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Stars and deep skies of Scutum

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#1 brida1709a

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 05:46 AM

It's a new month, and with that comes another constellation of the month. What can anyone tell me about the skies within Scutum?

#2 KidOrion

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 09:00 AM

It's one of the only constellations that doesn't contain any galaxies within range of a 12" scope.



#3 brida1709a

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 09:04 AM

It's one of the only constellations that doesn't contain any galaxies within range of a 12" scope.


Good point πŸ™‚

#4 LIVE LONG

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 09:10 AM

   Scutum contains M11, The Wild duck Cluster. Hands down my all time favorite open cluster. My 10 inch dob does a great job of resolving it.


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#5 brida1709a

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 09:20 AM

[quote name="LIVE LONG" post="11266540" timestamp="1627913434"]

Scutum contains M11, The Wild duck Cluster. Hands down my all time favorite open cluster. My 10 inch dob does a great job of resolving it.[/quote

Isn't there one other Messier object within Scutum?

#6 LIVE LONG

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 09:27 AM

[quote name="LIVE LONG" post="11266540" timestamp="1627913434"]

Scutum contains M11, The Wild duck Cluster. Hands down my all time favorite open cluster. My 10 inch dob does a great job of resolving it.[/quote

Isn't there one other Messier object within Scutum?

Yes, M26. It's ok, but by no means can it be compared to M11.

 

There is also a carbon star, about 2 degrees south of M11. It's worth searching for, if you are interested!


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#7 brida1709a

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 09:29 AM

Yes, M26. It's ok, but by no means can it be compared to M11.

There is also a carbon star, about 2 degrees south of M11. It's worth searching for, if you are interested!


Great deal of info there. I'll need to keep an eye out for the C type star. Do you know it's designation?

#8 LIVE LONG

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 09:36 AM

Great deal of info there. I'll need to keep an eye out for the C type star. Do you know it's designation?

No. It's the only carbon star in Scutum, that I know of.



#9 PEterW

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 12:54 PM

Scutum star cloud with some dark nebulae around it….

Peter
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#10 j.gardavsky

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 01:41 PM

Yes, M26. It's ok, but by no means can it be compared to M11.

 

There is also a carbon star, about 2 degrees south of M11. It's worth searching for, if you are interested!

 

S Scuti, spectral type C64

 

There is a bunch of faint Sharpless nebulae in Scutum, but faint and not large, and the reflection nebula IC 1287.

 

Clear skies,

JG
 


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#11 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 02:27 PM

Scutum contains the odd globular cluster NGC 6712.  Nearby NGC 6712 lies the planetary nebula IC 1295.

https://spider.seds....MWGC/n6712.html

 

https://observing.sk...l/NGC_6712.html

 

https://observing.sk...ul/IC_1295.html

 

https://www.universe...nebula-ic-1295/

 

http://cosmicneighbo...6712-ic1295.htm


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#12 brida1709a

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Posted 02 August 2021 - 02:42 PM

What about the Scutum Cloud?
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#13 j.gardavsky

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Posted 03 August 2021 - 08:28 AM

What about the Scutum Cloud?

The Scutum Cloud,

is a sort of brightening of a portion of the Milky Way, surrounded by the obscuring Barnard's and Lynds dark nebulae.

 

A very nice brightening visible with the unaided stars, or for the low magnification binoculars,

JG



#14 brida1709a

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Posted 03 August 2021 - 11:21 AM

The Scutum Cloud,
is a sort of brightening of a portion of the Milky Way, surrounded by the obscuring Barnard's and Lynds dark nebulae.

A very nice brightening visible with the unaided stars, or for the low magnification binoculars,
JG


I think i have seen it before. I might dive deep into it and find what's inside it.
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#15 j.gardavsky

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Posted 03 August 2021 - 12:13 PM

I think i have seen it before. I might dive deep into it and find what's inside it.

Inside the Scutum Cloud?

Just more dark nebulae, some of them filamentary,

 

JG



#16 brida1709a

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Posted 03 August 2021 - 12:27 PM

Are there any srars in Scutum that belong to a particular moving group or association?

#17 Keith Rivich

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Posted 04 August 2021 - 01:24 PM

6712 and IC1295 can be seen in the same FOV. Very nice pair in my 18 and 25" scopes! There is another planetary really close, same FOV, can't remember the name, tiny little thing with a nice green color. It sits in a curved row of 4 similar magnitude stars. I'll look it up when I get off work. 

 

Found it! Kohoutek 4-8   https://www.utopia-p...e/f/01/p60.html

Scroll down to the second annotated image. 


Edited by Keith Rivich, 04 August 2021 - 02:02 PM.

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#18 Tony Flanders

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Posted 05 August 2021 - 06:45 AM

Scutum is utterly awesome. In addition to the obvious showpiece M11, it contains of one of the most interesting sections of the Milky Way, overwhelmingly bright and beautiful to the unaided eye, through binoculars, and through telescopes of every size. The constellation is in fact named after the Milky Way patch, which is far more prominent under dark skies than any of Scutum's stars.

 

There are enough dark nebulae in Scutum to keep you busy for a lifetime.



