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Interested in trying out a DayStar Quark H Alpha device

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16 replies to this topic

#1 Jethro7

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 01:15 PM

Hello Cners,

Solar viewing is a brand new Genre of Astronomy for me and would appreciate a bit of wisdom to get started. The DayStar Quark looks fun. I have the refractors, at least enough to get started with and the mounts along with Televue 2X and 4X Powermates and the power supplies already, so those are not in question.

 

My first question, in two parts. Equipping a DayStar Quark H Alpha device for service. First which model would be best to start out with. The Promenance or the Chromaspere? Is there a favorite?

 

What filters do I need in conjunction with the Quark? I do night Vision Astronomy and I use 6nm, 7nm and 12nm H Alpha narrowband filters and various IR Longpass filters from 610 to 685nm.

 

 What focal length eyepieces  would you recommend for the DayStar Quark?

 

Final questions. Should I forgo the Daystar Quark Device in favor of a Hershel wedge or should I have both? 

 

THANK YOU ALL AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro

 

 



#2 Aaron Small

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 01:39 PM

I got the Chromosphere model a few months ago and can't be happier.  I can still see prominences.  Biggest issue I have with it is I need to reduce my focal length (I am using it on my f/7 AT115) to get full disk views.  Only filter I use is a 2" Baader UV/IR cut filter as recommended to throw unwanted light/heat back out the front.  Think of the Quark as an ultra narrowband filter of only 0.5 nm with some slight adjustment for tuning.  Save your other filters for night.



#3 Jethro7

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 01:48 PM

I got the Chromosphere model a few months ago and can't be happier.  I can still see prominences.  Biggest issue I have with it is I need to reduce my focal length (I am using it on my f/7 AT115) to get full disk views.  Only filter I use is a 2" Baader UV/IR cut filter as recommended to throw unwanted light/heat back out the front.  Think of the Quark as an ultra narrowband filter of only 0.5 nm with some slight adjustment for tuning.  Save your other filters for night.

Hello Aaron,

 I have the 2"  Baader UV/IR cut filter.  The Quark operates like a 0.5nm Ultra narrowband filter, that makes things a bit clearer. 

 

THANK YOU AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro


Edited by Jethro7, 25 July 2021 - 01:48 PM.


#4 descott12

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 02:04 PM

 

 

Final questions. Should I forgo the Daystar Quark Device in favor of a Hershel wedge or should I have both? 

 

 

The quark is an H alpha device and the wedge is for white light. Quite different but also very complimentary. I really enjoy white light for spots but just a simple Baader solar film works very well for white light so you don't really need a wedge.


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#5 SgrB2

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 02:15 PM

Depending on the equipment you already have, you might want to

consider the Quark Combo.  See this post:

 

https://www.cloudyni...around-a-quark/

 

Cheers,

SgrB2



#6 Jethro7

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 02:30 PM

Depending on the equipment you already have, you might want to

consider the Quark Combo.  See this post:

 

https://www.cloudyni...around-a-quark/

 

Cheers,

SgrB2

Hello SgrB2,

That was helpful.

 

THANK YOU AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro



#7 cptbobrfh

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 03:52 PM

Hello Cners,

Solar viewing is a brand new Genre of Astronomy for me and would appreciate a bit of wisdom to get started. The DayStar Quark looks fun. I have the refractors, at least enough to get started with and the mounts along with Televue 2X and 4X Powermates and the power supplies already, so those are not in question.

 

My first question, in two parts. Equipping a DayStar Quark H Alpha device for service. First which model would be best to start out with. The Promenance or the Chromaspere? Is there a favorite?

 

What filters do I need in conjunction with the Quark? I do night Vision Astronomy and I use 6nm, 7nm and 12nm H Alpha narrowband filters and various IR Longpass filters from 610 to 685nm.

 

 What focal length eyepieces  would you recommend for the DayStar Quark?

 

Final questions. Should I forgo the Daystar Quark Device in favor of a Hershel wedge or should I have both? 

 

THANK YOU ALL AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro

Hi,Jethro7- 

 

Get the Chromosphere version. It not only gives you better surface detail, but the proiminces are still nice. No brainer here.My favorite. I've looked thru both devices.

 

If you have a 100-130mm refractor, for many reasons,use this aperture refractor. It gives you what I call the "sweet spot" aperture when using the Quark. 

 

If you have a 2" diagonal,use it. All you need is a 2" UV/IR cut filter you can get from any dealer. The filter would just thread onto the nosepiece(objective end) of the diagonal.

