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Looking to purchase a good telescope

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#101 teashea

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Posted 06 August 2021 - 09:07 PM

I am planning to buy another good telescope for my further studies in the Astrology field. I have already a sleek one but I am not satisfied with it. Anybody can further advise me in this regard. I am looking good options and also I have no budget issue.

That would be astronomy.  Tell us more about what you want and how much you want to spend.



#102 ThusSpokeZarathustra

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Posted 06 August 2021 - 09:22 PM

The user's name is manohoroscope, think the individual implies astrology. I profess my ignorance of anything astrology related, I didn't even think one would have a use for telescope in astrology! As such, I think the individual in question should start a new thread either in the beginners or equipment form for answers. I kind of want to see manohoroscope's sleek one telescope. What would an astrologers telescope even look like? confused1.gif  Like asking what lab equipment an alchemist would fancy.



#103 erickench

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Posted 06 August 2021 - 09:51 PM

That is very unfortunately.  Vixen no longer has a US distributor and until they get one it stocks up, we will need to buy our Vixens from other countries.

I just ordered the 70MM Vixen with a Porta II mount from a US Distributor called Adorama. It's on the way.



#104 teashea

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Posted 07 August 2021 - 07:17 PM

I just ordered the 70MM Vixen with a Porta II mount from a US Distributor called Adorama. It's on the way.

Adorama is a vendor, not a distributor.  It is actually unlikely that they have the telescope.  I hope for your sake they have it in stock, but the odds are against it.  They will probably be notifying you that they do not really have one.  



#105 erickench

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 08:08 AM

Adorama is a vendor, not a distributor.  It is actually unlikely that they have the telescope.  I hope for your sake they have it in stock, but the odds are against it.  They will probably be notifying you that they do not really have one.  

No. I checked the UPS website. It's already been shipped.


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#106 ThusSpokeZarathustra

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 08:40 AM

take a picture of it for the refractor forms, it'll be a nice compilation to all the nice refractors.



#107 teashea

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 07:18 PM

No. I checked the UPS website. It's already been shipped.

Congratulations ---- that is wonderful.  We want photos and a review please.



#108 teashea

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 07:32 PM

Honestly as a fellow beginner I would up your budget.  Something like a 6 inch Dobsonian would work for you much better.  It has its own mount, will be a lot more stable and will actually let you see things.  Shopping for telescopes on price alone will buy you a lot of disappointment.  There are some great inexpensive scopes but they have to be paired with good mounts and have decent optics to be used and useful.  

 

Do not buy a telescope from Amazon!  It is like the department store toy scopes and you won't save much compared to buying a scope from an astronomy shop.  Please go watch Ed Ting's video on common beginner mistakes and what not to do.  

 

Orion, while some people dislike them, makes decent budget equipment.  They have a 6 inch Dobsonian in stock right now at $379 shipped.  

 

https://www.telescop...yCategoryId=398

 

That scope, while smaller than the recommended 8 inch, will do and see more than a small inexpensive refractor on a shaky mount.  Whatever mount that comes with a beginner, cheap scope needs to be upped to two sizes bigger for proper stability.  My first scope came with such a mount and the shakes annoyed me enough that I bought a heavier mount that cost as much as the scope and mount together ($289).  Much better.  $85 more would have gotten the 6 inch Dobsonian with everything ready to go.  

 

$319 gets you the 4.5 inch version from Orion, likewise in stock, but it is a much smaller scope intended for kid heights whereas the 6 inch is more tolerable for an adult.

 

You can push around a 6 inch Dob easily and see the Moon, planets and deep sky objects.  I have a 5 inch reflector that does ok at this.  While an 8 inch scope is almost a perfect starter scope, the 6 inch will be light, manageable and easy to sell if you find it isn't for you.   You wouldn't be able to give away the Powerseeker 127EQ.  I have a Meade Polaris 130EQ, while ok, is in the same boat.  The tube, at least, is optically ok and I plan on giving it to my nephew this Fall.

 

You get what you pay for in amateur astronomy and there is a floor to a decent starter experience.  $300 is really the floor whether a small Dobsonian or small refractor like a Short Tube 80.  They cost about the same and will be better mounted.  

 

Buy once and be happy.  I had to jump through a couple scopes to find what worked well and I would have skipped a couple side roads and saved a bit of money but spending a bit more upfront.

 

Matt

Actually, Amazon has some good telescopes.  You have to have the knowledge of which ones are and which are not.



#109 teashea

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 07:36 PM

Online merchandisers ie like eBay,Amazon,alliepress, i would personally try to avoid like the plague!.not so much for the product itself more so for the care and attention to detail you will not receive that you would with a more specialised vendor who sells scopes from entry level to advanced on a daily basis.these guys are mainly amateur astronomers themselves and on most part quite educated and knowledgeable and will definitely give you a better after sales service any day of the week that an online merchandiser! Will.

