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U Cygni

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#1 gwd

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Posted 24 July 2021 - 10:52 PM

is well placed and near it's peak brightness now.   I was looking at it last night for the first time in a few years.   If I can see it well through the haze and light pollution here, many of you can too.   Cygnus is an aesthetically pleasing constellation and U Cygni is near some colorful stars.  I was using 25x100 tripod mounted but it looks good in my 20x60 too.   What I like about it is that with my modest equipment its variability makes it disappear.  I never know if I'll see it or what it will look like.   Last night it seemed just as bright as its neighbor HIP- 100230 it looks best to me when it becomes a bit brighter than its neighbor.  


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#2 Fiske

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Posted 24 July 2021 - 11:02 PM

Thanks for sharing, GW. Adding U Cygni to my observing list. smile.gif



#3 duck2k

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Posted 24 July 2021 - 11:41 PM

As soon as the stupid clouds part, I will put this on my list. I am hunting carbon stars. :)

#4 clastro8*

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Posted 26 July 2021 - 01:23 PM

I'll look for it too, according to the Pocket Sky Atlas, it is south of Tau and north of Zeta, assuming I understand correctly.

 

The Atlas says it is a double star, but I haven't found anything on that yet.

 

Just curious, why didn't you post this thread in the Observing forum?  I'm asking because I proposed there a sub-forum for binos-only doubles discussions but the idea did not win approval.

 

From my now 'seasoned beginner' viewpoint, I think the subject of U would be an ideal discussion for a binos-only doubles forum (especially from a 20x60 perspective), perhaps a sub-forum like that would work well here.  I certainly would like to see one.


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#5 sonny.barile

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Posted 26 July 2021 - 02:49 PM

This is from Sky Safari:

 

HD 193700 is a 7th magnitude Variable Double Star appearing in the constellation Cygnus. It is 1019 light years from our solar system. It is a yellow-orange giant of spectral type G2III. Its surface temperature is 5530 Kelvins - 4% cooler than the Sun's - and it is 9.1 times the Sun's diameter in size. This star's total energy output, or luminosity, is 70 times the Sun's, and it has a mass of 1.0 Solar masses.

This star is part of a double or multiple star system, but its orbit is not known. Its magitude +8.0 secondary component appears 65.5 arcseconds away, corresponding to a physical distance of at least 20469 AU from its primary.

HD 193700 is an eruptive variable star of type . At its faintest, it appears at magnitude +8.7, with an irregular or unknown period. <end>
 

The Omicron grouping (not truly related) that is nearby seem kind of interesting also....


Edited by sonny.barile, 26 July 2021 - 02:53 PM.

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#6 Fiske

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Posted 26 July 2021 - 03:03 PM

I'll look for it too, according to the Pocket Sky Atlas, it is south of Tau and north of Zeta, assuming I understand correctly.

 

The Atlas says it is a double star, but I haven't found anything on that yet.

 

Just curious, why didn't you post this thread in the Observing forum?  I'm asking because I proposed there a sub-forum for binos-only doubles discussions but the idea did not win approval.

 

From my now 'seasoned beginner' viewpoint, I think the subject of U would be an ideal discussion for a binos-only doubles forum (especially from a 20x60 perspective), perhaps a sub-forum like that would work well here.  I certainly would like to see one.

Even though the Binocular forum is technically an equipment forum, binocular observations are often published here because observing forums are generally dominated by telescopic observations. 

 

Fiske


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#7 Fiske

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 12:21 AM

I braved heat, humidity, and mosquitoes tonight for a view of U Cygni, and was not disappointed (despite hazy clouds that kept drifting through heedless of the forecast for a clear sky). BLL 49 (Robert Stawell Ball). StelleDoppie has it as 7.97/8.98 65.4" pa 231* and lists the class as R8, deep red. And indeed it is deep red, making a lovely contrast with its light blue companion. I observed it with the 100XL-SD and 10mm XW eyepieces (56x). Also enjoyed the Omicron 1 and 2 grouping with the 20mm XWs. Had a go at the nearby planetary nebula  NGC 6884, which eluded me in the hazy suburban skies but I'll try again on a better night. 

 

In addition, I observed OPI 9005 (9.10/10.00 29.4" pa 231*) and HJ 1510 (9.26/9.84 4.6" pa 149*). This pair of doubles could be seen in the same field with BLL 49 using Pentax 7mm XW eyepieces (80x - 0.875 degree FOV). HJ 1510 was challenging given the hazy sky and poor seeing, but could be resolved about 50% of the time, seen as two stars nearly in contact. I did not note particular colors in either of these doubles. HJ 1510 is a fine addition to my list of challenging doubles for the 100XL.

 

Thank you again George for starting this topic about U Cygni. I'm going to dig around in my observing logs to check whether I have observed it previously. I did have it listed along with SV and V Cygni as carbon stars in the margin of Uranometria 2000 chart 32. From years ago. smile.gif

 

Fiske


Edited by Fiske, 27 July 2021 - 04:44 PM.

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#8 gwd

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 12:22 PM

I'll look for it too, according to the Pocket Sky Atlas, it is south of Tau and north of Zeta, assuming I understand correctly.

 

The Atlas says it is a double star, but I haven't found anything on that yet.

