Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

7x fans?

  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Blue72

Blue72

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 405
  • Joined: 03 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Long Island, NY

Posted 25 July 2021 - 01:22 PM

I buy numerous binoculars over the years, but I keep going back to 7x. Because I like the freedom of handholding and it’s relaxed views after a long day at work. pic of my current inventory of 7x binoculars are below…..any other fans?

 

Nikon oceanpro 7x50

Nikon aculon 7x50

Maven 7x28

Opticron Discovery 7x42

Nikon  Aculon 7x35

I used to have a vintage pair of Nikon 7x20 I loved, but recently stolen 

 

9CDAD02A-E9C2-4FC1-9713-6B98F82CA5BF.jpeg


Edited by dd61999, 25 July 2021 - 01:23 PM.

  • ETXer, SMark, Foss and 8 others like this

#2 TOMDEY

TOMDEY

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10,202
  • Joined: 10 Feb 2014
  • Loc: Springwater, NY

Posted 25 July 2021 - 01:37 PM

Here's my favorite 7x bino; I used it for birding yesterday. It's by far the most comfortable and capable birding bino that I have. Zeiss Dialyt 7x42 B TP**    Tom

Attached Thumbnails

  • 42 Toms Zeiss 7x42 Binos Dont Fit Shirt Pocket.jpg

  • Grimnir, Paul Morow, SMark and 6 others like this

#3 warpsl

warpsl

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 144
  • Joined: 04 Jul 2012

Posted 25 July 2021 - 01:45 PM

I agree.i have a nippon kogaku 7x50.its the same as the tropical model.no need for a tripod.i am on the lookout for a jap made 7x35 with big prisms.


  • Blue72 likes this

#4 Blue72

Blue72

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 405
  • Joined: 03 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Long Island, NY

Posted 25 July 2021 - 01:52 PM

Here's my favorite 7x bino; I used it for birding yesterday. It's by far the most comfortable and capable birding bino that I have. Zeiss Dialyt 7x42 B TP**    Tom

 

always wanted to try those!



#5 Pinewood

Pinewood

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,595
  • Joined: 07 Dec 2004
  • Loc: 40.77638º N 73.982652 W

Posted 25 July 2021 - 02:07 PM

Hello Tom,

 

I certainly hold that binocular in high regard for bird watching, as it pushes all my buttons:  wide field of view, eyeglass friendly,  control of chromatic aberrations, and easy to hold.   

For finding planets in twilight, I could use the Dialyt or any 7x50, of which I own eight, but my IOR 7x40, a clone of the Zeiss Jena 7x40 NVA Porro seems to do just as well.

 

Stay safe,

Arthur


  • Corcaroli78 and MT4 like this

#6 PEterW

PEterW

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,672
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2006
  • Loc: SW London, UK

Posted 25 July 2021 - 02:20 PM

Still got me a couple, Rangemaster and Tasco 124.
Gifted a chinon to a local bird hide and another old Tasco to a young relative for bird/astro use (he lives in darker skies than I do).

Peter
  • Blue72 likes this

#7 ETXer

ETXer

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 713
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Rockville, MD USA

Posted 25 July 2021 - 08:31 PM

I also have a vintage (mid-fifties) 7x50 Nippon Kogaku Mikron bino I inherited from my Dad a few years ago, it’s still my favorite. I also have a Asahi Pentax 10x50 set, but I use my 7x50 a lot more.


Edited by ETXer, 25 July 2021 - 08:31 PM.