 

the slight draw back is your relatively low budget and you will be very limited for choice and actual overall performance at that price level.so as an alternative the preowned market might be a better option for you in offering a bigger bang for your buck.however being truthful with s budget of under $150 this kind of leaves you in the same predicament again in choice.

we are guiders! On CN unfortunately not miracle workers.(in the nicest possible way of course)so my best advice would be if you cannot afford anything over $150 dollars at the moment,I would wait personally untill you can afford something which will serve your purposes and exspections well.

I agree completely.  You cannot purchase a decent telescope and mount for that price.  Better to save up for a while and not be frustrated with a piece of junk.



#110 teashea

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 07:38 PM

Meade is out of business and the telescope is junk?

Yes.  Meade went into bankruptcy.  Their assets were obtained by Orion.  There are many comments here on CN about it.



#111 erickench

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 10:25 PM

Check out this gadget. It's a digital eyepiece camera that will work on my Mac Book Air Laptop.

https://www.amazon.c...DKIKX0DER&psc=1


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#112 ThusSpokeZarathustra

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 10:47 PM

I'd avoid amazon for buying astronomy stuff at all cost. Too expensive and very little quality. ZWO makes a camera just like that on but at the same price and of higher quality. For astronomy, go to High Point Scientific. Also, I'd focus on eyepieces first rather than cameras.


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#113 xvariablestarx

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 10:51 PM

I'd avoid amazon for buying astronomy stuff at all cost. Too expensive and very little quality. ZWO makes a camera just like that on but at the same price and of higher quality. For astronomy, go to High Point Scientific. Also, I'd focus on eyepieces first rather than cameras.

I think a lower cost camera would work, but erickench is concerned about it working on a Mac. My ZWO camera works on Linux, so I am pretty sure it would work on Mac, of course not having a Mac, I can't test that opinion.

 

I read elsewhere on the site, that their USB 3.0 cameras are Mac compatible, but the opening poster should research it themselves : https://astronomy-im...duct/asi120mc-s


Edited by xvariablestarx, 08 August 2021 - 11:10 PM.


#114 erickench

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 04:52 PM

Well my telescope came through United Parcels today. I put it together in my living room.



#115 erickench

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 05:33 PM

Here is my brand new telescope fully assembled.

Telescope1.jpg Telescope2.jpg


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#116 ThusSpokeZarathustra

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 06:11 PM

Nice! Wish I started with that scope. You should post that picture on the refractor pictures thread! Although, it looks like you mounted the finderscope bracket backwards.



#117 erickench

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 07:12 PM

Nice! Wish I started with that scope. You should post that picture on the refractor pictures thread! Although, it looks like you mounted the finderscope bracket backwards.

Really? It's funny that you should mention that. The instructions say I'm supposed to slide an O-ring into the grooves on the finderscope. I looked and there was no O-ring in the box and no grooves anywhere to be seen.



#118 Sky Muse

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 11:26 PM

Hmm, my latest acquisition looks rather similar to your own kit...

 

kit.jpg

 

However, that alt-azimuth can't hold a candle to your new Vixen Porta II.  Thank goodness you got that one, rather than the "Mobile Porta", as that would've been an easy mistake to make.

 

Dude, you got a 70mm f/12.9 achromat; rather than a Dell, and exactly as my own Meade.  I say "exactly", for most likely both were produced in the same factory overseas.  Congratulations.  The other Meade, of which I had linked to previously, is a 70mm f/10, and not quite as capable.  In hindsight, it's most fortunate that the Vixen 80mm f/11.4 kit was sold out; yes, indeed.

 

These 70mm achromats, at f/12.9, will exhibit only little to slight false-colour when viewing brighter objects.

 

 

The telescope has a focal-length of 900mm, which may be used to calculate and choose eyepieces.  For example, a 32mm Plossl will provide the lowest power and the widest view of the sky.  Combined with the 6x24 finder-scope, the two will assist in hunting for objects to observe...

 

900mm ÷ 32mm = 28x, and almost binocular-like.

 

Your kit should have come with 20mm(45x) and 6.3mm(143x) eyepieces.  Then...

 

900mm ÷ 4mm = 225x

 

You might want a 2x-barlow, and for experimenting with your eyepieces.

 

Just the other night, I was scanning the sky with my 70mm f/12.9, and I ran across a brighter star, purely at random.  In went the Astro-Tech "Titan" 10mm 70°, and at 90x.  I could see the almost razor-sharp diffraction-rings, and the tight, circular Airy-disk, of the star.  I also conducted an impromptu star-test whilst I was at it, and on the fly.

 

After that, I popped in one of my 4mm eyepieces, at 225x, whilst aimed at Polaris, the North Star.  Polaris doesn't move, there in the sky, not that you can tell.  At that highest of powers, I could detect a diffraction-ring, and an as equally well-defined and circular Airy-disk.

 

 

Your telescope came with an Amici/erect-image diagonal, according to the kit's specs.  In addition, your diagonal appears nigh identical to my GSO 90° erect-image...

 

GSO 90° Amici.jpg

 

These are oft included with smaller refractor kits by the manufacturers, and for double-duty: for birds in trees, ships at sea, those sorts of things, during the day; also, for the Moon, planets and stars at night.  Isn't that clever?  Actually, it isn't.  This is an inexpensive Amici-diagonal that was included with one of my entry-level refractor kits...

 

Celestron Amici2.jpg

 

Note its small aperture, and for light from an object to pass through to an eyepiece and the eye.

 

This is my GSO Amici-diagonal again, and compared to my Celestron star-prism diagonal...

 

diagonal types7.jpg

 

They appear quite similar to one another, and for those unknowing they would have a very difficult time in discerning the important differences between the two.  This is one difference, and between the same two diagonals...

 

diagonal types7b.jpg

 

Note how much larger the aperture is with the star-prism.  Which one do you think would allow for the widest image through, say, a 32mm Plossl, or a 20mm wide-angle eyepiece?

 

Another difference is the detriment associated with Amici-diagonals, and known as the "Amici line".  Here are the Amici-lines of my Celestron and GSO Amici-diagonals...

 

Amici lines2.jpg

 

They appear as fine strands of spider-silk, and are almost impossible to see with the eye, but the camera is able to capture them, as you can see.  The detriment is seen only on small, bright objects, like the brighter planets, and the brighter and brightest of stars.  Here's Jupiter, through a star-diagonal, and an Amici-diagonal...

 

https://i.imgur.com/18Z6qU1.jpg

 

You'll be able to note that when you use your kit-diagonal whilst viewing Jupiter.  At present, Jupiter is putting up a fine show there in the sky.

 

There's no rule against using an Amici-diagonal at night.  Some actually prefer them, and in matching the orientation of their star charts and maps.  However, I, personally, don't consider that to be an advantage, so much.

 

There are two types of star-diagonals: a star-prism, and a star-mirror.  At f/12.9, you can most definitely use a star-prism.  Prisms are more durable than mirrors.  There is also less light-scattering with a prism when viewing brighter objects.

 

There is the Celestron star-prism, and economical, like my own, and the Baader star-prisms at considerably greater cost.  I have one of those, too.

 

The 70mm f/12.9 refractor has a rather long focal-length, so open it up with a star-diagonal.  The word "star" says it all, and for use at night.

 

 

In so far as your optical finder and mounting-bracket, this is how it should be mounted...

 

finderscope3b.jpg

 

Now, that's on a reflector, and the finder is facing forward.

 

A rubber o-ring is used to center the front of the finder-scope within its holder.  At the back of the finder, three screws are used to adjust the alignment.  In the case of the one I illustrated, a 5x24, I lined the front of the holder with self-adhesive felt; rather, flocking material which is thinner...

 

accessories2b.jpg

 

The o-ring, or felt, stabilises the front of the finder-scope.  Either centers the scope within its holder, and snugly.  You don't want the front of the finder-scope moving round, only the rear and where its motions are controlled by the three screws during alignment.

 

Aligning the finder-scope to your telescope is best done during the day, so it has been opined.  You aim the telescope at an object up high, like a utility pole or tower, the farther away the better, and focus on a specific part of the structure.  You then keep the telescope trained on the feature, and adjust the finder-scope until it points to the same object, the same feature, that you see in the telescope.  The higher the power of the eyepiece in the telescope, the more accurate the alignment will be.

 

I align my own using the Moon, on the fly, at night.  Polaris may be used as well, as, again, it doesn't move.


Edited by Sky Muse, 11 August 2021 - 12:18 AM.

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#119 erickench

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Posted 11 August 2021 - 08:21 AM

I was looking at the moons of Jupiter last night. I counted about 8-9 of them. I was a little disappointed that I didn't see much color. Jupiter is a colorful planet with it's bands and big red spot.



#120 ThusSpokeZarathustra

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Posted 11 August 2021 - 08:37 AM

Probably upgrade the diagonal if you want to increase performance.



#121 xvariablestarx

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Posted 11 August 2021 - 08:48 AM

I was looking at the moons of Jupiter last night. I counted about 8-9 of them. I was a little disappointed that I didn't see much color. Jupiter is a colorful planet with it's bands and big red spot.

The brightness of Jupiter tends to wash out the color in small telescopes, the colors are subtle tans and yellows, with a slightly darker color for the Great Red Spot. You will see four of the moons for sure. If you do a movie and stack the frames you will see more color, but I am not an expert on that process.



#122 erickench

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Posted 11 August 2021 - 06:47 PM

Check out these filters. They're selling them for a good price.

https://www.amazon.c...8N0HEITXK&psc=1



#123 xvariablestarx

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Posted 11 August 2021 - 06:52 PM

Check out these filters. They're selling them for a good price.

https://www.amazon.c...8N0HEITXK&psc=1

Get a polarized Moon filter, forget all the colored filters.



#124 erickench

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Posted 11 August 2021 - 08:35 PM

Get a polarized Moon filter, forget all the colored filters.

What does a moon filter do for viewing the planets?



#125 xvariablestarx

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Posted 11 August 2021 - 08:39 PM

What does a moon filter do for viewing the planets?

Well it works on the Moon by cutting down glare, so its more comfortable to see, Jupiter also is quite bright so it MAY help.

The colored filters don't do much on the Moon or planets in my experience, but maybe somebody else has a different set of experiences.




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