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Baader Neodymium and UHC filters.

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#1 Iones

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 12:30 PM

I have a Baader Neodymium (moon and skyglow) filter, but I read online that UHC filters are better when it comes to removing light pollution and increasing contrast.

 

My question is, if I end up buying a UHC filter (Or even something like an L-enhance filter), will there still be situations where the Baader Neodymium filter will be better? or will I always use the UHC filter?

 

If I do end up only using the UHC filter, do you have any recommendation for a website to sell my Baader Neodymium? 

 

I will use this filter mainly for visual purpose, but I also sometimes do astrophography of small and bright objects like planetary nebula and globular clusters.

 

 


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#2 MLM

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 12:40 PM

Nico Carver posted a great YouTube video comparing filters, including the Baader Neodymium, for visual and astrophotography, in light polluted sites and in dark sites.

 

Here's the link

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=Xorp4f05dhU


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#3 Mike G.

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 02:53 PM

My Baader M&S filter is my go-to filter for Jupiter and Saturn.  it does a really good job of enhancing the colors.  never even tried it in a UHC function, just use it for planets.


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#4 Iones

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 03:51 PM

My Baader M&S filter is my go-to filter for Jupiter and Saturn.  it does a really good job of enhancing the colors.  never even tried it in a UHC function, just use it for planets.

Never thought of using it for planets, it is a really good idea. Thanks!

Edit: I went and looked on the box and it is literally written "greatly increase contrast on the moon and planets", so I guess thats on me lol. I always thought of the filter as a purely LPR/UHC filter.


Edited by Iones, 27 July 2021 - 04:04 PM.


#5 Iones

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 03:51 PM

Nico Carver posted a great YouTube video comparing filters, including the Baader Neodymium, for visual and astrophotography, in light polluted sites and in dark sites.

 

Here's the link

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=Xorp4f05dhU

Thanks, I will check it out



#6 sanbai

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Posted 27 July 2021 - 05:14 PM

Here a visual observer.

I just got one, but no time to test it. However, I have been using for a couple of years a closely related Baader Semi-Apo. It's the same but with the extreme blue removed from the transmission.

As a deep sky filter, I haven't seen the benefit. It's marginal, and not really useful in the heavily light polluted skies I have at home. I haven't noticed either any improvement in darker skies, but that may be me (read: if any, the effect is subtle). Not dinner views either. I'm still wondering if the part of the spectrum that is chopped in the Semi-APO negates the benefits of the basic M&SG filter. That could be the case for galaxies, for example.

I don't expect better DSO performance with the M&SG, but we will see. I've bought mainly for planetary work, and for curiosity.

Take into account that the neodymium glass absorbs around sodium emission line. Unfortunately, this type of lights isn't that prevalent (if at all) in my area. Incandescent or LED lights won't be significantly affected.

For emission nebulae, a "real" UHC that filters H-beta and O-III is the way to go. For other stuff, magnification is (sometimes) your friend, if it works at all for the object in question.
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