  • Blue72 likes this

#8 chris charen

chris charen

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,861
  • Joined: 10 Mar 2014
  • Loc: Auckland. New Zealand

Posted 25 July 2021 - 08:56 PM

Yes, 7x50s are easy to hand, they easy eye positioning and usually provide a bright, sharp to edge 3D image. Some struggle with the 'average' 50 degree Afov which is inherent in their design. I had the Nikon Ocean Pro 7x50 for several years and by far it was my favorite 'affordable' 7x50 bino. I like the ergonomics and it feel robustly built. The eye relief is a generous 22 mm. It has softish fold down rubber eyecups, the eye bridge is firm with no noticeable movement. It has a 7.1 mm exit pupil. The Tfov is 7.2 degrees - slightly more then the average 7.1 The image was bright and almost sharp to edge.The Nikon Ocean Pros are superior to the Tasco Off Shore's, the Barska Deep Sea's, the Steiner Commander and Observer's and the Bushnell H2O Marines. They are also clearly superior to the Fujinon Marine XL-WP - these surprisingly displayed excessive aberrations and distortions. I also prefer these Nikons to the Action AE W.P. 7x50's - they have a more restrictive 6.4 degrees Tfov. The higher end Fujinons are superior but again more expensive. I would recommend the Ocean Pro 7x50 if you are in the market for good 7x50 that is relatively affordable. [No not associated with Nikon in any way.]

 

Chris
.


Edited by chris charen, 25 July 2021 - 08:57 PM.

  • Blue72 likes this

#9 Blue72

Blue72

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 405
  • Joined: 03 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Long Island, NY

Posted 25 July 2021 - 09:28 PM

Yes, 7x50s are easy to hand, they easy eye positioning and usually provide a bright, sharp to edge 3D image. Some struggle with the 'average' 50 degree Afov which is inherent in their design. I had the Nikon Ocean Pro 7x50 for several years and by far it was my favorite 'affordable' 7x50 bino. I like the ergonomics and it feel robustly built. The eye relief is a generous 22 mm. It has softish fold down rubber eyecups, the eye bridge is firm with no noticeable movement. It has a 7.1 mm exit pupil. The Tfov is 7.2 degrees - slightly more then the average 7.1 The image was bright and almost sharp to edge.The Nikon Ocean Pros are superior to the Tasco Off Shore's, the Barska Deep Sea's, the Steiner Commander and Observer's and the Bushnell H2O Marines. They are also clearly superior to the Fujinon Marine XL-WP - these surprisingly displayed excessive aberrations and distortions. I also prefer these Nikons to the Action AE W.P. 7x50's - they have a more restrictive 6.4 degrees Tfov. The higher end Fujinons are superior but again more expensive. I would recommend the Ocean Pro 7x50 if you are in the market for good 7x50 that is relatively affordable. [No not associated with Nikon in any way.]

 

Chris
.

I am very impressed with the Oceanpro for astronomy as well. The stars have a sparkle to them which I don’t get in other 7x binoculars I have tried



#10 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 94,712
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 25 July 2021 - 10:20 PM

I have a few 7x35s and 7x50s as well as a pair of 7x42 Meade Montana roof prism binoculars.  

 

I am more of a 10x type but there's a place for 7x binos too.  One nice thing about older binoculars is that they almost always have a story behind them..  In my case, a number of them have the same story.. I see an ad on CN or Craigslist for some binoculars.. The seller is forum member Foss.. He lives about 10 minutes away so it's temptation at it's worst.. 

 

- Nikon Nippon Kogaku 7x 35 7.3 Degrees  (Foss)

 

-Tasco 116, 7x35, 10.5 degree TFoV..  I was going to the little store near our place in the high desert and saw some tables setup under a tree with stuff for sale.  I saw these binos, looked through them, they looked clear and collimated.  I asked how much?  $4..  My gasp was so loud they all thought I was whining about the price.. 

 

- Bushnell Instafocus 7x35s..  Probably a thrift store, under $10.  

 

- Nikon 7x35 AEs.  Craigslist.  $40.. Near new but missing one lens cover.

 

- Meade 7x42 Montana's 8 degree FOV.  I bought these off Astromart from John Cota who was a member of this forum 15 years ago., some of you might remember John.   Nice roof prism binos, plenty of eye relief and a nice close focus.

 

-  7x50 Tower binos.  These were my fathers, the family binoculars, someone here dated them to 1964.. I was 16 at the time. (I am older than that now) These have magnesium frames, BK4 prisms, nice little twist up eye cups..