 

Just curious, why didn't you post this thread in the Observing forum?  I'm asking because I proposed there a sub-forum for binos-only doubles discussions but the idea did not win approval.

 

From my now 'seasoned beginner' viewpoint, I think the subject of U would be an ideal discussion for a binos-only doubles forum (especially from a 20x60 perspective), perhaps a sub-forum like that would work well here.  I certainly would like to see one.

It just seems like a bino object to me because…..

 

With large telescopes it doesn’t disappear, with binoculars it is only visible at what 15 month intervals or so depending on your size.   Sometimes it’s maximum brightness occurs when the Sun is in the way so we have to wait two years.  When we can see it, it looks nice contrasted with its neighbor.  We have the challenge of finding out how long we can see it as it fades - like with Vesta this year.  Except with this reddish star we get to play around with the Purkinje effect.  


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#9 gwd

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 12:54 PM

For less experienced star gazers: 
If you’re trying to find a variable star like this one, the AAVSO has some nice tools.  They are considerate enough to put useful stuff right on their home page too!  The recent observations link let’s you see if you have a chance with your equipment.  The create a finder chart link lets you plan your star hop based on your equipment and local conditions.  They even give you a binocular option.    

 

Sometimes I make magnitude estimates to compare with the AAVSO contributors and realize I get excited about finding and observing the target.  My imagination adds photons to what the equipment presents.  If I get involved in sending data to AAVSO I’d best use a photoelectric photometer or something impartial.  


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#10 duck2k

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 01:05 PM

I have a PDF file from AAVSO regarding Carbon Star observing. :)
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#11 aznuge

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 12:54 AM

Cygnus -  what a star treasure!  I finally ventured out to find this double and was not disappointed  With the help of some 8x42s for spotting, and a green laser for painting the target area, I spotted U Cygni and its companion in my FOV at 85x with the 100mm BTs.  At this stage , U Cygni was bright, red/rorange, and actually seemed brighter in my view than its companion HD 193700, which has a colder gray/white/blue cast.  They make for a very nicely contrasted set of twins.  As I climbed the ladder north in my FOV I ran across two other doubles, tighter and dimmer than U Cygni. (I believe Fiske mentioned these in his post above).  This was as I moved my eyes north toward Omicron 2 Cygni on the opposite side of the field of view.  With the right positioning I could see all three doubles AND the much brighter Omicron 2 CYG in the same FOV at 85x.  Amazing view!

 

Thanks for the thread, George.

 

nuge


Edited by aznuge, 04 August 2021 - 01:00 AM.


#12 gwd

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 01:03 PM

Cygnus -  what a star treasure!  I finally ventured out to find this double and was not disappointed  With the help of some 8x42s for spotting, and a green laser for painting the target area, I spotted U Cygni and its companion in my FOV at 85x with the 100mm BTs.  At this stage , U Cygni was bright, red/rorange, and actually seemed brighter in my view than its companion HD 193700, which has a colder gray/white/blue cast.  They make for a very nicely contrasted set of twins.  As I climbed the ladder north in my FOV I ran across two other doubles, tighter and dimmer than U Cygni. (I believe Fiske mentioned these in his post above).  This was as I moved my eyes north toward Omicron 2 Cygni on the opposite side of the field of view.  With the right positioning I could see all three doubles AND the much brighter Omicron 2 CYG in the same FOV at 85x.  Amazing view!

 

Thanks for the thread, George.

 

nuge

We had clear NELM 3 skies for a couple hours between cloud fronts tonight.  U Cygni seemed brighter than its companion to me too. 

 

For handheld binocular users to find this under light polluted skies, U Cygni intersection of the two great circles defined by( Eltanin and Deneb) and (Vega and Fawaris).   If you sweep along either of those great circles toward their intersection you should easily pick up the Omicron group of colorful stars.   U Cygni is only about 4.5 degrees from Deneb so sweeping from Deneb toward Eltanin should get you there quickly.   

 

As long as you're in the neigborhood:

If you imagine sweeping from Fawaris toward Sadr, within the first three degrees, on your right as you face Sadr is AX Cyg.  Tonight in 25x100 and 20x60 binos it appeared in a pattern like the Christian cross with AX defining the short arm on the Sadr side of the cross.   AX Cyg didn't seem as red as U Cyg.  

 

Other things I was privileged to visit in Cygnus tonight:

Albireo - of course, the Omicron group- of course its right there by U, RS Cygni, P Cygni. M29, M39.  Thanks to Dave Mitsky and the other contributors to his recent 61 Cyg thread,  I'm now a member of the 61 Cygni fan club "It is more than just another pretty pair."  


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#13 GamesForOne

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 03:25 PM

That is one of my favorite fields in binoculars with the contrasting star colors and rich background of stars. Here is an image capture I took some years ago.

 

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Michael Mc

 

P.S. Also a good discussion from 10+ years ago archived at:

 

https://www.cloudyni...r-bino-targets/


Edited by GamesForOne, 04 August 2021 - 07:06 PM.

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#14 Fiske

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 05:28 PM

That is one of my favorite fields in binoculars with the contrasting star colors and rich background of stars. Here is an image capture I took some years ago.

 

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Michael Mc

Beautiful image, Michael. Thank you for sharing. smile.gif


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