#19 brida1709a

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Posted 05 August 2021 - 06:49 AM

Scutum is utterly awesome. In addition to the obvious showpiece M11, it contains of one of the most interesting sections of the Milky Way, overwhelmingly bright and beautiful to the unaided eye, through binoculars, and through telescopes of every size. The constellation is in fact named after the Milky Way patch, which is far more prominent under dark skies than any of Scutum's stars.

There are enough dark nebulae in Scutum to keep you busy for a lifetime.


That's an awesome description of detail. From what you just mentioned, the sky within Scutum is a treasure trove of delights that excites the inner of imagination. This makes want to sell out more within it. Thanks 😊

#20 Nightfly

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Posted 08 August 2021 - 11:33 AM

Fully agree with Tony.

 

The Scutum Star Cloud is the elephant in the room! 

 

Under dark skies it is a treasure to behold in binoculars, which is the best way to see it in my opinion.  Surrounding the cloud are numerous dark nebulae and a flotilla of small "star patches".  Telescopes generally see much to narrowly to fully appreciate what this area has to offer.  There's something for every instrument of course,  but don't miss out on the wider view.



#21 Starman1

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Posted 09 August 2021 - 05:34 PM

Scutum is utterly awesome. In addition to the obvious showpiece M11, it contains of one of the most interesting sections of the Milky Way, overwhelmingly bright and beautiful to the unaided eye, through binoculars, and through telescopes of every size. The constellation is in fact named after the Milky Way patch, which is far more prominent under dark skies than any of Scutum's stars.

 

There are enough dark nebulae in Scutum to keep you busy for a lifetime.

Uh, not exactly.

The puff of Milky Way is known as the Scutum Star Cloud because it is in Scutum, not the other way around.

The constellation is named for a Polish war hero Sobieski and was referred to as Scutum Sobieski for many years, named Scutum Sobiescianum by Johannes Hevelius in 1684 to commemorate the victory of the Christian forces led by Polish King John III Sobieski (Jan III Sobieski) in the Battle of Vienna in 1683. Later, the name was shortened to Scutum.

 

If the stars of approximately equal brightness are connected, the shield resembles the long shields used during the crusades:

http://goldenarmor.c...iana-jones.html

Connect the dots between alpha--beta--eta--delta--gamma, and back to alpha to see the shield shape.

I have an earlier post on the subject, with a drawing:

https://www.cloudyni...sion/?p=9934336


Edited by Starman1, 09 August 2021 - 05:36 PM.

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#22 j.gardavsky

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Posted 10 August 2021 - 04:01 AM

As Don has written above,

 

for the small to medium apertures, the Scutum Cloud is just a puff of the Milky Way,

as standing out thanks to the surrounding dark nebulae and molecular clouds.

 

On its western rim,

there is a North-South band of molecular clouds, with the small Sharpless HII nebulae Sh2-69, Sh2-66, Sh2-67, Sh2-65. These belong to the objects seen along the Galactic equator.

The band itself can be observed through the binoculars, the small Sharpless nebulae are much better seen through the telescopes with the nebular filters.

 

The Scutum Cloud is spectacular when viewed with unaided eyes on very clear nigths,

JG

 

Best,

JG


Edited by j.gardavsky, 10 August 2021 - 04:02 AM.

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#23 Voyager 3

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Posted 14 August 2021 - 12:37 AM

Interested in Scutum's dark Nebulae ? Don't forget to read this gem .

https://skyandtelesc...ae071520151507/


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#24 j.gardavsky

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Posted 14 August 2021 - 06:39 AM

Interested in Scutum's dark Nebulae ? Don't forget to read this gem .

https://skyandtelesc...ae071520151507/

The very large B111 dark nebulae complex is easy through my 8x56 binoculars.

 

Some other dark nebulae in the Scutum Cloud, not shown in the S&T article are:

B109, B105, B108, B117a, B120, B121,  B122, B123, B124, B128-131, requiring excellent skies.

 

Thanks for reminding the dark nebulae,

JG


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#25 C.Hay

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Posted 15 August 2021 - 09:56 AM

Uh, not exactly.

The puff of Milky Way is known as the Scutum Star Cloud because it is in Scutum, not the other way around.

The constellation is named for a Polish war hero Sobieski and was referred to as Scutum Sobieski for many years, named Scutum Sobiescianum by Johannes Hevelius in 1684 to commemorate the victory of the Christian forces led by Polish King John III Sobieski (Jan III Sobieski) in the Battle of Vienna in 1683. Later, the name was shortened to Scutum.

 

If the stars of approximately equal brightness are connected, the shield resembles the long shields used during the crusades:

http://goldenarmor.c...iana-jones.html

Connect the dots between alpha--beta--eta--delta--gamma, and back to alpha to see the shield shape.

I have an earlier post on the subject, with a drawing:

https://www.cloudyni...sion/?p=9934336

Now that's an interesting re-interpretation. To my eyes, the Scutum Star Cloud is just like the stylised heraldic shields seen in European coats or arms and all over 17th- and 18th-century Catholic churches in Germany and Poland. It seems fairly clear this is what was meant by the constellation's inventor - not 12th-century British longshields that Hevelius would presumably have found thoroughly antiquated.

 

But let's not shed crusading blood over the issue ...

 

CS, Christopher


Edited by C.Hay, 15 August 2021 - 09:58 AM.

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