 

Tower binoculars Laddy 1.jpg

 

The numbers and Mark's comments:

 

"No wonder you like it. The Futaba/Tamron combination is well known among vintage Swift collectors. One of my favorite wide angle 7x35's has the same J-B26 / J-E45 designation...

 

J-B26 is Futaba Kogaku Kogyo who was responsible for the optics.

J-E45 is Tamron Co. who was responsible for the metalwork."

 

- 7x50 WWII binos.  Another pair I purchased from Foss.  Some coating damage, IF, the price was right ($20) and they are very workable under dark skies.

 

Jon


  • SMark and Blue72 like this

#11 Grimnir

Grimnir

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,367
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2010
  • Loc: London, England.

Posted 26 July 2021 - 02:39 AM

Here's my favorite 7x bino; I used it for birding yesterday. It's by far the most comfortable and capable birding bino that I have. Zeiss Dialyt 7x42 B TP**    Tom

Mine too.

 

Graham


  • SMark and MT4 like this

#12 MT4

MT4

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 794
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2021
  • Loc: Tokyo, JP

Posted 26 July 2021 - 06:06 AM

I buy numerous binoculars over the years, but I keep going back to 7x. Because I like the freedom of handholding and it’s relaxed views after a long day at work. pic of my current inventory of 7x binoculars are below…..

 

I love 7x binoculars for the same reasons that you articulated.

 

I once read on CN:  "Everybody needs a good 7x."   I didn't get it at first, especially considering the off-the-charts level of light pollution where I am.  After getting my first 7x, a Nikon EDG 7x42, I totally got the message.   I had thought the Nikon Ell 8x30 was really easy to handhold, but the Nikon EDG at 7x was even easier to handhold for steady views.  And the 6mm exit pupil helps too in giving relaxed views.

 

My recent find, a vintage 10-deg Kowa 7x35, is also a very nice 7x.  I have some other super-wide vintage 7x35's but unfortunately I cannot see their full FOVs with my glasses on and so they belong to the "fun" super-wide 7x35 category instead of getting used regularly.


  • Blue72 likes this

#13 MT4

MT4

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 794
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2021
  • Loc: Tokyo, JP

Posted 26 July 2021 - 06:15 AM

 

I certainly hold that binocular in high regard for bird watching, as it pushes all my buttons:  wide field of view, eyeglass friendly,  control of chromatic aberrations, and easy to hold.   

For finding planets in twilight, I could use the Dialyt or any 7x50, of which I own eight, but my IOR 7x40, a clone of the Zeiss Jena 7x40 NVA Porro seems to do just as well.

 

Stay safe,

Arthur

 

I just read "wide field of view, eyeglass friendly" and it already sounded like music to my ears smile.gif

 

Guess I'll need to keep an eye out for a good deal on a Zeiss Dialyt 7x42 B TP*.   My binocular collection is currently 100% made up of Made-in-Japan binoculars.   I guess I could use a bit of diversity and inclusion in my lineup smile.gif



#14 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 949
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 26 July 2021 - 07:17 AM

Not precisely astro-binoculars and not light to carry around, but both my Zeiss provide enjoyable and relaxed daytime views. The 7x40 GA is really sharp on axis and in sunny days, the green tint is a relief smile.gif . The DF 7x40 has wide views and a good conversation topic due to the added functionalities. 

 

7x40BGA  6
7x40NVA_29.jpg
 
Clear skies!
Carlos

 


  • nowhere, Blue72 and j.gardavsky like this

#15 Cestus

Cestus

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 526
  • Joined: 30 Jul 2019

Posted 26 July 2021 - 03:49 PM

The clouds are holding on, of course, after I got my Maven 7x45. I did get some views of the moon and it is great. I do find it easier to hold and the views are bright and sharp. I wish that I could finally get a good view of the Milky Way with these.

 

I've seen good reviews of the Maven 7x28 as well.