 

You would also need an inexpensive Solar Finder to point towards the Sun SAFELY, to locate the Sun looking thru the Quark. You would think why would anyone need a finder for the Sun? Trust me,you will need one,especially for the close up/hi-resolution views you get with the Quark.

 

Simple Plossl eyepieces work best with the Quark. Televue 32mm and Televue 40mm Plossls work great. If your seeing is good,you could go higher magnification to a 25mm Plossl, but going below 25mm mostly will not show crisp visual views with the Quark.

 

Hershell wedges are ok for white light views of sunspots, but believe me, nothing beats H-Alpha views for solar. Just my opinion from solar observing thru white light or H-Alpha, H-Alpha wins every time. The Chromosphere of the Sun in H-Alpha is truly amazing! White light is very limited in what it shows, but H-Alpha takes it to a different level.

 

Oh,I've been doing solar for ~18 years and looked thru just about everything and owned Coronado,Daystar,and Lunt telescopes/filters, so I do have experience with solar observing.

 

I am using the Chromosphere Quark 100% of the time,with William Optics binoviewers,with Lunt 102mm ED refractor,and Lunt 40mm solar telescope in tandem to get FULL DISC and zoomed in visual views. I love it. Here is a photo: 

 

Best wishes,

 

Bob

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Edited by cptbobrfh, 25 July 2021 - 03:54 PM.

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#8 Jethro7

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 04:51 PM

Hi,Jethro7- 

 

Get the Chromosphere version. It not only gives you better surface detail, but the proiminces are still nice. No brainer here.My favorite. I've looked thru both devices.

 

Hello Bob, 

That pretty much puts everything into a nut shell. The only thing I need is the DayStar Quark device Chromospere version.  Nice set up buy the way. 

 

A BIG THANK YOU

 

HAPPY SKIES TO YOU AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro



#9 cptbobrfh

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 05:15 PM

Hello Bob, 

That pretty much puts everything into a nut shell. The only thing I need is the DayStar Quark device Chromospere version.  Nice set up buy the way. 

 

A BIG THANK YOU

 

HAPPY SKIES TO YOU AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro

Thank you! Good luck in your adventure into the Sun! Any other questions,I would be very happy to help you.

 

Oh,by the way, the Quark works well with any refractor you have that is in the range of F/4-F/8, but works BETTER if it is between F/7-F/9.

 

 

Best,

 

Bob


Edited by cptbobrfh, 25 July 2021 - 05:22 PM.

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#10 Jethro7

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 05:21 PM

Thank you! Good luck in your adventure into the Sun! Any other questions,I would be very happy to help you.

 

Best,

 

Bob

Hello Bob,

If I am reading the information correctly the DaStar Quark model I need is the original Standard Chomophere  model DSZ4C.

 

HAPPYVSKIES AND GOOD STAR HUNTING, KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro



#11 cptbobrfh

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 05:27 PM

Hello Bob,

If I am reading the information correctly the DaStar Quark model I need is the original Standard Chomophere  model DSZ4C.

 

HAPPYVSKIES AND GOOD STAR HUNTING, KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro

Yes,that's the one. I think your Astrotech 102mm ED F/7 telescope is the SAME as my 102mm ED Lunt,just different name. Has same specs. as my Lunt OTA. I would use this scope FIRST with the Quark, THEN,if your daytime seeing is very good,try your C6 telescope.


Edited by cptbobrfh, 25 July 2021 - 07:35 PM.

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#12 betacygni

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 05:52 PM

cptbobrfh pretty much nailed it all above. Only things I’d add that in my experience a solar finder isn’t really needed if your using an alt/az mount. Using the shadow of the scope on the ground (making the shadow as small as possible) gets me close enough that I can just scan around that area and get the sun within 30 seconds. Certainly no harm in having a finder though, just not required.

Also popular wisdom on this forum would suggest longer focal ratio telescopes are better for the quark, but my experience has been showing the opposite (F5-F6 has been giving me best views). Will be posting more on this in a dedicated thread once I do a bit more experimenting, but I’m thinking the longer f ratio thing is coming more from people’s imaging results then visual, so don’t discount any of your refractors, give them all a go and see what works out best.

