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View of the Earth

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#1 REC

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 12:22 PM

I'm not sure where to post this, so I'll just start here. Last night I was watching part of the movie, Apollo 13 and they showed the part where the craft broke away from gravity and they where high enough to get a grand view of the planet and the sky above it was filled with stars. It was a great view and I was wondering if the Astronauts can really see a sea of stars surrounding the planet like that? If so, it must be a fantastic view and I wonder where I could see an actual photo or video of that scene?

 

Thanks, Bob



#2 OldManSky

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 12:29 PM

Neither astronauts nor cameras will see a "sea of stars" around a daylight-lit Earth.  Neither our eyes nor any cameras have the kind of dynamic range it would take to properly expose both a bright daylight Earth and all those very faint stars.  

When they're on the night-side of Earth...possibly.  But not when they're on the daylight side of Earth.

 

FYI, this is one of the very silly items "we didn't land on the moon" conspiracy theorists jump on as "proof" -- that photos of the moon surface exposed for the sun-lit lunar surface don't show stars in the sky.  Same reason -- exposing for the bright surface means not a long enough exposure to show any stars.  :)



#3 MisterDan

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 12:58 PM

Neither astronauts nor cameras will see a "sea of stars" around a daylight-lit Earth.  Neither our eyes nor any cameras have the kind of dynamic range it would take to properly expose both a bright daylight Earth and all those very faint stars.  

When they're on the night-side of Earth...possibly.  But not when they're on the daylight side of Earth.

 

FYI, this is one of the very silly items "we didn't land on the moon" conspiracy theorists jump on as "proof" -- that photos of the moon surface exposed for the sun-lit lunar surface don't show stars in the sky.  Same reason -- exposing for the bright surface means not a long enough exposure to show any stars.  smile.gif

Au contraire!

 

https://web.archive....on-landing.html

 

I recall seeing this classic chronicle back around 2003.  I loved it then and love it still.

grin.gif


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#4 mrflibbles

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Posted 28 July 2021 - 03:45 PM

Yeah, unfortunately there are people in this world that: no matter how much evidence is presented, they won't believe you.

 

I'm of the belief that: if you took a flat earther up on Jeff Bezos's rocket and showed them the earth with their own eyes, they would have some convoluted excuse for that too.


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