#16 ECP M42

ECP M42

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,077
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2021
  • Loc: central Europe 45°N

Posted 26 July 2021 - 04:14 PM

I've had several 7xs and kept a few, because there's something I really like about 7x. I can't say exactly, but I prefer them to 8x and they seem to be more complementary whit the 10x, which I often use.
I would actually prefer the 6xs, but very few are as wide as the 7xs, so they are a shelter.
I have a 7x32 with 14 ° of field and it is impressive, but the geometric rendering does not fully satisfy me. In some ways I prefer other more coherent binoculars, such as the Leitz Binux 8x30 with 7.1 °, but if there was a 6x30 with 12-13 ° of the same quality, I'd take it right away! 



#17 treadmarks

treadmarks

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,260
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2016
  • Loc: Boston MA

Posted 26 July 2021 - 06:01 PM

I'd say I'm firmly in the 7x gang. 7x is the traditional magnification because it is right at the limit at which you can hold a binocular with any degree of steadiness. Even at 7x, I can notice a little shaking. At higher mags, I'm sorry but it's just not possible to hold them steady unless you are able to brace it somehow.

 

Certainly, 10x's and 15x's give a nicer view for some objects and in a lot of cases, it's worth the shaking and the tired arms. But 7x gives a good view without any annoying shaking.


  • Blue72 likes this

#18 hallelujah

hallelujah

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8,127
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2006
  • Loc: North Star over Colorado

Posted 26 July 2021 - 06:20 PM

My Fujinon FMTR-SX 7x50 is a monster, but, it has always been very

comfortable for viewing and never fails to satisfy my tired aging eyeballs. gramps.gif

 

http://company7.com/...0750fmtrsx.html

 

Stan


Edited by hallelujah, 26 July 2021 - 06:27 PM.

  • SMark, WALL.E, nowhere and 2 others like this

#19 nowhere

nowhere

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 205
  • Joined: 18 Mar 2018
  • Loc: Vancouver

Posted 26 July 2021 - 08:06 PM

I've found I prefer 7X50s to 10X50s too.

 

Funny thing is I'm old enough to have bought my first binoculars back when 7X50 was still the default recommendation for astronomy - but the binoculars I found that I could afford were Bushnell 10X50s (early 80s if I remember correctly, with the "InstaFocus" rocker) and I always felt like I was somehow doing something wrong by using them on the night sky. Nowadays it's 10X50 that everyone seems to recommend and I'm using 7X50 Nikon Prostars! I still have the Orion Ultraview 10X50s I bought with filters for our eclipse trip to Oregon a few years back but since the Nikons showed up Sun viewing is just about all I use them for.


  • Crusty99 and Blue72 like this

#20 Pinewood

Pinewood

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,595
  • Joined: 07 Dec 2004
  • Loc: 40.77638º N 73.982652 W

Posted 27 July 2021 - 05:23 AM

I just read "wide field of view, eyeglass friendly" and it already sounded like music to my ears smile.gif

 

Guess I'll need to keep an eye out for a good deal on a Zeiss Dialyt 7x42 B TP*.   My binocular collection is currently 100% made up of Made-in-Japan binoculars.   I guess I could use a bit of diversity and inclusion in my lineup smile.gif

Hello MT4,

 

I should specify the the true field of view is 8.5º.

 

Stay safe,

Arthur


  • MT4 likes this

#21 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 94,712
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 27 July 2021 - 05:45 AM

I'd say I'm firmly in the 7x gang. 7x is the traditional magnification because it is right at the limit at which you can hold a binocular with any degree of steadiness. Even at 7x, I can notice a little shaking. At higher mags, I'm sorry but it's just not possible to hold them steady unless you are able to brace it somehow.

 

Certainly, 10x's and 15x's give a nicer view for some objects and in a lot of cases, it's worth the shaking and the tired arms. But 7x gives a good view without any annoying shaking.

 

I have to think the amount of shaking depends on the individual as well as the binoculars.  For me, longer, heavier binoculars mean steadier but more frequent stops to rest.

 

10x is a good balance, I can do 15x..