The other biggest thing to improve h-alpha visual is binoviewers. Unlike with night observing they seem to be pretty much universally agreed to greatly improve the solar views. The quark has an integrated Barlow, so regular binoviewers will reach focus easily without any special correctors or light path compensators.
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#13 Jethro7

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 10:12 PM

cptbobrfh pretty much nailed it all above. Only things I’d add that in my experience a solar finder isn’t really needed if your using an alt/az mount. Using the shadow of the scope on the ground (making the shadow as small as possible) gets me close enough that I can just scan around that area and get the sun within 30 seconds. Certainly no harm in having a finder though, just not required.

Also popular wisdom on this forum would suggest longer focal ratio telescopes are better for the quark, but my experience has been showing the opposite (F5-F6 has been giving me best views). Will be posting more on this in a dedicated thread once I do a bit more experimenting, but I’m thinking the longer f ratio thing is coming more from people’s imaging results then visual, so don’t discount any of your refractors, give them all a go and see what works out best.

The other biggest thing to improve h-alpha visual is binoviewers. Unlike with night observing they seem to be pretty much universally agreed to greatly improve the solar views. The quark has an integrated Barlow, so regular binoviewers will reach focus easily without any special correctors or light path compensators.

Hello betacygni,

Good to hear from you again. The success with Solar viewing with faster Achros going against convention is interesting and needs exploring. Believe me, I will try out my other refractors and the C6. I will put my bets on the AT102ED and the AT60 ED. But who knows For some reason I cant explain, maybe the Altair 102ED F/11 may just surprise me as it has done before, this scope is so amazing  it is weird. The acquisition of a binoviewer has been on my to do list. 

 

HAPPY SKIES TO YOU AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro

 

P.S. I set up the Altair 152 F/5.9 this evening to give it another try but when I looked up 45 min. after sunset I could see that the rising Moon was  colored red from the African Saharan dust. There is no point wasting time on skies with very poor transparency.


Edited by Jethro7, 26 July 2021 - 07:16 AM.


#14 betacygni

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Posted 25 July 2021 - 10:47 PM

Glad you made it over to the solar forum! Sneak preview of my findings so far, I also have an AT60ED and it has been the winner in 90% of my quark observing sessions, with a 120mm f5 winning when seeing was really good (both beating 60mm f/10, and 120mm f7.5). Will be very curious to hear how your Altair 102 f/11 and the 152 f/5.9 end up doing, both those scopes have been on my radar to possibly buy for both night observing and h-alpha.

Quick note on the c6, not sure SCTs are compatible with the quark (or maybe requires a costly full aperture energy rejection filter?), double check with daystar, but I think it would fry the secondary mirror. But again not 100% sure on this, never personally owned a SCT, or researched using one for h-alpha.

Edited by betacygni, 25 July 2021 - 10:53 PM.

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#15 cptbobrfh

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Posted 26 July 2021 - 05:31 AM

Jethro7- 

 

I thought you had the CR6,my bad. DO NOT USE THE C6 WITH THE ORIGINAL QUARK. The ORIGINAL Quark is for refractors!

 

Daystar sells the COMBO Quark for SCT's, but that is not the one you want to use for your refractors.

 

Bob


Edited by cptbobrfh, 26 July 2021 - 05:36 AM.


#16 Jethro7

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Posted 26 July 2021 - 07:34 AM

Glad you made it over to the solar forum! Sneak preview of my findings so far, I also have an AT60ED and it has been the winner in 90% of my quark observing sessions, with a 120mm f5 winning when seeing was really good (both beating 60mm f/10, and 120mm f7.5). Will be very curious to hear how your Altair 102 f/11 and the 152 f/5.9 end up doing, both those scopes have been on my radar to possibly buy for both night observing and h-alpha.

Quick note on the c6, not sure SCTs are compatible with the quark (or maybe requires a costly full aperture energy rejection filter?), double check with daystar, but I think it would fry the secondary mirror. But again not 100% sure on this, never personally owned a SCT, or researched using one for h-alpha.

Hello betacygni,

I was wondering if the 152 F/5.9 would need a ERF,  I personally only use my C8  Edge HD for Night vision Astronomy only, this is about all it excels at. Depending on what I am viewing using conventional eyepieces my refractors and the Dob perform much better for the task at hand.

 

HAPPY SKIES AND KEEP LOOKING UP Jethro



#17 Jethro7

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Posted 26 July 2021 - 07:36 AM

Jethro7- 

 

I thought you had the CR6,my bad. DO NOT USE THE C6 WITH THE ORIGINAL QUARK. The ORIGINAL Quark is for refractors!

 

Daystar sells the COMBO Quark for SCT's, but that is not the one you want to use for your refractors.

 

Bob

Hello Bob,

 

NOTED, THANKS Jethro




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