips, and can have the scope set up and ready to go in five minutes.  Doesn't get much easier than that. It's actually easier to set up than most of my refractors.


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#53 junomike

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 05:38 PM

One thing to consider is a SW collapsible as IME the 12" isn't much more to move than a standard 10" (solid tube).


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#54 Keith Rivich

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 06:59 PM

Unfortunately, that's the way it's been for some time and it's only getting worse. frown.gif

 

I think for most people who want to do deep sky observing, the best scope is going to be the largest they can afford and transport to a dark site.  

 

Great advice too about going to a star party to check out other scopes.  Some of these larger scopes need to be seen in person to appreciate their size and heft.

First and foremost is to appreciate what they can show you. From a heart stopping view of M42 to a  faint smudge that you may be the only human to have ever laid eyes on. 

 

Heft and size are just a secondary logistics problem...



#55 MeridianStarGazer

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Posted 29 July 2021 - 07:13 PM

I agree that if you are going to travel all the way to a dark site, you might as well take 15 extra minutes if need be and load up a 12" truss. As long as the heaviest component is not much more than the 10", go for it. But if you only have time to view an hour or two once there and turn around, you might take the 10" so you can have more viewing time. Same thing for quick looks at home.

 

A 12" truss does cost more, and take longer to deploy. So picking a 10" is not a bad choice. But it is incorrect to say the 12" is not worth it. My main objection is to the 12" solid tube. Too much heft for me to want to deal with, except if it is on a dolly.


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#56 Pitu

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 07:56 PM

Hi guys. 

Just update on this question I have. 

For some time I compare 10" and12" side by side in my backyard in Tronto(very light polluted) and to be very honest I don't sow big difference. 

So I have to made some changes. 

I sold 12" and got 16" lighbridge.  

I don't have to ask difference between 12 and 16 because it is visible. 

Than  I got one more Meade LX200 8" GPS.  for every day us. Hope made good decision.  So 10" lighbridge son for sale. 

Thanks to everyone for opinion on 10 and 12

Cheers 


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#57 turtle86

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 08:29 PM

Hi guys. 

Just update on this question I have. 

For some time I compare 10" and12" side by side in my backyard in Tronto(very light polluted) and to be very honest I don't sow big difference. 

So I have to made some changes. 

I sold 12" and got 16" lighbridge.  

I don't have to ask difference between 12 and 16 because it is visible. 

Than  I got one more Meade LX200 8" GPS.  for every day us. Hope made good decision.  So 10" lighbridge son for sale. 

Thanks to everyone for opinion on 10 and 12

Cheers 

 

That'll work!  And when you're able to use the 16" at a dark site, be ready to have your socks knocked off.  smile.gif


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#58 Pitu

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Posted 03 September 2021 - 09:18 PM

That'll work!  And when you're able to use the 16" at a dark site, be ready to have your socks knocked off.  smile.gif

I lost my socks in Toronto. LOL so dark site maybe l will lose my ....  LOL


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#59 Mcloud

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Posted 05 September 2021 - 01:46 AM

I found my 10 inch Dob to be a one man operation. I could pick it up fully assembled one piece and carry it to the yard. Not so much with the 12. Don't know your circumstances but if you don't mind hauling it every time you use the 10 you'll wonder what the 12 may have shown.
On the other hand, outfit the 10 with flocking, get a LPR filter, in effect make it more. Myself I am mostly a solar system guy & was delighted with the affordable 8 inch Dob I got from Orion. The optic was just beautiful and the power it could handle proved it. I decided I liked it so much I would upgrade to the 10 and honestly it was a bust under these God awful Pittsburgh skies. So think before you act, just like you are doing collecting data here.
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