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#1 starcruzer

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Posted 01 August 2021 - 11:57 AM

It was huge(based on the micro world). The medium collected was soaked moss on side of stream with tap(well water) added. Sample was infested with Rotifers among other microbes. I have a cell phone video of it but not able to load. Photo  was extracted from video. Movement seemed to be coming from 2 legs just right behind the head, looked like it was doing the dog paddle but legs was in sync(both moving same direction at same time) and quite fast. I am new to the micro world only had microscope like 3 months.  I know it is not a single or multi cell microorganism, many times bigger than a nematoid, just amazing what ya find. 

1_Moment.jpg

6.jpg

7.jpg

 

 

 


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#2 MisterDan

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Posted 01 August 2021 - 12:17 PM

My guess is a midge larva of some sort.  (There are countless different species.)

 

Here's another image of a similar larva:

http://dept.harperco...idge_Larvae.JPG

 

Your image appears to correspond more with the "tail" (rear) end of the larva.  Insect larva heads are fairly distinctive and almost always as large or larger than adjacent segments, so your image likely shows the rear of the larva.

 

Very cool images.

Thanks for sharing

Dan



#3 Stevegeo

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Posted 01 August 2021 - 12:19 PM

Dont eat it..  best advice. And if it's in the water. Drink it... .



#4 MisterDan

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Posted 01 August 2021 - 12:38 PM

Your NC location and the mention of "moss" reminded me of another tiny critter that few folks know:  the Spruce-Fir Moss Spider, which is the smallest known/classified tarantula.  First discovered on Mount Mitchell almost 100 years ago, these tiny tarantulas are becoming more and more rare.

 

Here's an interesting article:

https://www.nwf.org/...Fir-Moss-Spider.

 

Midge larva?  Common and countless.  -But the world's smallest tarantula?...  Now, that's an interesting critter from the Smokies!

 

Best wishes.

Dan


Edited by MisterDan, 01 August 2021 - 12:38 PM.


#5 petert913

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Posted 01 August 2021 - 12:49 PM

YUK !!  :)



#6 starcruzer

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Posted 01 August 2021 - 01:07 PM

My guess is a midge larva of some sort.  (There are countless different species.)

 

Here's another image of a similar larva:

http://dept.harperco...idge_Larvae.JPG

 

Your image appears to correspond more with the "tail" (rear) end of the larva.  Insect larva heads are fairly distinctive and almost always as large or larger than adjacent segments, so your image likely shows the rear of the larva.

 

Very cool images.

Thanks for sharing

Dan

I believe you are correct. The photo are VERY similar. But still have to think that is the head as it was always leading the direction of movement.



#7 starcruzer

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Posted 01 August 2021 - 01:13 PM

Your NC location and the mention of "moss" reminded me of another tiny critter that few folks know:  the Spruce-Fir Moss Spider, which is the smallest known/classified tarantula.  First discovered on Mount Mitchell almost 100 years ago, these tiny tarantulas are becoming more and more rare.

 

Here's an interesting article:

https://www.nwf.org/...Fir-Moss-Spider.

 

Midge larva?  Common and countless.  -But the world's smallest tarantula?...  Now, that's an interesting critter from the Smokies!

 

Best wishes.

Dan

Wow....I live just under an hour east of Asheville. I take day trips several times a year to the mountains, BRP(Blue Ridge Parkway) plus back roads to enjoy hidden gems. Thanks for the link a fascinating read Again thanks



#8 MisterDan

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Posted 01 August 2021 - 02:57 PM

I believe you are correct. The photo are VERY similar. But still have to think that is the head as it was always leading the direction of movement.

After looking again, I believe you are correct.  I've run across other images of midge larvae, and some of their heads do not have that classic "flattened sphere" appearance.  -And, typically, their rear ends are home to more appendages and tubules than are indicated in your images.  Their head and thorax areas are less "busy."

 

I may have to break out my stepson's microscope and check out the "world" that turns up after a good rain in our chicken run (if we get one, today).

 

Cheers and fun 'scoping (be it tele or micro).

Dan




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