 

Jon


  • SMark, treadmarks, nowhere and 1 other like this

#22 Tony Flanders

Tony Flanders

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 19,969
  • Joined: 18 May 2006
  • Loc: Cambridge, MA, USA

Posted 27 July 2021 - 06:50 AM

I'd say I'm firmly in the 7x gang. 7x is the traditional magnification because it is right at the limit at which you can hold a binocular with any degree of steadiness. Even at 7x, I can notice a little shaking. At higher mags, I'm sorry but it's just not possible to hold them steady unless you are able to brace it somehow.


As Jon says, all occurrences of "you" in that paragraph should be changed to "I." Hand-holdability varies wildly among users due to at least three factors. Probably the least important is physical aptitude -- though some people do have muscle tremors, and there's not a whole lot anybody can do about that. Somewhat more important in most cases is technique. And likely most important of all is tolerance for shakiness.

If I look for it carefully, I can see shakiness even in my 2X binoculars, and easily in my 6X binoculars. And as owner of a pair of image-stabilized 10x binoculars, I know for a fact that the shakiness at 10X degrades the views substantially in certain ways. (Nothing like being able to eliminate the shakes at the press of a button.) Most importantly, it makes open clusters quite a bit harder to resolve.

 

Even so, I prefer hand-held (and unstabilized) 10x binoculars to 7x binoculars for most though not all deep-sky observing. But I still have a soft spot for 7x binoculars due at least partly to the fact that that's what I first used for astronomy many decades ago.


  • Jon Isaacs, treadmarks and ECP M42 like this

#23 Blue72

Blue72

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 405
  • Joined: 03 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Long Island, NY

Posted 27 July 2021 - 07:28 AM

Shooters use natural point of aim to eliminate shakes in optics.

 

I apply the same techniques  when glassing or observing the heavens. I can even hold 20x reasonably well for short periods.

 

But even then, when learning natural point of aim, they still teach you to use the minimum amount of magnification to see the target. Matter of fact at many Appleseed events, people’s scores go up when dialing their high powered scope down to 3-4x magnification. 

 

its a skill worth having. 



#24 treadmarks

treadmarks

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,260
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2016
  • Loc: Boston MA

Posted 27 July 2021 - 10:21 AM

As Jon says, all occurrences of "you" in that paragraph should be changed to "I." Hand-holdability varies wildly among users due to at least three factors. Probably the least important is physical aptitude -- though some people do have muscle tremors, and there's not a whole lot anybody can do about that. Somewhat more important in most cases is technique. And likely most important of all is tolerance for shakiness.

If I look for it carefully, I can see shakiness even in my 2X binoculars, and easily in my 6X binoculars. And as owner of a pair of image-stabilized 10x binoculars, I know for a fact that the shakiness at 10X degrades the views substantially in certain ways. (Nothing like being able to eliminate the shakes at the press of a button.) Most importantly, it makes open clusters quite a bit harder to resolve.

 

Even so, I prefer hand-held (and unstabilized) 10x binoculars to 7x binoculars for most though not all deep-sky observing. But I still have a soft spot for 7x binoculars due at least partly to the fact that that's what I first used for astronomy many decades ago.

I have noticed that, with my 15x binoculars, there is still some instability even when I am resting my elbows on a firm surface. Nowadays I keep the mounting bracket permanently attached to those binoculars, it's that important.

 

Yes, the unsteadiness can make things harder to see, especially faint stars and fine details. But I've found that, the majority of the time, higher magnification will allow you to see more. So that's not the issue. The problem is the tired arms and the objects bouncing all around the FOV. 7x's just feel comfortable and natural and effortless to use, which is why I reach for them first unless I know I need extra firepower.



#25 ECP M42

ECP M42

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,077
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2021
  • Loc: central Europe 45°N

Posted 27 July 2021 - 11:01 AM

Shooters use natural point of aim to eliminate shakes in optics.

What is that? 

 

 

EDIT: I saw it!

https://en.wikipedia...al_point_of_aim


Edited by ECP M42, 27 July 2021 - 11:10 AM.

  • Blue72 likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics