Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Confirmation of a Jupiter feature please (Hotspots ?)

  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 patrickt

patrickt

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 156
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2017
  • Loc: Manila, Philippines

Posted 27 July 2021 - 09:20 AM

Hello Everyone !

                            I`m still learning to identify basic features on Jupiter using my oldschool Vixen 80mm / f.l.= 1200mm refractor. I have managed to identify the basic bands and zones, as well as seen the GRS a few times during decent seeing, and a moon transit just a couple of times. I am still unable to identify other vaguely visible features e.g. swirls and such.

 

                             I then saw this image of Jupiter, taken by someone on our Astronomy forum back home, using an 8 inch reflector. I then asked if anyone knew what the two or three spots were that were just touching the upper portion of the North Equatorial Band. Someone says they might be hotspots ???  Anyway, nobody seemed to know.... I then asked permission from the imager to post his pic on Cloudy Nights, and he gladly agreed.

       

                            So may i ask the experienced ones to confirm if they are Hotspots ? If not, what are they ? Assuming they are Hotspots, would they be visible through my 80mm ?                      Thanks !    Patrick        p.s. first time i posted a pic, i thought it would be difficult

Jupiter.jpg


Edited by patrickt, 27 July 2021 - 09:25 AM.

  • Maciek_Cz and TheUser like this

#2 duck

duck

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 326
  • Joined: 11 Jun 2020
  • Loc: madera ca

Posted 27 July 2021 - 09:55 AM

they are called barges.  Loops, knots, whirlpools, ovals, festoons, blue eruptions.  Got to love Jupiter.

 

(Not sure if barges is correct, but fun anyhow.)


  • rkelley8493 likes this

#3 patrickt

patrickt

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 156
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2017
  • Loc: Manila, Philippines

Posted 27 July 2021 - 10:11 AM

DUCK -  

               Thanks for replying, Yes i have heard some of those terms. So your 100 percent sure they arent Hotspots ? I just needed to be sure.



#4 duck

duck

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 326
  • Joined: 11 Jun 2020
  • Loc: madera ca

Posted 27 July 2021 - 10:21 AM

Don't know about the temperature.  However, they are a relatively common feature.  Suiter in Star Testing added "whorls and crenelations" to the family of Jupiter's atmospheric descriptors.



#5 barbarosa

barbarosa

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,178
  • Joined: 11 Apr 2010
  • Loc: 139 miles W of the Awahnee Hotel

Posted 27 July 2021 - 10:38 AM

Check the wiki article, look for barges, hot spots and festoons. Festoons (which is the term I learned) are hot spots. Barges are cyclonic ovals. I still prefer barges.



#6 patrickt

patrickt

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 156
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2017
  • Loc: Manila, Philippines

Posted 27 July 2021 - 01:43 PM

They do seem to look more like barges.  So anyway, thank you both for your responses. I will just check the wiki article then. Be safe.



#7 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 98,918
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 27 July 2021 - 03:16 PM

https://www.cnet.com...he-brown-barge/

 

https://www.nasa.gov...and-brown-barge



#8 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 98,918
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 27 July 2021 - 03:21 PM

There's a more recent article posted at https://www.cnn.com/...-scn/index.html



#9 patrickt

patrickt

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 156
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2017
  • Loc: Manila, Philippines

Posted 27 July 2021 - 07:00 PM

DAVE MITSKY - Thanks for the links !



#10 Ihtegla Sar

Ihtegla Sar

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,000
  • Joined: 02 Apr 2019
  • Loc: Pacific Northwest

Posted 30 July 2021 - 11:02 PM

Hello Everyone !
I`m still learning to identify basic features on Jupiter using my oldschool Vixen 80mm / f.l.= 1200mm refractor. I have managed to identify the basic bands and zones, as well as seen the GRS a few times during decent seeing, and a moon transit just a couple of times. I am still unable to identify other vaguely visible features e.g. swirls and such.

I then saw this image of Jupiter, taken by someone on our Astronomy forum back home, using an 8 inch reflector. I then asked if anyone knew what the two or three spots were that were just touching the upper portion of the North Equatorial Band. Someone says they might be hotspots ??? Anyway, nobody seemed to know.... I then asked permission from the imager to post his pic on Cloudy Nights, and he gladly agreed.

So may i ask the experienced ones to confirm if they are Hotspots ? If not, what are they ? Assuming they are Hotspots, would they be visible through my 80mm ? Thanks ! Patrick p.s. first time i posted a pic, i thought it would be difficult
Jupiter.jpg


I've been seeing those two long dark spots near the center of the photo just touching the NEB a few times in the past month in my 100mm Tak doublet. After seeing them, I looked them up online and have heard them referred to as "barges" but I am no expert in the Jupiterian nomenclature.

They are big enough and dark enough that you should be able to see them in your 80mm Vixen if the seeing is good.

#11 patrickt

patrickt

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 156
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2017
  • Loc: Manila, Philippines

Posted 31 July 2021 - 02:48 AM

LHTEGLA SAR - 

                               I would have checked them out myself, but we are unfortunately in what we call the Rainy Season, where recent monsoons and correspondingly cloudy skies have prevented my doing that. Thanks for your reply.


Edited by patrickt, 31 July 2021 - 02:48 AM.



CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics